Course Catalog

Mathematics

Chairperson: Logan Axon
Professors: V. CoufalT. McKenzie, S. Overbay, J. Burke (Emeritus), W. Carsrud (Emeritus), J. Firkins (Emeritus)
Associate Professors: 
M. AlsakerL. Axon, R. CangelosiB. DichoneM. GhristM. K. KearneyR. Ray, K. ShultisJ. Stover, G. Nord (Emeritus), J. Vander Beek (Emeritus)
Assistant Professors:
 E. Hogle,  D. Larson, A. MamunH. Whitlatch
Senior Lecturers: C. GoodwinO. Kozubenko
Lecturers:
T. Guardia, S. Powers

The department offers two degrees, three majors, and three minors:

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics
(optional concentration in Statistics) 
Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics 
(optional concentration in Statistics) 
Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics
(optional concentrations in: Actuarial Science, Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, Environmental Science, Physics, Statistics)
(optional double concentrations in: Biology and Statistics, Biochemistry and Statistics, Chemistry and Statistics, Economics and Statistics, Environmental Science and Statistics, Physics and Statistics)
Minor in Applied Mathematics
Minor in Mathematics
Minor in Statistics

The Department of Mathematics provides training in mathematics and statistics and their applications to solve problems in business, engineering, the social sciences, and other disciplines. The curriculum offers a blend of pure mathematics, statistics and their applications. The department offers opportunities for students to grow their passion for mathematics and statistics and enrich their understanding of their role in the world through participation in conferences, community teaching, undergraduate research, and clubs. Majors are well prepared for positions in industry, government, and education, as well as for graduate studies.

All majors must take a senior comprehensive course (MATH 496 or MATH 499) in the fall semester of their final year. It is recommended that all Mathematics majors take PHYS 103CHEM 101, or BIOL 105 to satisfy their University Core Scientific Inquiry requirement. Prospective teachers of mathematics should consult the School of Education for the current state certification requirements.

The department involves students with activities sponsored by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). Majors may also participate in the annual William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition held every December.

Students pursuing a major in Mathematics or Applied Mathematics (except those with a concentration in Actuarial Science or Computer Science) may also pursue a concentration in Statistics. Students pursuing a major in Mathematics or Applied Mathematics cannot pursue a minor in Mathematics, Applied Mathematics or Statistics. Students are able to major or minor in Mathematics or Applied Mathematics, but not both. 


B.S. Major in Mathematics: 40 Credits

Lower Division

MATH 157 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 credits
MATH 259 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 credits

Upper Division

MATH 301 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 credits
MATH 339 Linear Algebra 3 credits
MATH 413 Real Analysis I
3 credits
MATH 437 Abstract Algebra I
3 credits
Choose one of the following five courses: 3 credits
MATH 414 Real Analysis II 
 
MATH 417 Complex Analysis 
 
MATH 438 Abstract Algebra II 
 
MATH 457 Number Theory & Cryptography  
 
MATH 459 Topology 
 
MATH 300-400 level electives*
6 credits
MATH 400-level electives  6 credits 
MATH 499 Comprehensive - Math 1 credit

 

One of these courses may be replaced by MATH 260.

 
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.
 

B.S. Major in Mathematics with a concentration in Statistics: 49 Credits

Students complete the B.S. Major in Mathematics as listed above, with the following two differences for Math Electives:
         3 credits instead of 6 for MATH 300-400 level electives,
         3 credits instead of 6 for MATH 400-level electives
Plus additional statistics courses.

Choose of the following two courses: 3 credits
MATH 321 Statistics for Experimentalists

 

MATH 422 Mathematical Statistics 

MATH 421 Probability Theory  3 credits

Choose one of the following two courses:

3 credits
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
MATH 300-400 level elective*

3 credits

MATH 400-level elective   

Statistics electives 

6 credits
Select two courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
One course must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 
 

 
*One of these courses may be replaced by MATH 260   
   
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 

B.A. Major in Mathematics: 31 Credits

Lower Division

MATH 157 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 credits
MATH 259 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 credits

Upper Division

MATH 301 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 credits
MATH 339 Linear Algebra 3 credits
One of the following two courses:
3 credits
MATH 413 Real Analysis I
 
MATH 437 Abstract Algebra I
 
MATH 300-400-level elective*  6 credits
MATH 400-level elective
3 credits
MATH 499 Comprehensive - Math 1 credit
 One of these courses may be replaced by MATH 260.  
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.
 

 

B.A. Major in Mathematics with a concentration in Statistics: 40 Credits

Students complete the B.A. Major in Mathematics as listed above, plus additional credits of statistics courses. Math electives are changed as follows:

  • 3 credits instead of 6 for MATH 300-400 level electives
  • MATH 421 instead of a MATH 400-level elective
  • Plus additional statistics courses.

