Modern Languages and Literature

Chairperson: Christina Isabelli
Professors: G. Brooke (Emerita), L. García-TorviscoC. Isabelli, B. Semple
Associate Professors: 
B. BoyerT. Haaland, F. Kuester (Emerita), R. Marquis, S. Nedderman, R. Stephanis
Assistant Professors:
A. Schumacher
Senior Lecturers: D. Birginal, S. Katsushima, U. Perz
Lecturers:
 K. Bishop, A. García Osorio

The department offers two majors and four minors:

Bachelor of Arts, French major
Bachelor of Arts, Spanish major
Minor in French
Minor in German
Minor in Spanish
Minor in Italian

The Department of Modern Languages and Literature offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in French and Spanish, and cooperates in offering majors and minors in Italian studies, Latin American studies, European studies and Asian studies. All language majors are encouraged to become proficient in a foreign language through study abroad. All language majors take a comprehensive exam, write a thesis, or engage in a capstone experience; content varies by language. Majors need a minimum of 19 credits (French) or 25 credits (Spanish) at the 300 level or above.

Minors are available in French, German, Italian, and Spanish. The Asian Studies, Latin American Studies, and European Studies programs, which are part of the International Studies major, are fully described under International Studies. The Italian Studies major and minor are described under Italian Studies. Since the effective availability of upper level courses offered on the main Spokane campus will at times be contingent on enrollment, completion of the Italian minor may require participation in study abroad programs and/or enrolling in summer courses.

Gonzaga also offers programs of study (year or semester) in Paris, France or in Aix-en-Provence and courses may be transferred to Gonzaga and applied to the major requirement. Gonzaga-in-Florence, Italy, admits students for a summer, year or a semester of study. The department has a fall and spring semester program in Granada, Spain, a summer intensive program (up to six credits) in Cuernavaca, Mexico, and also accepts courses from sponsored programs in Argentina or Chile. Gonzaga students can study abroad in Tokyo and Akita, Japan through the Japanese Program for one semester, one academic year, or for a 6-week summer session. Occasionally, students in the German program can spend a semester or a whole academic year at the University in Graz, Austria, or participate in a language program during the summer.

B.A. Major in French: 35 Credits

or 19 credits at the 300 level and above
Lower Division
FREN 101 Elementary French I 4 credits
FREN 102 Elementary French II 4 credits
FREN 201 Intermediate French I 4 credits
FREN 202 Intermediate French II 4 credits
Upper Division
One course in literature: 3 credits
FREN 323 Le Paris des contrastes

FREN 327 Introduction to Existentialism

One course in cinema: 3 credits
FREN 331 Contemporary French Cinema

One course in culture/civilization: 3 credits
FREN 340 La France d'aujourd'hui

FREN 350 French Civilization and Culture

French 300/400 level Electives 6 credits
FREN 499 French Comprehensive 1 credit
FREN 495 Senior Seminar 3 credits
 open to French minors only with permission of the professor. 
In order to reach the level of linguistic and cultural proficiency required for the French major, most students should expect to study abroad. They may do so through participation either in the programs in Paris or Aix-en-Provence or in another approved study abroad program. French minors are strongly encouraged to study abroad for a year, or a semester, or in an approved summer program.   

B.A. Major in Spanish: 37 Credits

or 25 credits at the 300 level and above
Lower Division
SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II 4 credits
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 4 credits
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 4 credits
Upper Division
SPAN 301 Advanced Spanish I  3 credits
SPAN 320 Advanced Spanish II 3 credits
SPAN 302-399*
   must have one course from SPAN 321-399
6 credits
SPAN 400 - 489 
3 credits
SPAN 302-489               9 credits
SPAN 499 Senior Capstone 1 credit
* While student may elect to make courses between SPAN 302-319, only three credits can count towards the major.  

Minor in French and German: 28 Credits
Minor in Italian: 26 Credits

(or 12 credits at the 300 level and above)

Lower Division
Elementary Level (6 credits for Italian minors) 6-8 credits
Intermediate Level 8 credits
Upper Division
Electives in Same Language 12 credits

All Italian minor credits must be from courses taught in Italian.

