International Studies

Chairperson: Torunn Haaland

International Studies is a multi-disciplinary department preparing students for a variety of careers with an international dimension.  It offers two courses of study:  International Relations and Region Studies. International Relations offers students a broad curriculum in foreign relations and cultures to prepare students for careers and post-graduate education in foreign service, diplomacy, security studies, peace and conflict resolution, and international development. Region Studies provide students with a more focused program of study in one of three regions:  Asia, Europe or Latin America.  

International Studies degrees are designed to support Gonzaga University’s mission to foster “a mature commitment to dignity of the human person, social justice, diversity, intercultural competence, global engagement, solidarity with the poor and vulnerable, and care for the planet.”  They are also committed to the College of Arts and Sciences' vision of “engaging with meaningful problems in our local and global communities and pursuing the cause of social justice.”

Majors Offered:

A Bachelor of Arts degree with majors and minors in: International Studies: International Relations, International Studies: Asian Studies; International Studies: European Studies, International Studies: Latin American Studies.  Total credits for all B.A.s:  28-44 credits (depending on starting point for foreign language study).  Total credits for all minors:  15-31 credits (depending on starting point for foreign language).

Master of Arts in Communication and Leadership Studies (COML) and Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership (ORGL) 4+1 Program:

Majors interested in pursuing a Master of Arts in Communication and Leadership Studies (COML) or a Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership (ORGL) may apply to the graduate program at the end of the academic year immediately preceding their final year of undergraduate study. Those who meet the COML or ORGL admissions standards will be granted provisional acceptance. During their final year of undergraduate study, these students will be able to enroll in up to six graduate-level COML or ORGL credits in addition to their undergraduate course load, with no additional or separate charge for graduate credits. "4+ 1" students will be limited to a maximum of 18 credits per semester, including graduate credits, in each of the two semesters of their final year of undergraduate study.

Multiple Usage and Transfer Credit Policies:

Students may only double-count a maximum of three courses between International Studies and degree requirements for a second major or minor.  Electives may not be used to fulfill any other degree requirement.  Transfer courses, including courses taken through study abroad programs may be used to fulfill degree requirements upon prior approval of the Department Chair.

Language Requirements:

Because foreign language skills are such a vital part of an International Studies education, all International Studies majors and minors should discuss their plans for foreign language study with the International Studies Department Chair as early as possible, i.e., the summer before matriculation or upon declaring their major or minor.

Students are encouraged to continue studying a language they studied before coming to Gonzaga in order to maximize their proficiency.  Region studies majors and minors (i.e., Asian Studies, European Studies, Latin American Studies) must study a foreign language used in their region of study.

All International Studies majors must take at least 6 credits of foreign language study during their time at Gonzaga at the 300 level or higher.  In the case of languages not offered at Gonzaga or offered to only the 200 level, students can acquire intermediate proficiency by studying abroad in 6-week intensive language programs or semester-long programs.  They may also enroll in intensive language study in the United States at, e.g., at the Middlebury Institute or at other accredited universities that specialize in the study of language and culture of their region of interest.

Degree Requirements :

All International Studies majors and minors must take:

INST 201 Introduction to International Studies 3 credits
INST 401 Perspectives on Global Issues 3 credits

All International Studies majors must take:

INST 499 Senior Capstone 1 credit

International Studies: International Relations Majors and Minors:

International Studies: International Relations majors must take three International Interactions electives and two International Differences electives. International Studies: International Relations minors must take two International Interactions electives and one International Differences elective.

International Interactions electives
   Majors: 9 credits; Minors: 6 credits
INST 303 International Interactions Topic* 3 credits
INST 305 Religion and Violence 3 credits
  INST 320 Resistance, Struggle & Power 3 credits
  INST 332 Politics of Space and Place 3 credits
INST 342 International Relations 3 credits
INST 343 Global Economic Issues 3 credits
INST 344 International Organizations 3 credits
INST 345 International Law 3 credits
INST 347 International Treaties 3 credits
INST 350 International Ethics 3 credits
  INST 351 Politics of Social Memory 3 credits
INST 356 The U.S. in the World 3 credits
INST 371 History of the Modern Middle East 3 credits
INST 372 Colonial Latin America 3 credits
INST 373 Modern East Asian Civilization 3 credits
INST 376 Russia and USSR Since 1945 3 credits
INST 385 Latin American Politics 3 credits
INST 387 Europe 1918-1939 3 credits
INST 389 Politics of the Pacific Rim 3 credits
INST 390 African Politics and Development 3 credits
INST 393 The New Europe 3 credits
INST 394 Modern Latin America 3 credits
INST 399 Region Studies Abroad* 3 credits
  INST 430 Intersectional Communication 3 credits
  INST 440 Rhetoric of Social Change 3 credits
INST 480 Topics in International Studies* 1-3 credits
INST 497 Internship in International Studies 0-6 credits
HIST 325 World War I 3 credits
HIST 330 The Holocaust 3 credits
HIST 331 World War II 3 credits
HIST 335 Eastern Europe Since 1863 3 credits
HIST 340 The Cold War 3 credits
POLS 319 American Foreign Policy 3 credits
POLS 373 Arab-Israeli Conflict 3 credits
   POLS 375 Global Environmental Politics 3 credits

