Chemistry and Biochemistry

Chairperson: Maria Bertagnolli
Dr. Scholl Distinguished Professor: Joanne Smieja
Professors: D. Cleary, M. Cremeens, D. McMinn (Emeritus), K. Nakamaye (Emeritus), J. Shepherd, J. Smieja
Associate Professors: J. CronkG. Gidofalvi, E. Ross, S. Warren, J. Watson
Assistant Professors: W. BaileyS. Cravens, K. LeamyM. Matsumoto
Senior Lecturer: 
G. D’Ambruoso
Lecturers:
A. Scruggs, S. Siegel

The Department offers two degrees, two majors and one minor:

Bachelor of Science, Chemistry major (with ACS approved option)
Bachelor of Science, Biochemistry major (with ACS approved option) 
Bachelor of Science, Biochemistry major (non-ACS) 
Bachelor of Arts, Chemistry major
Minor in Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers Bachelor of Science degrees in Chemistry and Biochemistry and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry. There are three different Bachelor of Science (B.S.) programs, one in Chemistry and two in Biochemistry. The Chemistry program and one of the two Biochemistry programs have an option of being approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS). An ACS approved degree is recommended for students interested in pursuing a graduate degree in chemistry or biochemistry. The other B.S. Biochemistry degree has a larger biology emphasis, and is better suited for students seeking a broad background in both biochemistry and molecular biology. The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Chemistry is offered for students seeking a strong background in chemistry, but with less specialization than the Bachelor of Science program. A minor in Chemistry is also offered.

Students are encouraged to visit the departmental website to learn more about careers in Chemistry and Biochemistry. For those interested in teaching chemistry at the secondary level, the department suggests the B.A. degree along with the teacher certification program in the School of Education. For students interested in environmental science, a B.A. degree combined with a minor in Environmental Studies and supporting courses from Biology and Civil Engineering is recommended.

Although Gonzaga University does not offer a program in chemical engineering, students interested in chemical engineering are encouraged to combine a B.S. degree in Chemistry with supporting courses from the School of Engineering and Applied Science. This plan of study would position students to further their education with an M.S. or Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from an additional institution.

B.S. Major in Chemistry (with ACS approved option): 64-65 Credits

Lower Division
CHEM 101 General Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 101L General Chemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 230 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits
CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 credit
CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry II 3 credits
CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 credit
CHEM 245 Biochemistry
3 credits
CHEM 245L Biochemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 270 Career Development I 1 credit
MATH 157 Calculus-Analytic Geometry I 4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus-Analytic Geometry II 4 credits
PHYS 103 Scientific Physics I 4 credits
PHYS 103L Scientific Physics I Lab 1 credit
PHYS 204 Scientific Physics II 4 credits
PHYS 204L Scientific Physics II Lab 1 credit
Upper Division
CHEM 310 Analytical Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 310L Analytical Chemistry Lab 2 credits
CHEM 355 Physical Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 355L Physical and Inorganic Chemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 370 Career Development II 1 credit
CHEM 385L Advanced Chemistry Lab 3 credits
CHEM 399 Advanced Topic 2 credits
CHEM 405-435 Block 1 2 credits
CHEM 455-480 Block 2 2 credits
CHEM 405-435 and 455-480 Elective Block 4 credits
CHEM 485 Seminar 1 credit
One of the following options: 
 
CHEM 488 Senior Literature Review
1 credit
CHEM 498A/CHEM 498B Thesis I & II (Required for ACS
approved degree)
2 credits

B.S. Major in Biochemistry (with ACS approved option): 71-72 Credits

Lower Division
CHEM 101 General Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 101L General Chemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 230 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits
CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 credit
CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry II 3 credits
CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 credit
CHEM 245 Biochemistry 3 credits
CHEM 245L Biochemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 270 Career Development I 1 credit
BIOL 105 Information Flow in Biological Systems 3 credits
BIOL 105L Information Flow in Biological Systems Lab 1 credit
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biological Systems 3 credits
MATH 157 Calculus-Analytic Geometry I 4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus-Analytic Geometry II 4 credits
PHYS 103 Scientific Physics I 4 credits
PHYS 103L Scientific Physics I Lab 1 credit
PHYS 204 Scientific Physics II 4 credits
PHYS 204L Scientific Physics II Lab 1 credit
Upper Division
CHEM 310 Analytical Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 310L Analytical Chemistry Lab 2 credits
CHEM 345L Advanced Biochemistry Lab 3 credits
CHEM 355 Physical Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 355L Physical and Inorganic Chemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 370 Career Development II 1 credit
CHEM 399 Advanced Topic 2 credits
CHEM 405-435 Block 1 2 credits
CHEM 455-480 Block 2 2 credits
CHEM 405-435 and 455-480 Elective Block
4 credits
CHEM 485 Seminar 1 credit
One of the following options: 
 