 

 

Minor in Spanish: 27 Credits

(or 15 credits at the 301 and above)

Lower Division
SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II  4 credits
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 4 credits
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II  4 credits
Upper Division
SPAN 301 Advanced Spanish 1 3 credits 
SPAN 320 Advanced Spanish II 3 credits
SPAN 300 - 498 Electives *
* While student may elect to take courses between SPAN 302-319, only three credits can count towards the minor.
9 credits

 


Special Topics in Language Courses
With prior approval of the Departmental Chair, students may study a language abroad (in a university approved program) not offered at Gonzaga and transfer these credits to Gonzaga.
Lower Division
ARAB 101 Elementary Arabic I
4.00 credits
Grammar, composition, verbal practice and oral comprehension form the basis of this course. Designed to provide the student with the fundamentals of Arabic.
ARAB 102 Elementary Arabic II
4.00 credits
A continuation of ARAB 101 through verbal practice, oral comprehension, reading composition and grammar.
Prerequisite:
ARAB 101 Minimum Grade: D
ARAB 201 Intermediate Arabic I
4.00 credits
Intermediate reading, grammar, vocabulary and translation. Explores the root and pattern system of Arabic grammar and complex sentence structure.
Prerequisite:
ARAB 102 Minimum Grade: D
ARAB 202 Intermediate Arabic II
4.00 credits
Intensive written and oral work to develop written and oral comprehension. Composition, advanced vocabulary work and grammar.
Prerequisite:
ARAB 201 Minimum Grade: D
ARAB 290 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor and approved by the Department Chair.
Upper Division
ARAB 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional experience in a setting related to the Arabic-speaking community in which Arabic is used. Student is responsible to find an appropriate internship and to present a plan (description, objectives, proposed assessment) to the Department Chair for approval.
Prerequisite:
ARAB 202 Minimum Grade: D
 
Lower Division
CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I
4.00 credits
Credit for Chinese language is given to students through the Consortium Agreement (Department Chair approval required) or Study Abroad programs only.
CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese II
4.00 credits
Credit for Chinese language is given to students through the Consortium Agreement (Department Chair approval required) or Study Abroad programs only.
CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese I
4.00 credits
Credit for Chinese language is given to students through the consortium agreement (Department Chair approval) or study abroad programs only.
CHIN 202 Intermediate Chinese II
4.00 credits
Credit for Chinese language is given to students through the Consortium Agreement (Department Chair approval required) or Study Abroad programs only.
CHIN 290 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
Upper Division
CHIN 301 Advanced Chinese I
3.00- 4.00 credits
Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
CHIN 303 Conversation and Composition
3.00 credits
Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
Prerequisite:
CHIN 302 Minimum Grade: D
CHIN 390 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
 
Lower Division
FREN 101 Elementary French I
4.00 credits
Grammar and pronunciation, extensive oral practice, short compositions, and reading of simple texts. Fall.
FREN 102 Elementary French II
4.00 credits
A continuation of FREN 101. Spring.
FREN 190 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
FREN 200 French Conversation
3.00 credits
Review of grammar and syntax with emphasis on spoken French. Progressive exercises in conversation. Upon sufficient demand.
Prerequisite:
FREN 102 Minimum Grade: D
FREN 201 Intermediate French I
4.00 credits
Review of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax. In addition to work in oral French, there are progressive exercises in reading and composition. Fall.
FREN 202 Intermediate French II
4.00 credits
A continuation of FREN 201. Spring.
FREN 280 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
By arrangement.
FREN 290 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
Upper Division
FREN 300 Advanced Grammar Review
3.00 credits
An intensive one-semester grammar course with extensive oral practice. Fall.
Prerequisite:
FREN 202 Minimum Grade: D
FREN 301 Advanced French I
3.00 credits
Short stories, plays, novels, or essays by modern authors, with grammar and conversation based on the texts studied. Practice in phonetics where needed. Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
FREN 302 Advanced French II
3.00 credits
Continuation of FREN 301. A greater emphasis on composition and advanced style. Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
Prerequisite:
FREN 301 Minimum Grade: D
FREN 303 Advanced Language Practice I
3.00 credits
Oral and written comprehension, oral and written expression, grammar, vocabulary. Basic of phonetics. Culture and civilization. Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
FREN 304 Advanced Language Practice II
3.00 credits
A continuation of FREN 303. Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
FREN 315 Advanced French Conversation
3.00 credits
Intensive practice in oral French. Study of vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation through discussion of cultural topics.
FREN 323 Le Paris des contrastes
3.00 credits
Paris, ville d'amour et d'exclusion sociale. Students will analyze manifestations of social integration and exclusion, through representations of the city of Paris in French literary texts (short stories, novel and poetry), films, songs, photographs, and architecture.
FREN 327 Intro to Existentialism
3.00 credits
Students will analyze existentialist thought and become more acquainted with famous names associated with the area of Saint-Germain-des-Pres, such as Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Juliette Greco, etc. Existentialism will be approached as a cultural and humanistic movement, a way of life and rebirth in post-war Paris. Recommended for INST: European Studies major or minor. Taught in French.
Prerequisite:
FREN 300 Minimum Grade: D
FREN 331 Contemporary French Cinema
3.00 credits
A study of French cinema as it has evolved in the last two decades. The films viewed will be used as a means to encourage reflection on the history, ideas and values that have gone into the making of modern France. The course is offered in English and French in separate sections. For students who take the English section of the course through the INST cross-listing, there is no French prerequisite. Spring.
Equivalent:
INST 339 - Successful completion
FREN 340 La France d'aujourd'hui
3.00 credits
A culture course that explores the political, social, economic, administrative, and cultural reality of contemporary France. Recommended for INST: European Studies major or minor. Taught in French.
FREN 350 French Civilization & Culture
3.00 credits
The political, social, intellectual, and artistic development of French culture from the beginning to the present. Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
FREN 365 French Politics
3.00 credits
A study of the French political system, its parties, elections, and how the system works in the new European order. Available only through sponsored Study Abroad programs.
FREN 380 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Selected topics in French language, literature or civilization.
FREN 390 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
FREN 415 Business French
3.00 credits
Offered Abroad.
FREN 491 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Selected readings by arrangement.
FREN 495 Senior Seminar
3.00 credits
The major French writers by genre. Fall.
Prerequisite:
FREN 323 Minimum Grade: D or FREN 327 Minimum Grade: D
FREN 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional experience in a supervised organizational setting allowing for the applied use of skills in French language and/or knowledge of Francophone cultures. An internship plan (description, objectives, learning outcomes) is devised with a French program faculty member before the internship begins.
FREN 499 French Comprehensive
1.00 credit
Required of all majors in their fourth year.
 