International Differences electives
  Majors: 6 credits; Minors: 3 credits
   INST 302 Topics in InternationalDifferences 3 credits
INST 304 Interreligious Dialogue 3 credits
INST 310 Third World Development 3 credits
INST 315 Latin American Society 3 credits
INST 325 Post-Soviet Russia and China 3 credits
INST 326 Global Gender Regimes 3 credits
INST 330 Religions of Asia 3 credits
INST 346 Parliamentary Government 3 credits
INST 355 The Politics of Eurasia 3 credits
INST 368 Islamic Civilization 3 credits
INST 369 Revolutions in Modern Latin America 3 credits
INST 386 Europe in the 19th Century 3 credits
INST 392 Tyranny to Democracy 3 credits
INST 395 Comparative European Politics 3 credits
INST 399 Region Studies Abroad 3 credits
INST 480 Topics in International Studies 1-3 credits
INST 497 Internship in International Studies 0-6 credits
POLS 370 Modern Democracies (Florence)
3 credits
POLS 372 Middle East Politics 3 credits

Note: 

  • * - Courses with an asterisk following the course number must cover content relevant to the students chosen region of study.
  • INST 497 Internship – This course must be taken for three credits, approved by the International Studies Department Chair, and cover content relevant to the students chosen region of study in order to be used as a major elective.

International Studies: Asian Studies Majors and Minors

International Studies: Asian Studies majors must take one of the following courses: 3 credits
INST 373 Modern East Asian Civilization
INST 384 Foundations of East Asian Civilization
INST 389 Politics of the Pacific Rim

International Studies: Asian Studies majors must take four Asian Studies electives. Asian Studies minors must take three Asian Studies electives:

Asian Studies electives:
 Major: 12 credits; Minors: 9 credits
INST 302 Topics in International Differences*
INST 310 Third World Development (3 credits)
INST 325 Post-Soviet Russia and China (3 credits)
INST 326 Global Gender Regimes (3 credits)
INST 330 Religions of Asia (3 credits)
INST 333 Buddhism (3 credits)
INST 343 Global Economic Issues (3 credits)
INST 344 International Organizations (3 credits)
INST 347 International Treaties (3 credits)
INST 360 Japanese Culture I (3 credits)
INST 361 Japanese Culture II (3 credits)
INST 362 Introduction to Chinese Culture (3 credits)
INST 368 Islamic Civilization (3 credits)
INST 371 History of the Modern Middle East (3 credits)
INST 373 Modern East Asian Civilization (3 credits)
INST 374 China Past and Present (3 credits)
INST 375 Japan Past and Present (3 credits)
INST 384 Foundations of East Asian Civilization (3 credits)
INST 389 Politics of the Pacific Rim (3 credits)
INST 392 Tyranny to Democracy (3 credits)
INST 396 Chinese Philosophy (3 credits)
INST 399 Region Studies Abroad* (3 credits)
INST 480 Topics in International Studies* (1-3 credits)
INST 497 Internship in International Studies (0-6 credits)
HIST 331 World War II (3 credits)
HIST 340 The Cold War (3 credits)
HIST 374 Maoist China (3 credits)
HIST 376 Tokugawa Japan (3 credits)
HIST 378 Zen, Modernity and the Counterculture (3 credits)
MKTG 417 International Marketing (3 credits)
PHIL 416 Marxism (3 credits)
POLS 372 Middle East Politics (3 credits)
   POLS 373 Arab-Israeli Conflict (3 credits)

Note: 

  • * - Courses with an asterisk following the course number must cover content relevant to the students chosen region of study.
  • INST 497 Internship – This course must be taken for three credits, approved by the International Studies Department Chair, and cover content relevant to the students chosen region of study in order to be used as a major elective.

International Studies: European Studies Majors and Minors

International Studies: European Studies majors must take one of the following three courses: 3 credits
INST 386 Europe in the Nineteenth Century
INST 387 Europe, 1914-1939
   INST 395 Comparative European Politics

International Studies: European Studies majors must take four European Studies electives. International Studies: European Studies minors must take three European Studies electives.