MATH 300-400 level elective

3 credits

MATH 421 Probability Theory 3 credits

Choose one of the following two courses:

3 credits
          MATH 321  Statistics for Experimentalists
          MATH 422  Mathematical Statistics 
Choose one of the following two courses
3 credits    
          MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
          MATH 426 Experimental Design  
Statistics electives 6 credits 
Select two courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
One course must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 

*One of these courses may be replaced by MATH 260
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497. 
 

 

B.S. Major in Applied Mathematics: 57-77 Credits

Lower Division

MATH 157 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 credits
MATH 259 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 credits
MATH 260  Ordinary Differential Equations* 3 credits
CPSC 121 Computer Science I 3 credits 

Upper Division

 
MATH 301 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses: 
 
             MATH 335 Applied Linear Algebra   
             MATH 339 Linear Algebra   
MATH 350 Numerical Methods(2)   
MATH 413 Real Analysis I(3) 
3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:
3 credits 
MATH 321 Statistics for Experimentalists(4) 
 
MATH 422 Mathematical Statistics (5) 
 
MATH 496 Comprehensive - Applied Math 1 credit
Select an Applied Math concentration option 23-43 credits

 

Select one of the following Applied Math concentration options: 

 

(Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the following options, students should make note of pre-requisites and minimum grade requirements that may not be listed as degree requirements.)

 
No concentration 23-25 credits
Actuarial Science concentration   35 credits
Biology concentration 34 credits
Biochemistry concentration

33 credits


Chemistry concentration 33 credits
Computer Science concentration 33 credits
Economics concentration 30-31 credits 
Environmental Science concentration 34 credits  
Physics concentration  31 credits 
Statistics concentration 31-32 credits  
Biology and Statistics double concentration 43 credits  
Biochemistry and Statistics double concentration 42 credits   
Chemistry and Statistics double concentration 42 credits  
Economics and Statistics double concentration 39-40 credits  
Environmental Science and Statistics double concentration 43 credits   
Physics and Statistics double concentration 40 credits   
     
NOTE Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.
   
Computer Science concentration only: MATH 260  optional, may be counted as a MATH 300-400 level elective.
   
 (2)Actuarial Science Concentration students take MATH 423 Stochastic Processes instead of MATH 350.
   
(3)Computer Science concentration students may choose MATH 437 Abstract Algebra I, or MATH 457 Number Theory and Cryptography instead of MATH 413.
   
 (4)Actuarial Science concentration students must take MATH 422 (not MATH 321).     
 (5)All non-double concentrations except Actuarial Science: If MATH 422 is chosen, then one MATH 400-level elective may be replaced by a MATH 300-level elective.
   

 

No concentration: 23-25 credits (34 + 23-25 credits)

57-59 credits
Choose two of the following three courses/lab combinations:
8 credits
BIOL 105/BIOL 105L Info Flow in Biological Systems and Lab

CHEM 101/CHEM 101L General Chemistry and Lab

PHYS 103 Scientific Physics I

Choose one of the following four courses: 3-5 credits
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biological Systems (3 credits)
 
CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)
 
CHEM 230/CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I and Lab (5 credits)
 
PHYS 204 Scientific Physics II (4 credits) 
 
Choose one of the following three courses: 3 credits
MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math 
 
MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations
 
MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos
 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 400- level electives  6 credits
   
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497. 
 
   

Applied Math Single Concentrations:

 

 

Actuarial Science Concentration: 34 credits + 35 credits

 69 credits
ACCT 263 Accounting Analysis  3 credits
ECON 201 Microeconomics 3 credits 
ECON 202 Macroeconomics 3 credits
ECON 301 Intermediate Microeconomics
3 credits
ECON 352 Money and Banking
3 credits
ECON 352L Money and Banking Lab
1 credit
ECON 355 Regression Analysis
3 credits
ECON 451 Econometrics
3 credits
MATH 421 Probability Theory
3 credits
MATH 494 Topics in Actuarial Science
1 credit
MATH 300-400 electives 6 credits
One of the following two options:
3 credits
MATH 400- level elective
 
ECON 452 Time Series Analysis
 

 

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 
   
 

Biology concentration: 34 credits + 34 credits

 
CHEM 101/CHEM 101L General Chemistry and Lab 4 credits
BIOL 105/BIOL 105L Info Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 4 credits
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biological Systems 3 credits
Choose two of the following three courses:
8 credits
BIOL 205/BIOL 205L Physiology and Biodiversity and Lab
 
BIOL 206/BIOL 206L Ecology and Lab
 
BIOL 207/BIOL 207L Genetics and Lab
 
BIOL 300-400 level electives(1)  6 credits
Choose one of the following three courses: 3 credits
MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math
 
MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations
 
MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos
 
MATH 400- level electives 6 credits
   
(1)Biology elective options: BIOL 303, 313, 323, 331, 333, 335, 338, 340, 341, 343, 344, 357, 360, 367, 371, 399, 403, 420, 441 (other courses may be considered on a case-by-case basis). BIOL 334, 337, and 451 are allowed but require BIOL 205, 206, and 207 as pre-requisites. 
 