CHEM 488 Senior Literature Review
1 credit
CHEM 498A/CHEM 498B Thesis I & II (Required for ACS
approved degree)
2 credits

B.S. Major in Biochemistry: 70-71 Credits

Lower Division
CHEM 101 General Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 101L General Chemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 230 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits
CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 credit
CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry II 3 credits
CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 credit
CHEM 245 Biochemistry 3 credits
CHEM 245L Biochemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 270 Career Development I 1 credit
BIOL 105 Information Flow in Biological Systems  3 credits
BIOL 105L Information Flow in Biological Systems Lab 1 credit
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biological Systems 3 credits
BIOL 207 Genetics 3 credits
BIOL 207L Genetics Lab 1 credit
MATH 157 Calculus-Analytic Geometry I 4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus-Analytic Geometry II 4 credits
PHYS 103 Scientific Physics I 4 credits
PHYS 204 Scientific Physics II 4 credits
Upper Division
CHEM 310 Analytical Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 310L Analytical Chemistry Lab 2 credits
CHEM 355 Physical Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 355L Physical and Inorganic Chemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 370 Career Development II 1 credit
CHEM 399 Advanced Topic 2 credits
CHEM 405-435 Block 1 2 credits
CHEM 455-480 Block 2 2 credits
BIOL 456 Molecular Biology 3 credits 
BIOL 456L Molecular Biology Lab
1 credit
CHEM 485 Seminar 1 credit
One of the following options:   
CHEM 488 Senior Literature Review
1 credit
CHEM 498A/CHEM 498B Thesis I & II
2 credits

B.A. Major in Chemistry: 55 Credits

Lower Division
CHEM 101 General Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 101L General Chemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 230 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits
CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I Lab  1 credit
CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry II 3 credits
CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 credit
CHEM 245 Biochemistry 3 credits
CHEM 245L Biochemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 270 Career Development 1 credit
MATH 157 Calculus-Analytic Geometry I
4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus-Analytic Geometry II 4 credits
One of the following two sets of courses:
8 credits
PHYS 101 and PHYS 102 General Physics I and II
 
PHYS 103 and PHYS 204 Scientific Physics I and II 
 
Upper Division
CHEM 310 Analytical Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 310L Analytical Chemistry Lab 2 credits
CHEM 355 Physical Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 355L Physical and Inorganic Chemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 370 Career Development II 1 credit
CHEM 399 Advanced Topic 2 credits
CHEM 405-435 Block 1 2 credits
CHEM 455-480 Block 2 2 credits
CHEM 485 Seminar 1 credit
CHEM 488 Senior Literature Review 1 credit

Minor in Chemistry: 32-37 Credits

Required Foundational Courses: 20 credits
CHEM 101 General Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 101L General Chemistry Lab 1 credit
CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry
3 credits
CHEM 230 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits
CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I Lab  1 credit
MATH 157 Calculus and Analytical Geometry I 4 credits
One of the following two courses: 4 credits
PHYS 101 General Physics I 
 
PHYS 103 Scientific Physics I 
 
One of the following three options: 12-17 credits
Option One:
12 credits
CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry II (3 credits)

CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry II Lab (1 credit)

CHEM 245 Biochemistry (3 credits)

CHEM 245L Biochemistry Lab (1 credit )

CHEM 399 or above (4 credits)

*Option Two: 
17 credits
CHEM 310 Analytical Chemistry (3 credits) 

CHEM 310L Analytical Chemistry Lab (2 credits)

CHEM 355 Physical Chemistry (3 credits)

CHEM 355L Physical and Inorganic Chemistry Lab (1 credit)

MATH 258 Calculus and Analytical Geometry II (4 credits)

PHYS 204 Scientific Physics II (4 credits)

Option Three:
13 credits
CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry II (3 credits)

CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry Lab (1 credit)

CHEM 310 Analytical Chemistry (3 credits)

CHEM 310L Analytical Chemistry Lab (2 credits)

CHEM 399 or above (4 credits) 