Lower Division
GERM 101 Elementary German I
4.00 credits
This course aims to develop in the student the four language skills: oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.
GERM 102 Elementary German II
4.00 credits
A continuation of GERM 101.
GERM 103 Intensive Introductory German
4.00 credits
This accelerated language course is designed to introduce students with previous German or other foreign language experience to basic German language skills and give them an insight into the many aspects of German speaking countries and their culture.
GERM 201 Intermediate German I
4.00 credits
Review and further training in the fundamentals of grammar and syntax; work in oral German and progressive exercises in reading and composition.
GERM 202 Intermediate German II
4.00 credits
A continuation of GERM 201.
GERM 290 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topics to be determined by faculty.
Upper Division
GERM 301 Advanced German
3.00 credits
Reading and discussion of short stories with writing and grammar review.
GERM 305 German Conversation
3.00 credits
Modern texts are the basis for structured conversations within a correct grammatical framework.
Prerequisite:
GERM 202 Minimum Grade: D
GERM 306 German Youth Literature
3.00 credits
This course focuses on popular texts written for children and young adults. Advanced grammar will be part of the course.
Prerequisite:
GERM 202 Minimum Grade: D
GERM 307 Contemporary Issues
3.00 credits
Reading and discussion of current social, political, economic and environmental issues of German speaking countries as represented by their media.
Prerequisite:
GERM 202 Minimum Grade: D
GERM 330 Literary Genres
3.00 credits
A study of examples of the major literary forms (prose, drama, and poetry) in their historical context.
Prerequisite:
GERM 202 Minimum Grade: D
GERM 380 Special Topics
.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor.
Prerequisite:
GERM 202 Minimum Grade: D
GERM 390 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Specific topic determined by professor.
GERM 480 Seminar
3.00 credits
Specific topic determined by professor.
GERM 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional experience in a supervised organizational setting allowing for the applied use of skills in German language and/or knowledge of German-speaking cultures. A maximum of three credits, with approval of the Department Chair, can be applied as upper division elective credits for the German minor.
 