 

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 
 

Biochemistry concentration: (34 credits + 33 credits) 

 67 credits
CHEM 101/CHEM 101L General Chemistry and Lab 4 credits
CHEM 230/CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I and Lab 5 credits
CHEM 231/CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry II and Lab 4 credits
CHEM 245/CHEM 245L Biochemistry and Lab 4 credits
CHEM 399 Advanced Topics 
2 credits
CHEM 407Special Topics in Biochemistry
2 credits
Choose one of the following three courses: 3 credits
MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math
 
MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations
 
MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos
 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 400- level electives 6 credits
   
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497. 
 
 

Chemistry concentration: (34 credits + 33 credits)

 67 credits
PHYS 103 Scientific Physics I 4 credits
CHEM 101/CHEM 101L General Chemistry and Lab 4 credits
CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry 3 credits
CHEM 230/CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I and Lab 5 credits 
CHEM 310/CHEM 310L Analytical Chemistry and Lab
5 credits 
CHEM 355 Physical Chemistry
3 credits
Choose one of the following three courses: 3 credits
MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math 
 
MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations
 
MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos
 
MATH 400- level electives
6 credits
   
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497. 
 
 

Computer Science concentration: (34 credits + 33 credits)

67 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:  3 credits
CPSC 122 Computer Science II 
 
CPSC 222 Intro to Data Science
 
CPSC 223 Algorithms and Abstract Data Structures  3 credits
Choose one of the following four courses:
3 credits
CPSC 322 Data Science Algorithms 
 
CPSC 351 Theory of Computation
 
CPSC 353 Applied Cryptography
 
CPSC 450 Design & Analysis of Computer Algorithms 
 
CPSC 200-300-400 level electives(1) 3 credits 
CPSC 300-400 level electives 3 credits 
MATH 351 Combinatorics & Graph Theory 3 credits
Choose three of the following six courses:
9 credits
MATH 328 Operations Research
 
MATH 421 Probability Theory
 
MATH 423 Stochastic Processes
 
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
MATH 455 Chaos and Discrete Dynamical Systems
 
MATH 300-400 elective 3 credits
MATH 400-level electives 6 credits
(1)CPSC elective options: CPSC 224, 321, 322*, 323*, 324*, 325, 326, 331-334, 351*, 353*, 447, 475. Other options are CPSC 223, 425, 450* (check for pre-requisites).
 *recommended elective choices
 

 

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 
 

Economics concentration: (34 credits + 30-31 credits)

64-65 credits
ECON 201 Microeconomics 3 credits
ECON 202 Macroeconomics  3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:
3 credits
ECON 301 Intermediate Microeconomics(1)
 
ECON 351 Managerial Economics
 
ECON 303 Game Theory and Economic Applications 3 credits
ECON 300-400 level elective(2)  3-4 credits
MATH 421 Probability Theory 3 credits
Choose two of the following five courses:
6 credits
MATH 423 Stochastic Processes 
 
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models 
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math
 
MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations
 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 400-level elective

3 credits

   
(1)ECON 301 pre-requisite ECON 201 requires a minimum grade of B-.
 
  (2)ECON Elective options: ECON 320, 321*, 322, 324, 325, 330, 333, 334, 352/352L*, 355, 451*, 452*.  *recommended elective choices  

 

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 

Environmental Science concentration: (34 credits + 34 credits)

 68 credits
ENVS 101 Introduction to Environmental Studies  3 credits
ENVS 103/ ENVS 103L Environmental Biology(1) 4 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:
4 credits
          CHEM 101/ CHEM 101L General Chemistry  
          BIOL 105/ BIOL105L Info Flow in Biological Systems  
Choose one of the following two courses:
4 credits
         ENVS 110/ ENVS 110L Introduction to Earth Systems  
         ENVS 202/ ENVS 202L Chemistry and the Environment(2)  
ENVS 320 Economics of Environmental Protection(3) 3 credits
ENVS 384/ ENVS 384L GIS and Ecological Techniques(4) 4 credits 
Choose two of the following five courses:
6 credits
         MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models  
         MATH 426 Experimental Design  
         MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math  
         MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations  
         MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos  
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 400- level elective 3 credits
   

(1)Alternative: BIOL 206/206L (cross-listed, pre-requisite BIOL 105/106).
(2)Pre-requisite CHEM 101/101L.
(3)Alternative: ECON 324 (pre-requisite ECON 200 or 201).
(4)Alternative: BIOL 344/344L (cross-listed, pre-requisite BIOL 106/206).