European Studies electives:
  Major: 12 credits; Minor 9 credits
Take an additional 12 credits of INST or approved related courses not used to satisfy any of the requirements above.
   INST 302 Topics in International Differences* (3 credits)
INST 325 Post-Soviet Russia and China (3 credits)
INST 326 Global Gender Regimes (3 credits)
INST 339 French Cinema (3 credits)
INST 343 Global Economic Issues (3 credits)
INST 344 International Organizations (3 credits)
INST 346 Parliamentary Government (3 credits)
INST 347 International Treaties (3 credits)
INST 376 Russia and the USSR Since 1945 (3 credits)
INST 381 Mafia and Political Violence in Film and Literature (3 credits)
INST 383 Age of the French Revolution (3 credits)
INST 386 Europe in the 19th Century (3 credits)
INST 387 Europe, 1914-1939 (3 credits)
INST 388 19th Century Germany (3 credits)
INST 391 Fascist Italy (3 credits)
INST 392 Tyranny to Democracy (3 credits)
INST 393 The New Europe (3 credits)
INST 395 Comparative European Politics (3 credits)
INST 397 Hitler’s Germany (3 credits)
INST 398 Modern Britain (3 credits)
INST 399 Region Studies Abroad* (3 credits)
INST 415 Spanish Cinema (3 credits)
INST 416 The Italian Cinema (3 credits)
INST 480 Topics in International Studies* (1-4 credits)
INST 497 Internship in International Studies (0-6 credits)
HIST 325 World War I (3 credits)
HIST 330 The Holocaust (3 credits)
HIST 331 World War II (3 credits)
HIST 333 Tsarist Russia (3 credits)
HIST 335 Eastern Europe since 1863 (3 credits)
HIST 340 The Cold War (3 credits)
MGMT 352 International Management (3 credits)
PHIL 416 Marxism (3 credits)
POLS 357 Italian Political System (3 credits) (Florence)
POLS 370 Modern Democracies (3 credits) (Florence)
SOCI 478 Social and Economic Development of Italy (3 credits) (Florence)

Note: 

  • * - Courses with an asterisk following the course number must cover content relevant to the students chosen region of study.
  • INST 497 Internship – This course must be taken for three credits, approved by the International Studies Department Chair, and cover content relevant to the students' chosen region of study in order to be used as a major elective.

International Studies: Latin American Studies Majors and Minors

All International Studies: Latin American Studies majors must take one of the following two courses: 3 credits
   INST 385 Latin American Politics
INST 394 Modern Latin America

International Studies: Latin American Studies majors must take four Latin American Studies electives. International Studies: Latin American Studies minors must take three Latin American Studies electives.

Latin American Studies electives:
   Majors: 12 credits; Minors 9 credits
 
   INST 302 Topics in International Studies* (3 credits)
INST 310 Third World Development (3 credits)
INST 315 Latin American Society (3 credits)
INST 316 Survey of Latin American Literature I (3 credits)
INST 317 Survey of Latin American Literature II (3 credits)
INST 326 Global Gender Regimes (3 credits)
INST 343 Global Economic Issues (3 credits)
INST 344 International Organizations (3 credits)
INST 347 International Treaties (3 credits)
INST 369 Revolutions in Modern Latin America (3 credits)
INST 372 Colonial Latin America (3 credits)
INST 377 Mexico (3 credits)
INST 385 Latin American Politics (3 credits)
INST 392 Tyranny to Democracy (3 credits)
INST 394 Modern Latin America (3 credits)
INST 399 Region Studies Abroad (3 credits)
INST 406 Narrative Fiction in Spanish America (3 credits)
INST 415 Spanish Cinema (3 credits)
INST 480 Topics in International Studies* (1-3 credits)
INST 497 Internship in International Studies (0-6 credits)
HIST 384 Women in Colonial Latin America (3 credits)
PHIL 416 Marxism (3 credits)