Lower Division
ITAL 101 Elementary Italian I
3.00 credits
Grammar, composition, verbal practice and oral comprehension form the basis of this course. Designed to provide the student with the fundamentals of the Italian language. Fall (main campus) or Fall and Spring (Florence).
ITAL 101L Elementary Italian I Lab
.00- 1.00 credits
Taken only in conjunction with ITAL 101 when taken in Florence, Italy.
Concurrent:
ITAL 101
ITAL 102 Elementary Italian II
3.00 credits
A continuation of ITAL 101. Spring (main campus) or Fall and Spring (in Florence).
ITAL 102L Elementary Italian II Lab
.00- 1.00 credits
Taken only in conjunction with ITAL 102 when taken in Florence, Italy.
Concurrent:
ITAL 102
ITAL 105 Elementary Italian Convers I
3.00 credits
Students learn to use the language in a variety of everyday situations through focused practice in class and organized encounters with native speakers of Italian. Does not fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Second Language Proficiency requirement.
ITAL 106 Elementary Italian Convers II
3.00 credits
A continuation of ITAL 105. Vocabulary and grammar presented in Italian 102 are reinforced. Does not fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Second Language Proficiency requirement.
ITAL 190 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor.
ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian I
4.00 credits
This course will build on existing skills in Italian, increase the ability to read, write, speak and understand the language, and introduce students to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. Fall (main campus) or Fall and Spring (Florence).
ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian II
4.00 credits
A continuation of ITAL 201. Spring.
ITAL 290 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
Upper Division
ITAL 301 Advanced Italian I
3.00 credits
Advanced review of grammatical structures through conversation, readings, compositions and oral comprehension. In Italian.
ITAL 302 Advanced Italian II
3.00 credits
In Italian. Advanced review of grammatical structures through conversation, readings, presentations and oral comprehension. Can be taken alone or as a continuation of ITAL 301.
ITAL 303 Survey of Italian Literature I
3.00 credits
In Italian. An overview of Italian literature from the age of Dante through the Renaissance, including Petrarch, Boccaccio and Machiavelli.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 304 Survey: Italian Literature II
3.00 credits
In Italian. An overview of Italian literature from the Renaissance through contemporary times.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 306 Advanced Conversation
3.00 credits
In Italian. Advanced conversation for students returning from Florence.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 307 Conv Approach to Contemp Issue
3.00 credits
In Italian. A course designed for those who wish to continue to improve their conversational skills.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 308 Italian through Film
3.00 credits
This course uses Italian films to help students improve language proficiency and deepen their understanding of Italian history and culture. Italian cinema closely reflects national culture and each film in the course is chosen for its focus on one or more aspects of Italian society. Preparation for viewing includes background reading, thematic discussions and vocabulary building exercises. In Italian. Offered in Florence only.
ITAL 313 The World of Dante
3.00 credits
In English. In this course, students will engage with the history, philosophy, art, politics, and poetics of the Middle Ages through a close reading of Dante Alighieri's Commedia, Vita Nova, and other period texts. The course will also briefly consider the monumental cultural heritage that Dante's poem has and continues to produce. In class discussions, students will be expected to know, discuss, and offer interpretations of the text through their own reading and preparation based on notes provided by the instructor on Blackboard. This course will emphasize close reading of primarily poetic texts.
ITAL 314 Fascism in Film and Literature
3.00 credits
In English. This class examines the way fascism is presented in selected novels and films. An important objective of the course is to study the impact of Fascism on segments of the Italian population which did not conform to fascist ideals. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 315 The Italian Cinema
3.00 credits
In English. This course aims at presenting aspects of Italian society through film.
Equivalent:
INST 416 - OK if taken since Spring 2007
ITAL 316 The Italian Short Story I
3.00 credits
In Italian. The development of the Italian short story from its origin through the Baroque. Included are stories from the Novellino, the Decameron, the Novelliere, and the Pentameron.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 317 Italian Short Story II
3.00 credits
In Italian. The Italian short story through the works of the nineteenth and twentieth century authors.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 319 Mafia&PoliticViolence-Film/Lit
3.00 credits
In English. Through a study of Italian film, novels and nonfiction, this course will examine the phenomenon of organized crime in Italian society.
Equivalent:
INST 381 - Successful completion
ITAL 320 New Immigrants in Film &Lit
3.00 credits
In English. This course will explore the impact of immigration from Third World countries on Italian society through the study of novels, nonfiction and film. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian.
ITAL 322 The Italian Historical Novel
3.00 credits
In English. This course will explore the development of the historical novel in Italy with emphasis on modern historical novels. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
WOMS 324C - Successful completion
ITAL 330 Literary Genres
3.00 credits
In Italian. A study of examples of the major literary genres (narrative, dramatic, and poetic).
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 350 Italian Civilization & Culture
3.00 credits
In Italian. Readings and discussion of various aspects of Italian life such as art, cinema, politics, literature, history, fashions, etc.
ITAL 363 The Roman Republic
3.00 credits
In English. The political, social and cultural history of Republican Rome from its legendary origins to the Battle of Actium and its de facto end in 31 BC. The course will focus closely on the factors leading to the Republic’s successful rise as uncontested Mediterranean ruler as well as the internal political and social conflicts that brought the Republic crashing down to its ultimate fall.
Prerequisite:
HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
HIST 305 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
ITAL 364 The Roman Empire
3.00 credits
In English. The political, social and cultural history of Rome during the age of the Emperors, from Augustus' creation of the principate in 27 B.C. to the decline of the Roman Empire in the west by the 5th century AD. Special focus in this course will be given to the workings of the Imperial system, daily life in Rome and the provinces, the rise of Christianity, and the ultimate transformation of the empire.
Equivalent:
HIST 306 - OK if taken since Spring 2007
ITAL 366 Medieval Europe
3.00 credits
In English. Developments in the first flowering of Western European civilization, C.A.D. 500-1350, including feudalism, the rise of representative assemblies, the commercial revolution and the papal monarchy. Gonzaga in Florence only.
Equivalent:
HIST 311 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
ITAL 367 Renaissance Europe
3.00 credits
In English. The history of Western Europe circa 1350-1550, examining the political, religious, social, and economic context for the cultural achievements of the humanists, artists, dramatists, scientists, architects, and educators of the age of Joan of Arc, Michelangelo, the Tudors and the Medici.
Equivalent:
HIST 312 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
ITAL 380 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Selected topics in Italian language, literature, or civilization.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 390 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
ITAL 391 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
ITAL 440 Women in Italian Literature
3.00 credits
In English. This course examines the contribution of women novelists to Italian literature through the discussion of contemporary novels by women. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian.
ITAL 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
The internship provides students with the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills gained in the Italian classroom with a supervised organizational setting directly related to the student's major area of study. An internship plan (description, objectives, learning outcomes) is devised with an Italian faculty member, and approved by the Director of Italian Studies, before the internship begins.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 301 Minimum Grade: B or ITAL 302 Minimum Grade: B
ITAL 498 Senior Project
1.00 credit
Required of all Italian Studies majors. Permission from the Director of Italian Studies only.
 