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 

Physics concentration: (34 credits + 31 credits) 

 65 credits
PHYS 103/PHYS 103L Scientific Physics I and Lab  5 credits
PHYS 204/PHYS 204L Scientific Physics II and Lab  5 credits
PHYS 200, 300, 400 level electives(1) 6 credits
Choose two of the following four courses:
6 credits
MATH 417 Complex Variables
 
MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math
 
MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations
 
MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos 
 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 400- level electives 6 credits
   
 (1) PHYS elective options: PHYS 205, 301, 306, 307, 402, 407, 409, 415, 450, 464 (PHYS 409 and 464 require PHYS 205 as a pre-requisite).   

 

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 

Statistics concentration: (34 credits + 31-32 credits) 

 65-66 credits
Choose one of the following three sets of courses:
7-8 credits 
Biology Set:  
BIOL 105/BIOL 105L Info Flow in Biological Systems and Lab
 
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biological Systems
 
Physics Set:  
PHYS 103 Scientific Physics I

 

 
PHYS 204 Scientific Physics II
 
Chemistry Set:  
CHEM 101/CHEM 101L General Chemistry and Lab
 
CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry
 
Choose one of the following three courses:
3 credits
MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math
 
MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations 
 
MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos 
 
MATH 421 Probability Theory 3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses
3 credits
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 400- level electives 6 credits
Statistics Electives 6 credits
Select two courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
One course must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 

 
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497. 
 
   

Applied Math Dual concentrations:

 

Biology and Statistics double concentration: (34 credits + 43 credits) 

 77 credits

Students complete the B.S. Major in Applied Mathematics
with a concentration in Biology as listed above with the
following  two differences for Applied Math electives: 

  • 3 credits instead of 6 credits for MATH 300-400 electives
  • 3 credits instead of 6 credits for MATH electives
  • Plus students take additional statistic courses. 


      

 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 421 Probability Theory 3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:
6 credits
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design 
 
Math Electives 3 credits
Cannot double-count with a required course. MATH 335, 339, 365, 390, 432, 490, 497 and 499 cannot be used as Math electives.
 
Statistics Electives  6 credits
Select two courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
One course must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 
 
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497. 
 

Biochemistry and Statistics double concentration: (34 credits + 42 credits) 

 76 credits

Students complete the B.S. Major in Applied Mathematics with a Biology concentration as listed above, with additional statistics courses. 

  • Math electives differ with 3 credits instead of 6 credits for Math 400-level electives.
 
MATH 300-400 level electives  3 credits
MATH 400- level elective   3 credits
MATH 421 Probability Theory  3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:
3 credits
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
Statistics electives  6 credits
Select two courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
One course must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 
 
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497. 
 

Chemistry and Statistics double concentration: (34 credits + 42 credits) 

 76 credits

Students complete the B.S. Major in Applied Mathematics with a Chemistry concentration as listed above, with additional statistics courses. 

  • Math electives differ with 3 credits of MATH 300-400 level credits
  • MATH 421, instead of 6 credits of Math 400-level electives. 
 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 421 Probability Theory  3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:
3 credits
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
Statistics electives  6 credits
Select two courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
One course must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 
 

 

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 

Economics and Statistics double concentration: (34 credits + 39-40 credits) 

 73-74 credits

Students complete the B.S. Major in Applied Mathematics with an Economics concentration as listed above, with additional statistics courses. 

  • The requirement to Choose two of the following five courses (MATH 423, 425, 426, 440, 454) is modified as Choose one of three and Choose one of two courses as shown:
 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 400- level elective 3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:
3 credits
           MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math  
           MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations  
Choose one of the following two courses:
3 credits
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
Statistics electives  9 credits
Select three courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
Two course must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 
 
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.
 

Environmental Science and Statistics double concentration: (34 credits + 43 credits) 

 77 credits
Students complete the B.S. Major in Applied Mathematics with a concentration in Environmental Science, plus additional statistics courses. 
  • MATH electives differ with MATH 421 taken instead of the MATH 400-level elective. 
  • The requirement to Choose two of the following five courses (MATH 423, 425, 426, 440, 454) is modified as Choose one of three and Choose one of two courses as shown:
 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 421 Probability Theory 3 credits
Choose one of the following three courses:
3 credits
           MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math  
           MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations  
           MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos  
Choose one of the following two courses:
3 credits
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
Statistics electives  6 credits
Select three courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
Two courses must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 
 
Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.
 

Physics and Statistics double concentration: (34 credits + 40 credits) 

 74 credits

Students complete the B.S. Major in Applied Mathematics with a Physics concentration as listed above, with additional statistics courses.

  • MATH electives differ with 3 credits instead of 6 credits of MATH 400-level electives.
 