*Option Two Note: PHYS 204 + PHYS 205 will substitute for CHEM 355.
Physics majors who want to minor in Chemistry will need to take 14 credits
beyond the required foundational courses (CHEM 205, 230/230L, 310/310L, 355L)

Lower Division
CHEM 101 General Chemistry
3.00 credits
A systematic treatment of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry and their applications. Designed for science and engineering majors. Taken concurrently with CHEM 101L. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
CHEM 101L
CHEM 101L General Chemistry Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with CHEM 101. One laboratory per week. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
CHEM 101
CHEM 104 Scientific Inquiry
2.00 credits
This lecture and lab course content will be determined by the instructor to meet the learning objectives of the Scientific Inquiry requirement of the University Core. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
CHEM 104L
CHEM 104L Scientific Inquiry Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with CHEM 104. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
CHEM 104
CHEM 123 Environmental Chemistry
3.00 credits
This course will cover the fundamental principles of chemistry necessary to understand the source, transport, and fate of substances in the environment due to human activity. Additional topics will be chosen by the instructor but may include the environmental implications of various energy-generation methods; the chemistry of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere; climate change; and water quality, pollution, and treatment of water sources. Taken concurrently with CHEM 123L. Spring.
Concurrent:
CHEM 123L
CHEM 123L Environmental Chemistry Lab
1.00 credit
See CHEM 123 course description. Taken concurrently with CHEM 123. Spring.
Concurrent:
CHEM 123
CHEM 190 Study Abroad Special Topics
.00- 6.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
CHEM 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
CHEM 198 Topics in Chemistry
3.00 credits
This lecture-only course is designed for non-science majors. Different subfields of chemistry will be explored depending on the instructor. Upon sufficient demand.
CHEM 200L Basic Inorganic Chemistry Lab
1.00 credit
CHEM 200L is designed for students who need two semesters of general or inorganic chemistry lab for specific professional programs. Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 205 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry
3.00 credits
Introduction to foundational concepts in inorganic chemistry with emphasis on atomic structure, bonding, and reactivity. Topics will include nuclear chemistry, quantum mechanics, periodic trends, covalent bonding, ionic bonding, metallic bonding, coordinate covalent bonding, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, and thermodynamics. Three lectures per week. Fall.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 230 Organic Chemistry I
4.00 credits
Essential concepts in bonding and structure, acid-base chemistry, reactivity and synthesis of functional groups, nomenclature, and mechanisms of fundamental organic reactions. Three lectures and one recitation per week. Taken concurrently with CHEM 230L. Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 106 CHEM 230L
CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I Lab
1.00 credit
Preparation and analysis of representative organic compounds. One laboratory per week. Taken concurrently with CHEM 230. Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 101L Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 106 CHEM 230
CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry II
3.00 credits
Continuation of CHEM 230. A significant focus of the course will be on aromatic compounds and carbonyl chemistry. Other topics include organometallic chemistry, radicals, mass spectrometry and synthetic polymers. Three lectures per week. Fall.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
CHEM 231L
CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry II Lab
1.00 credit
Preparation and analysis of representative organic compounds. One laboratory per week. Fall.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 230L Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
CHEM 231
CHEM 245 Biochemistry
3.00 credits
Structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids). Fundamental concepts of protein structure and function, kinetics and enzymology, bioenergetics and thermodynamics, metabolism and regulation, will be discussed. Three lectures per week. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 231 Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 331 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
CHEM 245L
CHEM 245L Biochemistry Lab
1.00 credit
Laboratory methods and techniques relevant to biochemistry. One laboratory per week. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 231L Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 331L Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
CHEM 245
CHEM 270 Career Development I
1.00 credit
This course will introduce Chemistry and Biochemistry majors to research and career opportunities related to their major, the use of primary literature, and scientific ethics. One lecture per week. Spring.
CHEM 290 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
CHEM 295 Science Outreach
.00 credits
The Biology and Chemistry departments run a variety of outreach programs that include class visits, field trip tours, special summer programs and more. All of our programs strive to engage participants with opportunities for hands-on scientific discovery and inspiration.
Upper Division
CHEM 304 Practice in Lab Teaching
.00- 1.00 credits
Introduction to the methods of laboratory teaching. Emphasis on safety, time management, direct student-teacher interaction, and class presentation.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 310 Analytical Chemistry
3.00 credits