Lower Division
INST 190 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
INST 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
INST 201 Intro to International Studies
3.00 credits
This course provides an introduction to the multi-disciplinary field of International Studies. Required for all International Studies majors and minors. Recommended for any first or second year student from any program of study with an interest in international affairs.
INST 285 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Selected International Studies topics of current and special interest.
INST 290 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Upper Division
INST 302 Top: International Difference
3.00 credits
This course number designates special topics which are offered on occasion as full semester courses by faculty members from the various disciplines which make up the International Studies Program. Such courses focus on subjects of current or special interests which are not normally a part of the regular curriculum and focus on international differences (e.g., cultural, political, economic) and particular regions of the world. International Differences Elective; region studies elective (topic must pertain to region of Major/Minor Study).
INST 303 Top:International Interactions
3.00 credits
This course number designates special topics which are offered on occasion as full semester courses by faculty members from the various disciplines which make up the International Studies Program. Such courses focus on subjects of current or special interests which are not normally a part of the regular curriculum and focus on international interactions among nations and/or organizations, international law, treaties, etc. International Interactions elective.
INST 304 Interreligious Dialogue
3.00 credits
Investigates the imperative of Christianity and other world religions to engage in respectful dialogue and mutual understanding, exposes pressing practical issues such as religious violence and divisive ideologies, and proposes a comparative theological perspective highlighting spiritual engagement, moral responsibility and reconciliation.
Equivalent:
RELI 350 - OK if taken since Spring 2016
SOSJ 365 - OK if taken since Spring 2016
INST 305 Religion and Violence
3.00 credits
This course investigates various examples of religious group violence and consults a variety of religious responses to the same by investigating a range of sources: sacred texts, theological and ethical traditions, along with films, podcasts, and webinars analyzing a range of events from the early twentieth century through present day. International Differences elective.
INST 310 Third World Development
3.00 credits
Focus on political development in the Third World. After examining the making of the Third World through imperialism and colonialism, analyzes key political institutions (the state, political parties, the military), international economic context of dependency and vulnerability. Several case studies follow a common analytical framework to trace experiences with democratic and authoritarian rule and assess the underlying causes of democratic success and failure. International Differences elective. Equivalents: POLS 359 and SOSJ 329
Equivalent:
POLS 359 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
SOSJ 329 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
INST 315 Latin American Society
3.00 credits
An overview of Latin American development. Several socio-economic factors are examined. Development issues are broadly conceptualized within economic, demographic, and cultural dimensions. These variables are viewed as overlapping forces influencing development. International Differences elective. Equivalent: SOCI 322.
Equivalent:
SOCI 322 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 316 Latin American Literature I
3.00 credits
A study of the region's literary classics from the pre-Columbian period to the Independence in the early 19th century. Fall, alternate years. International Differences elective. (Taught in Spanish).
Prerequisite:
SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
SPAN 307 - OK if taken since Fall 2001
INST 317 Survey Latin-American Lit II
3.00 credits
A study of the major literary works from the Independence period through Modernism and the classic works of the 20th century contemporary period. Spring, alternate years. International Differences elective. (Taught in Spanish.)
Prerequisite:
SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
SPAN 308 - OK if taken since Spring 2001
INST 320 Resistance, Struggle, & Power
3.00 credits
Communication is the central means for contesting and reconfiguring structural forms of power relations among social groups, and this class focuses on power dynamics and imbalances across social institutions such as law, education, medicine, economics, media, and religion. Students engage the concepts of hegemony (the production of consent for dominant power relationships) and counter-hegemony (the struggle against dominant social arrangements). As such, the course invites students to consider the interplay of communication, culture, and social institutions in maintaining, resisting, and transforming the persistent inequalities of power and disproportionate distribution of cultural and political capital. Fall.
Prerequisite:
COMM 210 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 220 Minimum Grade: C and (COMM 275 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 285 Minimum Grade: C)
INST 325 Post-Soviet Russia and China
3.00 credits
Focus on the pre-1985 Soviet political system; how Gorbachev's six-year reform program led to the unraveling of the Soviet Union; and the difficult transition to democracy and a market economy in post-Soviet Russia. Similarly, contrasts Maoist China with the uneasy mixture of economic reform and political repression coexisting in China today. International Differences elective.Equivalent: POLS 355.
Equivalent:
POLS 355 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 326 Global Gender Regimes
3.00 credits
Compares the lives of women around the world: their public and private roles and responsibilities, positions in government, the economy, and the private sphere. Seeks to explain women's status differences in various regions and societies by looking at the influence of culture, religion, economics, and politics. International Differences elective. Equivalent: POLS 363 or WGST 342.
Equivalent:
POLS 363 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
WGST 342 - OK if taken since Fall 2009
INST 330 Religions of Asia
3.00 credits
This course surveys Indian (Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, Sikh), Chinese (Confucian, Daoist), or Japanese (Shinto, Zen) religious traditions, with attention to: conceptions of ultimate reality; the human condition; liberation; human effort and faith; inner mystical experience and social ethics; sex and gender; interreligious dialogue and peace. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
RELI 351 - Successful completion
INST 332 Politics of Space and Place
3.00 credits
Everyday encounters with physical surroundings guide our orientations to the world. As we wander city streets, shopping malls, stadiums, nature preserves, sacred sites, restaurants, monuments, museums, and classroooms, we examine how we move in, and are moved by the material arenas we share. Spatial organization and built environments inform our habits of perception, determine the meaning of a particular place, accent what is worth attention and what might be overlooked, and reaffirm dominant norms and power relationships in public culture. Charts, maps, apps, and other navigational tools dictate where and how we move, and how we understand our roles within a given space. Featuring the experiential dimensions of rhetoric and communication, this course presses us to consider how material spaces and places construct everyday geographies. Spring.