MATH 300-400 level elective 3 credits
MATH 400- level elective 3 credits
MATH 421 Probability Theory 3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:
3 credits
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
Statistics electives  6 credits
Select two courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
One course must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 

 

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 

 
Statistics Electives List  
MATH 422 Mathematical Statistics
 
MATH 423 Stochastic Processes
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
ECON 355 Regression Analysis
 
ECON 451 Econometrics
 
ECON 452 Time Series Analysis
 
CPSC 322 Data Science Algorithms
 
CPSC 324 Big Data Analytics
 
PHYS 450 Statistical Physics 
 
*Or any course with significant probability or statistics content with approval of the Math Department Chair. All of these courses have pre-requisites and may require courses outside of the concentration to be taken.   
 

Minor in Applied Mathematics: 24 Credits

 

Lower Division

 
MATH 157 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
4 credits
MATH 259 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
4 credits 
MATH 260 Ordinary Differential Equations
3 credits 

Upper Division

 
Choose one of the following two courses: 3 credits
MATH 335 Applied Linear Algebra
 
MATH 339 Linear Algebra
 
Choose one of the following three courses:  3 credits 
MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math
 
MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations
 
MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos 
 
Applied Math electives:
3 credits

 

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 

Minor in Mathematics: 24 credits

 

Lower Division

MATH 157 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 credits
MATH 259 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 credits

Upper Division

MATH 301 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 credits
Choose one of the following two courses:
 
MATH 335 Applied Linear Algebra
 
MATH 339 Linear Algebra
 
MATH 300-400 level elective* 3 credits
MATH 400- level elective 3 credits

This course may be replaced by MATH 260.

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497. 

 

Minor in Statistics: 23 credits

 

Lower Division

MATH 157 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 credits
MATH 258 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 credits

Upper Division

Choose of the following two courses:
3 credits
MATH 335 Applied Linear Algebra
 
MATH 339 Linear Algebra
 
Choose one of the following two courses:  3 credits
MATH 321 Statistics for Experimentalists
 
MATH 422 Mathematical Statistics 
 
Choose one of the following two courses: 
3 credits
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
 
MATH 426 Experimental Design
 
Statistics electives: 6 credits
Select two courses from the Statistics Electives list.
 
One course must be MATH. Cannot double-count with courses used elsewhere. 

Math Electives: cannot double-count with a required course.
Cannot use MATH 335, MATH 432 or MATH 496 as MATH electives.
Maximum of three (3) total credits from the following may be counted
toward Math electives: MATH 365 (may be taken for credit only once),
MATH 390, MATH 490, MATH 497.

 