Principles of foundational analytical techniques and methods are presented in three lectures per week. These include gravimetric, volumetric, electrochemical, spectrometric, chromatographic, and mass spectrometry topics as well as basic descriptive statistics. Spring.
Prerequisite:
(CHEM 205 Minimum Grade: C- or CHEM 206 Minimum Grade: C-) and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
CHEM 310L
CHEM 310L Analytical Chemistry Lab
2.00 credits
Laboratory experiments including titrations, gravimetric analysis, molecular and atomic spectroscopy, potentiometry, and chromatography. Sample preparation, instrument calibration, data analysis, and reporting are emphasized. Two laboratory periods per week. Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 230L Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
CHEM 310
CHEM 345L Advanced Biochemistry Lab
3.00 credits
In-depth exploration of concepts and techniques used to study biomolecules and biomolecular systems with additional emphasis on scientific writing and communication in biochemistry. Two laboratories per week. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 245 Minimum Grade: D and CHEM 245L Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 355 Physical Chemistry
3.00 credits
Introduction to foundational concepts in physical chemistry with emphasis on quantum mechanics, gases, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Fall.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 310 Minimum Grade: C- and PHYS 204 Minimum Grade: D and PHYS 103 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
CHEM 355L
CHEM 355L Physical/Inorganic Chem Lab
1.00 credit
Experiments that emphasize synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds, as well as physical chemistry methods ranging from spectroscopy to thermodynamics and kinetics. One laboratory period per week. Fall.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 310L Minimum Grade: C- and PHYS 204 Minimum Grade: D and CHEM 205 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
CHEM 355
CHEM 370 Career Development II
1.00 credit
This course will focus on scientific oral presentations and scientific writing and will prepare the students for their senior project. This course will also include outside speakers from graduate schools and the chemistry and biochemistry industry to further provide educational opportunities about continued study and employment in the field. One lecture per week. Spring.
CHEM 385L Advanced Chemistry Lab
3.00 credits
In-depth laboratory course featuring projects, often interdisciplinary, within the analytical, inorganic, physical, and organic sub-disciplines of chemistry. Literature engagement and scientific writing are emphasized. Two laboratory periods per week. Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 355 Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 355L Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 390 Directed Research
.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
CHEM 395 Research Assistantship
.00 credits
Undergraduate research assistantships are opportunities for student to earn a stipend while performing independent research in the laboratory of a Biology or Chemistry & Biochemistry faculty member.
CHEM 399 Advanced Topics:
2.00 credits
CHEM 399 courses will focus on reading the primary literature in a particular content area, and will emphasize in-class discussion, writing, and/or presentations. Topics will vary. Two lectures per week. Fall and Spring. Prerequisites vary depending on topic.
CHEM 405 Special Topics in Chemistry
2.00 credits
Special topics in chemistry. Two lectures per week. Fall and Spring. Prerequisites vary depending on topic.
CHEM 407 Special Topics in Biochemistry
2.00 credits
Special topics in biochemistry. Two lectures per week. Fall and Spring. Pre-requisites vary depending on topic.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 245 Minimum Grade: D and CHEM 245L Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
CHEM 455 Special Topic in Chem/Biochem
2.00 credits
Special topics in Chemistry or Biochemistry. Fall and Spring. Additional prerequisites may be required depending on topic.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 355 Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 485 Seminar
1.00 credit
Required of all Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. Fall.
CHEM 488 Senior Literature Review
1.00 credit
Literature review of special chemical problem or topic under the direction of a faculty member. Fall or Spring. By Department Chair permission only.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 370 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 490 Directed Reading
.00- 3.00 credits
Material and credit to be arranged by instructor.
CHEM 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional work experience in a chemistry-related field.
CHEM 498A Thesis I
1.00 credit
Investigation of special chemical problems and topics under the direction of a faculty member. Required for ACS approved B.S. degrees. Fall.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 370 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 498B Thesis II
1.00 credit
Required for ACS approved B.S. degrees. Continuation of CHEM 498A. Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 498A Minimum Grade: D
 
Second Language Competency

Competency in a second language (classical or modern) at the intermediate level (courses numbered 201) is required for students continuing in the study of a language. Students beginning study in a language they have not previously studied can fulfill the requirement by completing one year at the beginning level (courses numbered 101-102). Non-native speakers of English who have completed the required English core credits at Gonzaga may petition the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences for a waiver of this requirement.

Additional information on this requirement can be found at

Language Requirement Information

 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.