Prerequisite:
COMM 210 Minimum Grade: C and (COMM 275 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 285 Minimum Grade: C)
Equivalent:
COMM 330 - OK if taken since Fall 2018
INST 333 Buddhism
3.00 credits
Surveys Buddhism as an Asian spirituality and world religion with a focus on skillful reading of primary source materials. We will examine the Buddha's life, teachings, diagnosis of the human condition and path toward Awakening, the expansion and development of those teachings in Buddhist communities and apply Buddhist thought to moral issues in contemporary experience ('Socially Engaged Buddhism'). International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
RELI 353 - Successful completion
INST 339 Contemporary French Cinema
3.00 credits
A study of French cinema as it has evolved in the last two decades. The films viewed will be used as a means to encourage reflection on the history, ideas and values that have gone into the making of modern France. The course is offered in English and French in separate sections. For students who take the English section of the course through the INST cross-listing, there is no French pre-requisite. International Differences elective. Spring. Equivalent: FREN 331.
Equivalent:
FREN 331 - Successful completion
INST 342 International Relations
3.00 credits
Theory and practice of the international political system and the behavior of the participating nations.
Equivalent:
POLS 351 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 343 Global Economic Issues
3.00 credits
This course is a presentation of a broad range of global economic issues and policies relevant to a number of disciplines including business, political science, and international studies. Topics include: why nations trade, international trade and economic growth, protectionism, discriminatory trade policies, the foreign exchange market, factor mobility, and comparative economic systems. International Interactions elective. Fall and Spring. Equivalent: ECON 311.
Prerequisite:
ECON 201 Minimum Grade: D or ECON 270H Minimum Grade: D or ECON 200 Minimum Grade: D or ECON 207H Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
ECON 311 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 344 International Organizations
3.00 credits
Examines why international organizations exist and whether they make a difference in solving global problems. Questions to be addressed include: Where does their power come from? Why are some designed differently than others? Why do countries use international organizations to achieve their goals? Are they effective? Practical knowledge about the major ones such as the U.N., European Union, World Trade Organization, and NGOs. Their successes and failures about specific global problems such as conflict, human rights and development. International Interactions elective. Equivalent: POLS 376.
Equivalent:
POLS 376 - OK if taken since Spring 2010
INST 345 International Law
3.00 credits
International law with an international relations focus. How and why international treaties and other sources of international laws are created; actors who create, interpret, and enforce them. Structures for increasing compliance and their effectiveness. Variety of major international treaties and laws: war, sea, trade, and human rights. International Interactions elective. Equivalent: 371.
Equivalent:
POLS 371 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 346 Parliamentary Government
3.00 credits
Parliamentary or Cabinet government contrasted with the American government. Focus on disciplined parties, prime ministers, civil servants, and elected politicians, written and unwritten constitutional rules, parliamentary supremacy and rights-based politics. Usually features Canada but draws examples from Great Britain, New Zealand, India, and Australia. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
POLS 360 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 347 International Treaties
3.00 credits
Examines international treaties: why they exist, origins of their power, different designs, uses made of them, effectiveness. Covers such examples as NATO, NAFTA, Kyoto Protocol. Their successes and failures about specific problems. International Interactions elective. Equivalent: POLS 377.
Equivalent:
POLS 377 - OK if taken since Fall 2011
INST 350 International Ethics
3.00 credits
The moral structure of the international community in the context of problems such as war, foreign aid, and transnational migration. International Interactions elective. Equivalent: PHIL 453.
Prerequisite:
PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
PHIL 453 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 351 Politics of Social Memory
3.00 credits
The ways we remember our collective past influence our present and shape our futures. This course examines how we rhetorically construct and struggle over social memory through public remembrances of historical events via war memorials, film and documentary, commemorative celebrations, reenactments, monuments, and museum exhibits. Students extend rhetorical and visual theoretical concepts and methods to evaluate sites of public memory and the social and cultural politics shaping the construction of memory. Fall.
Prerequisite:
COMM 210 Minimum Grade: C and COMM 220 Minimum Grade: C and (COMM 275 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 285 Minimum Grade: C)
Equivalent:
COMM 350 - OK if taken since Fall 2018
INST 355 The Politics of Eurasia
3.00 credits
We will begin by developing our understanding of democracy and then proceed to explore the political, economic and social development of several countries of Central and Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia over time. What explains the various fates of the countries in this region? Political culture/history? Political agency? Proximity to "the West" and diffusion of norms? International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
POLS 369 - OK if taken since Fall 2014
INST 356 The U.S. in the World
3.00 credits
This course will introduce you to the history of the United States in its global context. In order to situate the United States within its world, this course explores the interconnections between domestic beliefs, national policy, and international events. International Interactions elective.
Prerequisite:
HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
HIST 368 - OK if taken since Fall 2014
INST 360 Japanese Culture I
3.00 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental Japanese culture. Some of the areas covered by this course will be human relations at work and in school, etiquette, customs, traditions and social issues. (This course will be taught in English). International Differences elective. Equivalent: JPNE 350.
Equivalent:
JPNE 350 - OK if taken since Fall 2001
INST 361 Japanese Culture II
3.00 credits
This course focuses on Japanese values, attitudes and behaviors. The students will learn strategies for communication with Japanese people. (This course will be taught in English). International Differences elective. Equivalent: JPNE 351.
Equivalent:
JPNE 351 - OK if taken since Spring 2001