Lower Division
JPNE 100 Japanese for Travelers
3.00 credits
Acquisition of useful vocabulary, phrases, sentence patterns for getting around in Japan. The students will acquire cultural understanding for better communication with Japanese speakers. Upon sufficient demand.
JPNE 101 Elementary Japanese I
4.00 credits
Grammar, composition, conversation, and discussion of cultural topics. Mastery of hiragana, katakana, and approximately 50 kanji (Chinese characters). Fall.
JPNE 102 Elementary Japanese II
4.00 credits
A continuation of JPNE 101. 150 kanji in addition to those introduced in JPNE 101. Spring.
JPNE 190 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor. May be repeated.
JPNE 201 Intermediate Japanese I
4.00 credits
Intensive oral work to develop fluency in the language; written composition and reading at the intermediate level. 200 kanji in addition to those introduced in JPNE 102. Fall.
JPNE 202 Intermediate Japanese II
4.00 credits
A continuation of JPNE 201. 200 kanji in addition to those introduced in JPNE 201. Spring.
JPNE 290 Japanese Tutoring
1.00 credit
This course is designed to train Japanese language tutors to assist Japanese language learners. The course focus is on practical experience. Tutors will meet regularly with their pupils. May be repeated for up to four credits.
JPNE 291 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor. May be repeated.
Upper Division
JPNE 301 Advanced Japanese I
3.00 credits
Intensive oral work to develop fluency in the language; written composition and reading at the advanced level. 200 kanji in addition to those introduced in JPNE 202.
JPNE 302 Advanced Japanese II
3.00 credits
A continuation of JPNE 301. 200 kanji in addition to those introduced in JPNE 301.
Prerequisite:
JPNE 301 Minimum Grade: D
JPNE 350 Japanese Culture I
3.00 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental Japanese culture. Some of the areas covered by this course will be human relations at work and in school, etiquette, customs, traditions and social issues. Taught in English.
Equivalent:
INST 360 - Successful completion
JPNE 351 Japanese Culture II
3.00 credits
This course focuses on Japanese values, attitudes and behaviors. The students will learn strategies for communication with Japanese people. Taught in English. Upon sufficient demand.
Equivalent:
INST 361 - OK if taken since Spring 2001
JPNE 380 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Selected topics in Japanese language, literature or civilization. May be repeated.
Prerequisite:
JPNE 202 Minimum Grade: D
JPNE 390 Directed Study
.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor. May be repeated.
JPNE 491 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Selected readings by arrangement. May be repeated.
JPNE 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional experience in a supervised organizational setting allowing for the applied use of skills in Japanese language and/or knowledge of Japanese-speaking cultures. A maximum of three credits with approval of the Department Chair, can be applied as upper division credits.
 