Lower Division
MATH 099 Intermediate Algebra
3.00 credits
Review of basic algebraic operations and concepts for students who need additional preparation before taking other courses involving mathematics. Topics include operations on algebraic expressions, factoring, algebraic functions, linear and quadratic equations, graphing, exponents, radicals, and linear equations in two unknowns. This course does not fulfill the math requirement in the University Core.
MATH 100 College Algebra
3.00 credits
College algebra for those students who need additional preparation before taking MATH 114, MATH 147, or MATH 148. Topics include equations, polynomials, conics, graphing, algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions. This course does not fulfill the math requirement in the University Core. Fall and Spring.
Equivalent:
MATH 112 - Taken before Summer 2016
MATH 103 Excursions in Mathematics
3.00 credits
An elementary survey of various mathematical areas such as algebra, geometry, counting (permutations, combinations), probability, and other topics selected by the instructor. This course is intended for the liberal arts student not pursuing business or the sciences. Fall and Spring.
MATH 104 Elements of Algebra & Stats
3.00 credits
Development and application of concepts from algebra and statistics. Topics include polynomials, solving equations, graphing, functions, modeling, counting (permutations and combinations), data representation, probability, and statistics.
MATH 114 Mathematical Analysis-Business
3.00 credits
Designed for the student majoring in business. Topics selected from: functions and models, systems of equations, optimization, and introductory calculus. The emphasis will be on examples from business, which may include: cost, revenue, profit, supply, demand, market equilibrium, interest, present-value, future-value, and consumer and producer surplus. Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: MATH 100
MATH 121 Introductory Statistics
3.00 credits
An introduction to the basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics and their application to the interpretation and analysis of data. Fall and Spring.
MATH 147 Precalculus
3.00 credits
Topics include advanced equations and inequalities, functions and graphs including composite and inverse functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions and their graphs, right angle trigonometry, trigonometric identities, systems of equations, and conics. Fall and Spring.
MATH 148 Survey of Calculus
3.00 credits
A one semester introduction to differential and integral calculus designed to convey the significance, use and application of calculus for liberal arts students, particularly those in the behavioral, biological, and social sciences. Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: MATH 100
MATH 157 Calculus-Analytic Geometry I
4.00 credits
An introduction to calculus for engineering, science and mathematics students, with an emphasis on conceptual understanding, problem solving, and modeling. Topics covered include: limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, applications of the derivative including optimization problems and linear approximations, antiderivatives, introduction to the definite integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: MATH 147, minimum grade: C
MATH 180 Special Topics
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
Concurrent:
MATH 157
MATH 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process. This course does not meet major or minor requirements.
MATH 221 Applied Statistics
3.00 credits
This course contains an introduction to probability and the use of statistics to solve problems in a variety of scientific disciplines. Topics include experimental design, sampling methods, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, and linear models. The use of statistical software is integral to this course. Fall.
Prerequisite:
MATH 148 Minimum Grade: D or MATH 157 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 231 Discrete Structures
3.00 credits
A study of propositional logic, set theory, functions, algorithms, divisibility, introductory number theory, elementary proof techniques, counting techniques, recursive definitions, mathematical induction, and graph theory. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
MATH 148 Minimum Grade: D or MATH 157 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 258 Calculus-Analytic Geometry II
4.00 credits
A continuation of MATH 157. Topics covered are: techniques of integration, applications of the integral, improper integrals, sequences and infinite series with an introduction to convergence tests, parametric equations, and polar coordinates.
Prerequisite:
MATH 157 Minimum Grade: C-
MATH 259 Calculus-Analytic Geometry III
4.00 credits
A treatment of multivariable calculus and the calculus of vector fields. Topics include: vectors and vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, curl and divergence, line integrals, Green’s theorem, Stokes’ theorem, and the Divergence theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 258 Minimum Grade: C-
MATH 260 Ordinary Differential Equation
3.00 credits
Solution methods for first-order equations, second-order linear equations, and linear systems of differential equations, including analytic and qualitative approaches. Topics include mathematical modeling, Laplace transforms, Taylor series solutions, and an introduction to matrix methods. Additional topics may include numerical methods, analyzing nonlinear systems, and techniques for higher-order linear equations. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
MATH 259 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 290 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Readings and reports in selected mathematical topics. Upon sufficient demand.
Prerequisite:
MATH 157 Minimum Grade: D
Upper Division
MATH 301 Fundamentals of Mathematics
3.00 credits
A development of the standard techniques of mathematical proof through an examination of logic, set theory, as well as one-to-one, onto, and inverse functions. Additional topics may be chosen from the topology of the real line, the cardinality of sets, basic number theory, and basic group theory. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
MATH 259 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 321 Statistics for Experimentalist
3.00 credits
An applied statistics course for those with calculus preparation. Descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous random variables, and methods of inferential statistics including interval estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression. Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: MATH 258 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 328 Operations Research
3.00 credits
Quantitative methods for application to problems from business, engineering, and the social sciences. Topics include linear and dynamic programming, transportation problems, network analysis, PERT, and game theory. Spring, odd years. Prerequisite: MATH 258 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 335 Applied Linear Algbra
3.00 credits
An applied study of matrices, vector spaces, and linear transformations, with a focus on computations and modeling. Topics include linear systems, dependence and rank, bases, inner product spaces, orthogonal and orthonormal sets, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, matrix factorizations, and singular values. Additional topics may include numerical techniques and applications to static and dynamical physical systems, Markov chains, graph theory, artificial neural networks, image and signal processing. Computer programming will be an integral component of the class. Spring. Prerequisite: MATH 157 Minimum Grade: C- or MATH 231 Minimum Grade: C-