INST 362 Intro to Chinese Culture
3.00 credits
This course is designed thematically and aims to acquaint students with important aspects of Chinese culture. The course will help students better understand modern China, which is shaped by five thousand years of tradition and interaction with the world. Topics include: contemporary china, brief history, religion and philosophy, and art and literature. The course assumes no previous knowledge of China or the Chinese language and will be taught in English. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
CHIN 350 - OK if taken since Spring 2010
INST 368 Islamic Civilization
3.00 credits
This course examines the history of Islam from the time of the Prophet Muhammad to the great Islamic 'gunpowder empires' of the early modern period. Specific topics covered include the Qur'an, the practices and beliefs of the faith, and an examination of the intersection between faith and culture. The course also includes an introduction to key issues related to Islam in the contemporary world. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
HIST 348 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
RELI 354 - Successful completion
INST 369 Revolutions in Mod Latin Amer
3.00 credits
This course examines the origins, emergence, process, and consequences of major Latin American social and political revolutions in the twentieth century. It will investigate a variety of types of revolutions including different urban and rural movements, as well as groups that sought radical change from high politics to the grass roots level. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
HIST 382 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 371 History of Modern Middle East
3.00 credits
The development of the Middle East from the middle of the nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. Topics covered include the end of the Ottoman and Qajar Empires, the creation of the contemporary states of the Middle East at the end of World War I, and their history from 1920 through the end of the twentieth century. International Interactions elective.
Equivalent:
HIST 349 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 372 Colonial Latin America
3.00 credits
A survey of colonial Latin America that examines the contact, conflict, and accommodation among Europeans. Native Americans, and Africans that shaped colonial Latin America. International Interactions elective.
Equivalent:
HIST 380 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
NTAS 341 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
INST 373 Modern East Asian Civilization
3.00 credits
This course is a focused integrated survey of East Asian civilization since the Late Ming period of China (c. 1600 A.D.). Using the standard interpretive categories of politics, economics, society, and culture, the course will explore the historical inter-relationships between the rise of the Manchu (Qing) Dynasty and the unification of Japan; the historical inter-relationships between East Asian societies and western commercial expansion, including overseas missions to China and Japan; the explosion of western imperialism in the nineteenth century, including the Opium War and Taiping Rebellion; Japanese imperialism in China and Korea; the historical inter-relationships between Chinese communism and Japanese militarism; East Asia in the Cold War and the pop-cultural influence on East Asia on the modern west. Students who take this course for International Studies credit will be required to do an extra writing assignment that integrates the material of this course with their International Studies focus. It is desired but not required that students will have taken History 112 (World Civilizations Since 1500) prior to taking this course. International Interactions elective.
Equivalent:
HIST 375 - OK if taken since Fall 2009
INST 374 Modern China
3.00 credits
This course is a focused survey of Chinese history from the Shang Dynasty (c. 1600 B.C.) up to the present. Using the standard interpretive categories of politics, economics, society, and culture, the course will explore such topics as pre-imperial China; the Qin-Han consolidations and breakdowns; pre-modern Imperial China (Jin, Sui, Tang, Song, including inter-dynasty kingdoms); the Mongol (Yuan) dynasty; early modern and modern imperial China (Ming and Qing); and the Revolutionary periods of the twentieth century, including the Guomindang era, Maoism, and Post-Mao modernizations. Students who take this course for International Studies credit will be required to do an extra writing assignment that integrates the material of this course with their International Studies focus. It is desired but not required that students will have taken HIST 112 (World Civilizations Since 1500) prior to taking this course. Students who take this class as a History course may not use or substitute the credits for International Studies. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
HIST 371 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 375 Modern Japan
3.00 credits
This course is a focused survey of Japanese history from the Jomon Period (c. 14,000 B.C) up to the present. Using the standard interpretive categories of politics, economics, society, and culture, the course will explore such topics as the Jomon and Yayoi classical ages; the Yamato, Nara, and Heian aristocratic ages; the Kamakura, Ashikaga, and Tokugawa warrior ages, and the modern period from the Meiji Restoration through the twentieth century. Students who take this course for International Studies credit will be required to do an extra writing assignment that integrates the material of this course with their International Studies focus. It is desired but not required that students will have taken History 112 (World Civilizations Since 1500) prior to taking this course. Students who take this class a History course may not use or substitute the credits for International Studies. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
HIST 372 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 376 Russia & USSR Since 1945
3.00 credits
This course may be considered an autopsy on the Soviet empire. Its themes include: "developed" socialism under Stalin's successors; the rise and decline of the Soviet economy; the Cold War; the Soviet Union's nationalities issues; the impact of Gorbachev's reforms; and the collapse of the USSR. The course will also consider the domestic and foreign policy challenges faced by Yeltsin and Putin after 1991. International Differences elective.
Prerequisite:
HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112H Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
HIST 334 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 377 Mexico
3.00 credits
A survey of Mexican history from the Aztec wars to the present. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
HIST 383 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 381 Mafia&Pol Violence in Film&Lit
3.00 credits
Through a study of Italian film, novels and nonfiction, this course will examine the phenomenon of organized crime in Italian society. In English. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
ITAL 319 - OK if taken since Spring 2011
INST 383 Age of The French Revolution
3.00 credits
The political, social, intellectual, and religious history of Europe from the eighteenth century to 1815, including the Enlightenment, the fall of the ancient regime, the French Revolution, and Napoleon. International Differences elective.
Prerequisite:
(HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D)
Equivalent:
FREN 347 - OK if taken since Fall 2011
HIST 321 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 384 Fnd of East Asian Civilization
3.00 credits
This course seeks to give students an understanding of the history and culture of pre-modern China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. After exploring the historical roots of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism in China, students will examine the ways in which these foundational philosophies helped form social, cultural, and political institutions in China and its neighbors. Students will also focus attention on the historical emergence of the Chinese imperial system, and its greatest pre-modern exemplars, the Qin, Han and T'ang dynasties. Not limiting the focus to China alone, students will also explore how the concept of China as the "middle kingdom" influenced the language, religion and political developments in Japan and Korea, leading to an authentic "macro-culture" in East Asia. The course will finish with a discussion of samurai culture and an analysis of how the Mongol conquests of Central and East Asia transformed the region, taking students to the threshold of the early modern period in Asia. It is desired but not required that students take HIST 112 prior to HIST 370. International Differences elective.
Prerequisite:
HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
HIST 370 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 385 Latin American Politics
3.00 credits
Impressive contributions and drawbacks of the caudillo or leader in Latin American history, culture, and society, in the range of contemporary forms of government-democratic, dictatorial, revolutionary. Some treatment of U.S. foreign policy.
Equivalent:
POLS 352 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 386 Europe in the 19th Century
3.00 credits
This course will examine the social and political history of Europe from the end of the Napoleonic era (1815) to the beginning of the First World War (1914). Special attention will be paid to those attitudes and structures which continue to play an important role in contemporary society such as industrialization, social revolutions, communism, socialism, women's movements, consumerism, racism, eugenics, nationalism, Church-State conflicts and the development of the middle class as an operative agent in government. This course will also examine how the arts both reflected these changes and acted as instruments of change within society. International Differences elective.
Prerequisite:
HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
HIST 323 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 387 Europe, 1918-1939
3.00 credits
Europe from 1918 to 1939 including the Great War, the Paris Peace Conference and the Treaty of Versailles, the rise of fascism, the Great Depression, Hitler and Nazi Party, and the origins of World War II. International Interactions elective.
Prerequisite:
(HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D)
Equivalent:
HIST 326 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 388 19th Century Germany
3.00 credits
This course examines the history of the German states from the end of the Napoleonic era to the end of the first world war. Issues to be explored include German nationalism and liberalism, the revolutions of 1848-1849, the rise of Prussia and the formation of the German Empire, and the development of political and social institutions during the imperial period. International Interactions elective.
Prerequisite:
HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
HIST 328 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 389 Politics of the Pacific Rim
3.00 credits
Focus on the role played by the East Asian capitalist development states (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore) in the accelerated economic growth of the Pacific Rim; a consideration of the Philippines as a representative of ASEAN; finally, a brief look at the likely impact of this Pacific Basin dynamism on the USA, Russia, and the P.R.C. International Interactions elective.
Equivalent:
POLS 364 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 390 African Politics and Develpmnt
3.00 credits
This is a course on the political economy of, largely, sub-Saharan Africa. Poverty is Africa’s overriding moral, economic, and political challenge. Topics treated include: State-society relations, civil society, institutions, incentives – political and economic, concepts and experiences of development, violence and ruling practices, trade and investment, urban and rural issues, formal and informal economies, social movements and political parties, inequality and justice, accountability of power, capacity building and corruption.
Equivalent:
POLS 365 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 391 Fascist Italy
3.00 credits
Italian history from 1918 to 1945, including an examination of social and economic conditions in post-world war Italy, rise of the Fascist Party, the role of Benito Mussolini, the nature of fascist government in Italy, Italian imperialism under Mussolini, and the part played by Italy as an ally with Hitler's Germany. International Differences elective.
Prerequisite:
HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
HIST 338 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 392 Tyranny to Democracy 21st Cen
3.00 credits
Between 1974 and 2000 more than fifty countries in Southern Europe, Latin America, East Asia, and Eastern Europe shifted from authoritarian to democratic systems of government. An examination of the causes and nature of these democratic transitions. Several case studies of democratic transitions in different areas of the world will be investigated in order to understand the factors responsible for the democratic trend and to ascertain which key variables best explain completed democratic transitions and democratic consolidation. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
POLS 368 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
SOSJ 346 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
INST 393 New Europe
3.00 credits
Studies the "new Europe" that has emerged since 1989 as integration through the European Union deepens and widens. Explores contemporary issues that European integration and globalization have fostered in the new Europe such as the resurgence of nationalism and extreme right-wing parties, the increased salience of local and regional identities, the need to build a supra-national European identity, increasing cultural diversity and the need to better manage immigration and migration, and Europe's place in the global economy and foreign affairs as it challenges American hegemony and seeks to continue to be a major player in world affairs. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
POLS 367 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 394 Modern Latin America
3.00 credits
A general introduction to the history of the former colonies of Spain and Portugal in the western hemisphere. Topics include the rise of caudillos, rural developments, the emergence of liberal economic development, populism, banana republics, dictatorships, dirty wars, Marxist revolution, and contemporary predicaments.
Equivalent:
HIST 381 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 395 Comparative European Politics
3.00 credits
Survey of the parties, institutions, political processes, issues and policies of the major western European industrialized nations. Special focus on England, France, and Germany, but coverage extends to the other European democracies as well. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