Lower Division
MDLA 190 Elementary Language
.00- 9.00 credits
Elementary language teaching.
MDLA 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by professor with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
MDLA 290 Intermediate Language
.00- 9.00 credits
Upper Division
MDLA 390 Advanced Language
.00- 9.00 credits
 
Lower Division
SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I
4.00 credits
Introduction to the fundamental language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish.
SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II
4.00 credits
A continuation of SPAN 101.
SPAN 180 Special Topics Beg Level
.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor.
SPAN 185 Special Topics Abroad Beg Levl
.00- 6.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor.
SPAN 190 Directed Study
1.00- 8.00 credits
Topic to be decided by professor.
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I
4.00 credits
Review of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax. In addition to work in spoken Spanish there are progressive exercises in reading and composition.
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II
4.00 credits
A continuation of SPAN 201.
SPAN 206 Spanish Conversation
3.00 credits
Development of oral expression in Spanish within a correct grammatical framework.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 102 Minimum Grade: D
SPAN 280 Special Topic Intermediate Lvl
1.00- 4.00 credits
By arrangement only. Topic selected by student-professor consultation.
SPAN 281 Special Topics
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic selected by professor.
SPAN 285 Special Topic Abroad Intrm Lvl
.00- 7.00 credits
SPAN 290 Spanish Grammar Review
3.00- 4.00 credits
Review of Spanish grammar.
SPAN 291 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor.
Upper Division
SPAN 301 Advanced Spanish I
3.00 credits
Advanced grammar. A review of specific grammatical constructions fundamental to •effective oral and written communication and proficiency in listening and reading skills through the lens of culture. This course focuses specifically on description, narration, and exposition.
SPAN 306 Advanced Conversation
3.00 credits
Designed for those who wish to continue improving their listening and speaking skills.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 301 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 309 Adv Spanish Grammar Review
3.00 credits
Exploration of and practice with complex grammatical structures in Spanish. This course is designed to consolidate the command of Spanish grammar and vocabulary through oral practice and classroom activities as well as through compositions and written exercises.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: D
SPAN 317 Translation: Principles & Prac
3.00 credits
This course is designed to be an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of translation principally from Spanish to English but also from English to Spanish. The student will learn the fundamentals of translating literary works, letters, legal documents, newspapers, commercial advertisements, and other materials.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 301 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 318 Med Span & Cutural Competency
3.00 credits
This course is designed for students planning to work in the health care field and who want to acquire more cultural and linguistic skills in medical Spanish. Students will develop new critical perspectives on health care for Hispanics in the US. Specifically, students will develop medical language skills and cultural competency for health care situations.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 301 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 319 Special Topic Language Adv Lvl
.00- 6.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor.
SPAN 320 Advanced Spanish II
3.00 credits
Advanced grammar, continuation of SPAN 301. A review of specific grammatical constructions fundamental to effective oral and written communication and proficiency in listening and reading skills through the lens of culture. This course focuses specifically critical thinking, argumentation and analysis.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 301 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 321 Span Medieval-Golden Age Lit
3.00 credits
This survey course is designed to give students a broad understanding of Spanish literature from its origins to the XVIII century. Students will study some key authors, philosophical and literary movements, historical and other elements that have shaped Spanish literary development. Students will also practice presentational and interpersonal oral skills and writing skills, in Spanish, while improving skills in literary analysis. This course if offered at least once every three years.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 322 Spanish Lit (18th C-21st C)
3.00 credits
This course presents a panoramic view of the history of modern Spanish literature (from 18th C to the present) in their historical and cultural context through the study in detail of some of the most significant literary works ( essay, drama, novel, short story, poetry) of the period.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 323 Lat Am Pre-Hisp 19th Ct Lit
3.00 credits
This course offers an introduction to the literature of the Spanish-speaking Americas.The texts students will read range from pre-Hispanic times until the end of the nineteenth century. During the semester, students will explore the various voices that arise from the Americas and how they present themselves in different genres such as: diary, chronicle, letter, essay, poetry, short story, and novel.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C
Equivalent:
INST 316 - Successful completion
SPAN 324 Latin Amer 19th-21st Cen Lit
3.00 credits