Prerequisite:
MATH 157 Minimum Grade: C- or MATH 231 Minimum Grade: C-
MATH 339 Linear Algebra
3.00 credits
A systematic study of the theory of matrices, vector spaces, and linear transformations. Topics include systems of linear equations, determinants, linear independence, bases, dimension, rank, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Additional topics may include inner products, orthonormal bases, projections, and quadratic forms. Applications may include geometry, adjacency matrices, calculus, difference equations, least squares, and Markov chains. Some proof-writing expected. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
MATH 259 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 341 Modern Geometry
3.00 credits
Axiomatic systems for, and selected topics from, Euclidean geometry, projective geometry, and other non-Euclidean geometries. Special attention will be given to the needs of the individuals preparing to teach at the secondary level. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite:
MATH 259 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 350 Numerical Methods
3.00 credits
An introduction to approximating solutions to problems arising in applied mathematics and science. Topics include solving linear systems, root-finding, interpolations, regression, numerical integration and differentiation, and initial value problems. Computer programming will be an integral component of the class. Fall. Prerequisite: MATH 258 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 351 Combinatorics and Graph Theory
3.00 credits
An introduction to combinatorics and graph theory with topics taken from counting techniques, generating functions, combinatorial designs and codes, matchings, directed graphs, paths, circuits, connectivity, trees, planarity, and colorings. Fall, odd years. Prerequisite: MATH 231 Minimum Grade: D or Math 301 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 360 Selected Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Various areas of pure and applied mathematics presented at a level accessible to those just completing calculus. Upon sufficient demand.
MATH 361 Selected Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Various areas of pure and applied mathematics presented at a level accessible to those just completing calculus. Upon sufficient demand.
MATH 362 Selected Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Various areas of pure and applied mathematics presented at a level accessible to those just completing calculus. Upon sufficient demand.
MATH 363 Selected Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Various areas of pure and applied mathematics presented at a level accessible to those just completing calculus. Upon sufficient demand.
MATH 365 Math Seminar
1.00 credit
This seminar is intended to expose students with a calculus background to a wide variety of interesting topics and applications in mathematics. The goal of this seminar is to help students discover and explore topics in mathematics, not typically covered in a classroom setting. A weekly guest lecturer will present a topic or activity and invite questions and participation from the class. Guest lecturers may be faculty, students who have performed independent research, or guests from the community. Spring
Prerequisite:
MATH 258 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 390 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
MATH 413 Real Analysis I
3.00 credits
This proof-based course provides a rigorous treatment of the real number system, the topology of the real line, sequences and series of numbers and functions, continuity of functions, differentiation, and the Riemann integral. Spring and Fall, even years. Prerequisite: MATH 301 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 414 Real Analysis II
3.00 credits
Continuation of MATH 413 with topics chosen from Lebesgue theory, metric spaces, function spaces, and multivariable calculus. Spring, odd years.
Prerequisite:
MATH 413 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 417 Complex Variables
3.00 credits
An introduction to complex numbers and functions of one complex variable. Topics include the geometry and algebra of complex numbers, elementary functions, analytic functions, integration on the complex plane, Taylor and Laurent expansions, and the calculus of residues. Other topics selected from conformal mappings, integral transforms and inversion formulas, harmonic functions, and winding numbers, with applications to physical problems. Spring, even years. Prerequisite: MATH 301 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 421 Probability Theory
3.00 credits
A mathematical treatment of the laws of probability with emphasis on those properties fundamental to mathematical statistics. General probability spaces, combinatorial analysis, random variables, conditional probability, moment generating functions, Bayes' law, distribution theory, and law of large numbers. Fall. Prerequisite: MATH 301 Minimum Grade: D or (MATH 259 Minimum Grade: D & MATH 339 Minimum Grade: D) or (MATH 259 Minimum Grade: D & MATH 351 Minimum Grade: D) or (MATH 259 Minimum Grade: D & MATH 335 Minimum Grade: D)
MATH 422 Mathematical Statistics
3.00 credits
An examination of the mathematical principles underlying the basic statistical inference techniques of estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, nonparametric statistics, analysis of variance. Spring, even years.
Prerequisite:
MATH 421 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 423 Stochastic Processes
3.00 credits
An introduction to random processes and their applications in scientific inquiry, including discrete and continuous time probability models, Markov chains, Poisson processes, random walks, and simulation techniques. Additional topics selected from: queuing theory, branching processes, reliability theory, and Brownian motion. Spring, odd years.
Prerequisite:
MATH 421 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 425 Applied Statistical Models
3.00 credits
The course covers a wide range of statistical models including simple and multiple linear regression for quantitative and qualitative variables, logistic regression, log-linear models, models for rates (Poisson regression), and non-linear regression models. Inferences and model adequacy checking, model selection, and validation will be covered. The emphasis is on the practical application of these methods using statistical software. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite:
MATH 321 Minimum Grade: D or MATH 422 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 426 Experimental Design
3.00 credits
This course covers ANOVA models without and with interactions, randomized block, Latin square, factorial, confounded factorial, balanced incomplete block, other designs. Working with simple linear regression models, random and mixed-effects models, response surface methodology are covered. The emphasis is on how to plan, design, and conduct experiments efficiently and effectively, and analyze the resulting data using statistical software. Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite:
MATH 321 Minimum Grade: D or MATH 422 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world. This course does not meet major or minor requirements.
MATH 437 Abstract Algebra I