POLS 354 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 396 Chinese Philosophy
3.00 credits
A survey of the history of Chinese philosophy focusing on the Confucian tradition and taking other traditions such as Taoism and Buddhism into account. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
PHIL 434 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
INST 397 Hitler's Germany
3.00 credits
German history from 1918 to 1945. The causes, characteristics, and consequences of Nazi rule. International Differences elective.
Prerequisite:
HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
HIST 329 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 398 Modern Britain
3.00 credits
British history from 1688 to the present, emphasizing the reign of Victoria, industrialization and reform imperialism, constitutional and colonial development, the conflict with Napoleon, the Irish Home Rule, the decline of liberalism and the rise of labor, the two world wars, and the postwar welfare state. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
HIST 332 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
INST 399 Region Studies Abroad
1.00- 4.00 credits
Region study courses in politics, history, and economics taken abroad.
INST 401 Perspectives on Global Issues
3.00 credits
Critical analysis of vital global issues from the different perspectives of realists, idealists, and system-transformers. Exploration of competing worldviews and value systems, weighing of evidence from differing ideological, cultural, and gender perspectives. Introduces major analytical perspectives and organizing concepts fashioned by scholars to make these issues comprehensible.
Prerequisite:
INST 201 Minimum Grade: D or INST 301 Minimum Grade: D or POLS 350 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
POLS 366 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
INST 406 Narrative Fiction in Span Amer
3.00 credits
The novel and short story in Spanish America during the twentieth century. International Differences elective.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: D
INST 414 Latin American Cinema
3.00 credits
This course will focus on a series of representative Latin American films in order to explore issues of national formation and cultural identity. Emphasis will be given to the social, political, and economic factors which affect the production and reception of these films. International Differences elective.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
SPAN 416 - OK if taken since Spring 2010
INST 415 Spanish Cinema
3.00 credits
This course will provide an introduction to Spanish cinema through the study of film theory and representative films from different periods. Particular attention will be given to the historical, social, and cultural framework in the production and reception of those movies, as well as theories of authorship, gender, and national/cultural identity. International Differences elective.
Prerequisite:
SPAN 302 Minimum Grade: D
INST 416 The Italian Cinema
3.00 credits
This course aims at presenting aspects of Italian society through film. In English. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian. International Differences elective.
Equivalent:
ITAL 315 - OK if taken since Spring 2007
INST 430 Intersectional Communication
3.00 credits
The study of communication and culture in a global world cannot and must not be apolitical, ahistorical, or blind to the messy entanglements of power and privilege. Therefore, this course will focus on the intersections between critical race theory, feminist theory, and critical intercultural communication in order to interrogate and examine the ways in which our social identities and locations affect the contexts of our lives including our opportunities, relationships, and overall understanding of the world. Specifically, this course will engage the work of Black Feminist scholars and ongoing scholarly conversations on intersectionality to analyze intercultural encounters and engagement. Fall.
Prerequisite:
COMM 320 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 340 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 370 Minimum Grade: C
Equivalent:
SOSJ 466 - OK if taken since Fall 2018
INST 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
INST 440 Rhetoric of Social Change
3.00 credits
Public expression and discourse can affirm, complicate, challenge, and even radically revolutionize our shared values and ideals over time. Arguments and symbolic actions in communal spaces prompt individuals and groups to rethink, redevelop, and reestablish potential modes of identity, participation, and interaction within a society. Students in this course will closely examine specific social movements (including, potentially, civil rights, gender rights, indigenous rights, and environmental movements) to better understand the plurality of voices and modes of public expression in dialogue and competition that contribute to, resist, and ultimately shape societal change. Students will then build upon historical knowledge and perspective to engage in an immersive study of an ongoing contemporary social controversy, ultimately creating an informed rhetorical intervention of their own, participating in the social issues and changes of the current day. Fall.
Prerequisite:
COMM 320 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 340 Minimum Grade: C or COMM 350 Minimum Grade: C
INST 480 Topic in International Studies
1.00- 4.00 credits
Selected International Studies topics of current and special interest.
INST 490 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Credit by arrangement for directed reading and reports on selected topics.
INST 492 Independent Research or Study
.00- 6.00 credits
INST 497 Internship in Intr'l Studies
.00- 6.00 credits
Internship with organization with an international dimension, e.g., political or economic policy organizations, think tank or advocacy organizations; public or foreign policy organizations; human services, non-profit, or charitable organizations).
INST 498 Thesis
3.00 credits
Students may elect to substitute writing a thesis for one of their upper division electives. Thesis subject must be approved by INST Department Chair and mentor chosen by student with expertise in the subject region. Student must complete an individualized study form to register. See International Studies Department Chair to arrange.
INST 499 Senior Capstone
1.00 credit
Students take INST 499 in either semester of the senior year; the course involves compiling an electronic portfolio showcasing the student's academic work, service, study abroad experiences, internships and completing a problem-based research project with peers.
 
Second Language Competency

Competency in a second language (classical or modern) at the intermediate level (courses numbered 201) is required for students continuing in the study of a language. Students beginning study in a language they have not previously studied can fulfill the requirement by completing one year at the beginning level (courses numbered 101-102). Non-native speakers of English who have completed the required English core credits at Gonzaga may petition the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences for a waiver of this requirement.

Additional information on this requirement can be found at

Language Requirement Information

 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.