Span 324: Latin American 19th-21st Century Literature This course is designed to introduce students to the major trends and authors of Latin America during the contemporary period, starting at the end of the 19th Century and concluding with present-day works.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
Equivalent:
INST 317 - Successful completion
SPAN 325 Intro to Poetry in Spanish
3.00 credits
This course introduces students to the analytical tools of poetry analysis and provides a general survey of Spanish language poetry from its origins to the 21st century, covering poets from Spain and Latin America. Due to the scope of the material covered in this course, mostly canonical authors will be studied as a means to approach the philosophical and literary movements, historical and other cultural elements, that have shaped Spanish language literary development.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 328 Survey of Women's Literature
3.00 credits
Studies and analyzes a range of texts, including narrative fiction, poetry, drama, and/or essays written in Spanish by women writers. Texts may come from Spain and/or Latin America. Emphasis placed on literature from the 20th and 21st centuries.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 340 Spanish Civilization & Culture
3.00 credits
This course provides a general introduction to the history and culture( s) of Spain through an analysis of its social, political, and cultural characteristics from ancient times to the present. Special attention will be paid to Spain's art, music, architecture, social customs, and values.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 341 Latin-American Civ & Cultures
3.00 credits
This course offers an introduction to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking Americas from the precolonial period until present day. During the semester, students will explore various texts (written and visual) in order to examine the various manifestations of Latin American cultures.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 351 Latin American Cinema
3.00 credits
This course will focus on a series of representative Latin American films in order to explore issues of national formation and cultural identity. Emphasis will be given to the social, political, and economic factors which affect the production and reception of these films.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
Equivalent:
INST 414 - Successful completion
SPAN 352 Spanish Cinema
3.00 credits
This course provides an introduction to the history of Spanish cinema through the study of representative films of different historical periods (Francoist and/ or democratic period). Particular attention will be given to the historical, social, and cultural context of the production and reception of those movies, as well as to questions ofauthorship/genre, gender/sexuality, and national/cultural identity.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
Equivalent:
INST 415 - Successful completion
SPAN 360 Intro to Spanish Linguistics
3.00 credits
This course provides an introduction to Spanish linguistics and establishes the basis for the application of linguistic principles. The content included is an overview of linguistic rules with a focus on Spanish. The course begins with an introduction to the description and organization of data dealing with phonology (how sound patterns form words). Building on this, the discussion continues with topics in morphology (word formation and verbal inflection) and the description and organization of data dealing with syntax (how words combine to form phrases and sentences). Finally, the course ends by analyzing the regional variations of Spanish ( dialectology) where the students apply the first three concepts (phonology, morphology and syntax) to contrast and compare the regional categories of Spanish use world-wide including the following six modalities: Peninsular (Northern/Southern Spain), Atlantic (Canary Islands/Latin America), USA, Equatorial Guinea, Judeo-Spanish and Creoles.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 361 History of Spanish Language
3.00 credits
This course traces the development of the Spanish language from Latin to the present focusing upon the cultural, literary and historical factors that have contributed to its evolution from Latin to early Romance, and then to the Modem language. The course is divided into four parts: the lexical expansion Vulgar Latin to Classical Latin to modem Spanish elements; the development of the phonological system; the development of the written language from Alfonso El Sabio and Berceo to La Celestina, Valdes, Nebrija, and the language of the Golden Age; and, the overseas expansion of Spanish and Judeo-Spanish.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 362 Spanish Phonology & Phonetics
3.00 credits
This course examines the relationship between orthography (the way we spell Spanish) and the way it is pronounced. It also focuses on common orthographic errors, including spelling, accentuation and syllabification. In addition, it closely examines the sounds of Spanish (the phonetics) and the rules that govern the distribution of these sounds in the language (the phonology) and examines how these sounds vary across dialects and the linguistic and extralinguistic factors that contribute to this variation.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C or SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 380 Special Topics Advanced Level
.00- 6.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 385 Special Topics Abroad Adv Lvl
.00- 6.00 credits
Topic to be determined by professor.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 390 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by professor.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 320 Minimum Grade: C
SPAN 400 Spanish in the US
3.00 credits