3.00 credits
A detailed examination of topics chosen from groups, rings, integral domains, Euclidean domains, unique factorization, fields, Galois theory, and solvability by radicals. Spring and Fall, odd years. Pre-requisite: MATH 301
MATH 438 Abstract Algebra II
3.00 credits
Continuation of MATH 437. Spring, even years.
Prerequisite:
MATH 437 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 440 Foundations of Applied Math
3.00 credits
This course introduces advanced foundational techniques used to solve problems arising in applied mathematics, science and engineering. Topics include dimensional analysis and scaling, mathematical modeling, perturbation methods, and asymptotic expansions. Additional topics may include the calculus of variations, similarity methods, integral transforms, Fourier series, special functions, and the derivation of models from conservation laws and constitutive equations; other topics may be selected at the discretion of the instructor. Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite:
MATH 260 Minimum Grade: C-
MATH 450 Selected Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Possible topics include combinatorics, topology, number theory, advanced numerical analysis, advanced linear algebra, theory of computation and complexity, and history of mathematics. Credit by arrangement. Upon sufficient demand.
MATH 451 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Possible topics include combinatorics, topology, number theory, advanced numerical analysis, advanced linear algebra, theory of computation and complexity, and history of mathematics. Credit by arrangement. Upon sufficient demand.
MATH 452 Selected Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Possible topics include combinatorics, topology, number theory, advanced numerical analysis, advanced linear algebra, theory of computation and complexity, and history of mathematics. Credit by arrangement. Upon sufficient demand.
MATH 453 Selected Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Possible topics include combinatorics, topology, number theory, advanced numerical analysis, advanced linear algebra, theory of computation and complexity, and history of mathematics. Credit by arrangement. Upon sufficient demand.
MATH 454 Partial Differential Equations
3.00 credits
Solutions of boundary value problems with applications to heat flow, wave motion, and potential theory. Topics include derivation of the heat, wave, and Laplace's equations, orthogonal sets of functions, Fourier series, Sturm-Liouville theory, separation of variables, integral transforms, the method of characteristics, and extensions to higher dimensions and non-Cartesian coordinate systems. Additional topics may include numerical methods, inverse methods, and nonlinear equations. Spring.
Prerequisite:
MATH 260 Minimum Grade: C-
MATH 455 Chaos & Discrete Dynamical Sys
3.00 credits
Introduction to the study of one-dimensional discrete-time nonlinear systems and their potential for chaotic behavior. The course will focus on investigations through computer experiments - numerical and graphical - and the mathematical analysis of the observed behavior. Students are expected to write code in at least one high-level language. Topics include orbit analysis, fixed and periodic points, graphical analysis, bifurcations, symbolic dynamics, chaos, and fractals. Additional topics selected from dynamics in the complex plane, higher dimensional maps, numerical computation of Lyapunov exponents, fractal dimension, Sarkovskii's theorem, and chaos control. Spring, even years. Prerequisites: (MATH 231 Minimum Grade: C and CPSC 122) or (CPSC 121 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 350)
Prerequisite:
(CPSC 121 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 350 Minimum Grade: D) or (MATH 231 Minimum Grade: C and CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D)
Equivalent:
CPSC 455 - OK if taken since Spring 2022
MATH 457 Number Theory & Cryptography
3.00 credits
Elementary number theory topics including modular arithmetic, Diophantine equations, multiplicative functions, factorization techniques, primality testing, and development of the public key code. Additional topics may be included. Fall, even years. Prerequisite: MATH 301 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 459 Topology
3.00 credits
Topics selected from the following: Metric spaces, manifolds, general topological spaces. Sequences, continuous functions, homeomorphisms. The separation axioms, connectedness, compactness. The theory of surfaces. Knot theory. Topics from combinatorial topology, algebraic topology, differential topology. Other topics to be determined by the instructor. Spring, odd years. Prerequisite: MATH 301 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
MATH 450 - OK if taken between Fall 2012 and Fall 2012
MATH 462 Nonlinear Systems and Chaos
3.00 credits
A study of nonlinear ordinary differential equations and systems of such equations, with a focus on approaching problems geometrically. Topics include phase space, equilibrium solutions, bifurcations, stability analysis, limit cycles, chaos, fractals, and strange attractors; other topics may be selected at the discretion of the instructor. Applications to problems in biology, chemistry, physics, engineering and other fields will be explored. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite:
MATH 260 Minimum Grade: C-
MATH 490 Directed Reading
.00- 4.00 credits
Selected topics in mathematics.
MATH 494 Topics in Actuarial Science
1.00 credit
This course explores the application of mathematics to solving actuarial science problems. Course material is intended to help students prepare for the probability and financial math actuarial exams. Spring.
Prerequisite:
MATH 421 Minimum Grade: C- and ECON 352L Minimum Grade: C-
MATH 496 Comprehensive - Applied Math
1.00 credit
A comprehensive survey of applied mathematics and its connections with various technical disciplines. Students will gain experience with both written and oral communication while reviewing a breadth of mathematical topics and exploring interdisciplinary applications. Students will be required to take the Educational Testing Service’s Major Field Test in Mathematics. Required of all Applied Mathematics majors in their final year. Fall.
MATH 497 Mathematics Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Special program for Mathematics majors.
MATH 498A Thesis I
1.00 credit
This course provides the motivated student with the opportunity to conduct an independent research project under the direction of a Mathematics Department faculty member. Rigorous research and study of advanced material with a significant technical writing component. Contingent on the student finding a faculty member in the Department of Mathematics who is willing to serve as a mentor. Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: MATH 301 Minimum Grade: D
MATH 498B Thesis II
2.00 credits
Continuation of MATH 498A, culminating in a written thesis. Students are expected to present their work at a conference. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
MATH 498A Minimum Grade: B
MATH 499 Comprehensive - Math
1.00 credit
A comprehensive survey of mathematics. Students will gain experience with both written and oral communication of mathematics while reviewing a breadth of mathematical topics. Students will be required to take the Educational Testing Service’s Major Field Test in Mathematics. Required of all Mathematics majors in their final year. Fall.
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.