This course familiarizes students with issues about language use in social contexts. Students will discuss results of research on the relationship between language and society in several Spanish-speaking communities, examine different types of linguistic and social variation, and learn methods to study such variation in monolingual and bilingual communities. Based on the readings, discussions and practice, students will have the opportunity to explore, discover and investigate the social nature of language.
SPAN 401 Second Language Acquisition
3.00 credits
This course is an introduction to the field of second language acquisition with an emphasis on speaking. The course format will include readings, discussions, and student presentations. It will examine speaking in a second language from several perspectives: theory, evaluation/testing, pedagogy, and materials.
SPAN 403 Spanish Theater
3.00 credits
Spanish theater from its origins to the present. Emphasis on the significance of the Golden Age of theater to the evolution of this genre.
SPAN 404 Spanish-American Theater
3.00 credits
Spanish American theatre from the pre-Hispanic period to the present. Emphasis placed on the contemporary period and the theater that evolved subsequent to the Modernist period.
SPAN 405 Narrative Fiction in Spain
3.00 credits
Analysis of the historical evolution of the novel and short story and their literary antecedents in Spain, from origins to the present.
SPAN 406 Narrative Fiction in Span Amer
3.00 credits
The novel and short story in Spanish America during the twentieth century.
SPAN 407 Peninsular Contemp Short Story
3.00 credits
This course focuses on Spanish short stories written in Spain or by Spaniards living in exile from the 1940s to the present. The course gives a panoramic vision of Spain’s recent history through a selection of short stories and also through the history of this genre in Spain, with a strong emphasis on women writers. We will take into consideration the main authors and movements of recent decades and analyze both the mechanisms that shape the genre, and its representations, especially in terms of gender discontinuities. The students will be exposed not only to short stories, but also to articles, films, interviews, and reflections and meditations by the writers themselves.
SPAN 411 Mexican Culture
3.00 credits
Summer session course in Mexico on Mexican society, art, history and literature.
SPAN 417 The Movies of Pedro Almodovar
3.00 credits
In this class, the film career of Pedro Almodovar (1949-), the most important Spanish filmmaker in recent decades, will be analyzed taking into account both the recent history of Spain and the history of the Spanish movie industry in the last 30 years. We will discuss several of his feature films and short films, as well as some of his writing. The topics of discussion will mainly focus on questions of identity in his movies, the relationship between his films and the cultural-political market of the democracy in Spain (the "Movida"), and the evolution of his movies in terms of cinematography, genre (from comedy to melodrama and lately, film noir), and gender representation. Film titles vary from semester to semester; however, could include films such as: Labyrinth of Passions (1982), Dark Habits (1983), What Have I Done to Deserve This?! (1984), Matador (1986), The Law of Desire (1987), Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (1988), High Heels (1991), All About my Mother (1999), Talk to Her (2002), Volver (2006), Broken Embraces (2009). This class will be conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 418 Spanish American Short Story
3.00 credits
This course will study the evolution of Spanish American short story from its appearance in the nineteenth century until today. Students will examine the manner in which this literary genre responded to the particular set of social, political, and economic considerations which shaped its production and reception. Students will read not only the texts themselves, but will also study critical theory surrounding the development of short story in Spanish America, and the regional responses which emerged.
SPAN 429 Latin American History
3.00 credits
SPAN 442 Contemp Latin Amer Women Lit
3.00 credits
Studies and analyzes narrative fiction, poetry, drama, and/or essays written by or about Latin American women writers. Emphasis placed on literature from the 20th and 21st centuries.
SPAN 470 Special Topics Study Abroad
3.00 credits
SPAN 471 The Hispanic Community in U.S.
3.00 credits
Social outreach course: readings on and volunteer work with Hispanic community.
SPAN 480 Seminar
3.00 credits
Specific topics to be chosen by professor.
SPAN 481 Seminar
3.00 credits
Specific topics to be chosen by professor.
SPAN 490 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Readings and reports on selected topics. By arrangement.
SPAN 491 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Readings and reports on selected topics. By arrangement.
SPAN 497 Spanish Language Internship
.00- 3.00 credits
Professional experience in a setting related to Hispanic communities and in which Spanish is often used. SPAN 497 does not count toward upper-division major/minor requirements. Student is responsible to find an appropriate internship and to present a plan (description, objectives, proposed assessment) to a Spanish professor for approval and supervision.
SPAN 499 Senior Capstone
1.00 credit
In this course students will demonstrate the knowledge they have learned via a portfolio that includes a language proficiency exam, a Spanish narrative that critically reflects upon the content acquired in the courses students completed toward the major, a reflective essay in English to measure the student learning outcome of intercultural competency, and an oral presentation. The Spanish narrative is designed to integrate and synthesize students' experiences in literature, culture, film and linguistics. The final grade will be (Satisfactory/Non- Satisfactory).
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.