English

Chairperson: Ann Ciasullo
Professors: D. Butterworth, A. Ciasullo, E. CooleyB. CooneyH. Easterling, J. Eliason, M. Herzog (Emeritus), T. Marshall, J. Maucione, J. Miller, M. Pringle, I. Ranum, P. Terry, L. Tredennick
Associate Professors: M. BoltonM. Ciesla, J. Thayer, A. Wadden (Emeritus)
Assistant Professors:  C. Bollig, J. Dodd, Y. Kang, K. RodenA. Roncero-Bellido
Senior Lecturers: G. GreyJ. Halliday, H. Herrick, M. Pajer

The department offers one major and two minors:

Bachelor of Arts, English major (with a required concentration in either Literature or Writing) 
Minor in English
Minor in Writing

The Department of English is a community of active scholars and writers dedicated to helping students form a deeper sense of themselves and the world. We celebrate the beauty of words and emphasize the power of language as a path towards that goal. Our program seeks to enhance students’ creative, analytical, and practical writing skills, and we do so by offering courses that emphasize cultural, historical and theoretical approaches to literature, film, multimodal texts, and the creative process. Through a broad range of courses, we affirm the importance of creating and carefully understanding all forms of discourse. As a department, we value well-crafted arguments, sophisticated analyses, elegant writing, and thoughtful engagement with research. We help students hone their critical thinking and writing skills in ways both creative and practical. Students apply these skills in courses and in writing for The Bulletin and other campus publications, tutoring in the Writing Center, and presenting their work at conferences. Graduates from the English Department have gone on to pursue careers in writing, teaching, law, editing, publishing, and the tech sector.

English Department courses fulfill the requirements of the core curricula of the University and constitute a Bachelor of Arts degree in English; they provide majors in other disciplines with further experience in and appreciation for literature and writing; they offer majors and minors in English engagement with the literary heritage of Western and non-Western traditions; and they develop students’ mastery of the conventions and nuances of written prose.

The University Core curriculum requires three semester hours of Writing (ENGL 101 or ENGL 200) and three semester hours of Literature. Many English 100- and 200-level literature courses will fulfill the University Core Literature requirement.

English majors earning a secondary teaching credential must take one 3-credit multicultural literature course and a writing pedagogy course, either ENGL 390 or ENGL 395.

Because we believe that effective writing is essential for professional, personal, and intellectual development, the English Department directs the operation of a Writing Center open to the Gonzaga community.

Founded on solid introductory writing and literature courses and covering a variety of genres, time periods, and theoretical approaches to texts, the English major offers two areas of emphasis: a Literature Concentration and a Writing Concentration. Students in both concentrations take the same foundational courses, worth a total of 12 credits: a University Core Writing course, lower-division courses on English form and English history, and an upper-division course on literature before 1660. All English majors must also take a course with a multicultural distribution. Once students decide which concentration they will pursue, they study the curriculum specific to each concentration.


B.A. Major in English: 39 Credits

Courses required for both concentrations
Lower Division
One of the following University Core Writing courses:
3 credits
ENGL 101 Writing

ENGL 200 Intermediate Composition

One of the following English Form courses:
3 credits
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literature

ENGL 103H Honors Literature I
 
ENGL 105 Themes in Literature

ENGL 106 Special Topics in Multicultural & World Literature

ENGL 201 Studies in Poetry
 
ENGL 202 Studies in Fiction
 
ENGL 203 Studies in Drama
 
ENGL 204 Studies in Film
 
ENGL 286 Special Topics in Form
 

One of the following English History courses:

3 credits
ENGL 205 Studies in Shakespeare

ENGL 206H Honors Literature II

ENGL 207 Literature of Western Civilization I

ENGL 208 Literature of Western Civilization II

ENGL 210 British Literature Survey I

ENGL 220 British Literature Survey II

ENGL 230 Survey of American Literature

ENGL 240 Topics: Multicultural Literature

ENGL 260 Topics: World Literature

ENGL 287 Special Topics in Literary History

Upper Division
300/400 Literature 1660 or Before (see list of courses below under the Literature Concentration)  3 credits 
300/400 Multicultural Distribution (may double count with another requirement)  0-3 credits
ENGL 306 *Special Topics in Writing
 
ENGL 314 Multicultural Literature of the US
 
ENGL 316 Studies in Post-Colonial Literature
 
ENGL 318 African-American Literature
 
ENGL 366 *Themes in Literature (Florence) 
 
ENGL 406 *Advanced Special Topics Writing
 
ENGL 418 American Indian Literatures
 
ENGL 440 Literature of the Americas
 
ENGL 455 *Special Topics in American Literature
 
ENGL 460 *Studies in Women Writers
 
ENGL 466 *Topics in Literature
 
ENGL 467 *Special Topics
 
*Indicates Department Chair’s approval needed for using this course as a requirement.
 
   
Choose one of the following two concentrations:   

 

Literature Concentration: 27 credits

 
Literature 1660 or Before**
3 credits
ENGL 323 Medieval Literature: Rage and Romance

ENGL 330 Shakespeare

ENGL 331 Renaissance Literature

ENGL 366 *Topics in Literature (Florence)

ENGL 367 Love in the Renaissance (Florence)

ENGL 420 Beowulf: In-Laws and Out-Laws

ENGL 423 Chaucer

ENGL 433 Milton and His Contemporaries

ENGL 434 Tudor and Stuart Drama

ENGL 460 *Studies in Women Writers

ENGL 466 *Topics in Literature

British Literature 1660-1914
3 credits
ENGL 340 Romantic Age

ENGL 342 Victorian Era

ENGL 348 Restoration and 18th Century Literature

ENGL 350 20th Century British Literature

ENGL 360 *Modern Drama

ENGL 436 18th Century British Novel

ENGL 438 Restoration and 18th Century Drama

ENGL 446 19th Century British Novel

ENGL 460 *Studies in Women Writers

ENGL 462 *Studies in the Novel

ENGL 466 *Topics in Literature

American Literature Pre-1914
3 credits
ENGL 310 American Literature I

ENGL 311 American Literature II

ENGL 313 American Narratives

ENGL 318 *African-American Literature
 
ENGL 413 19th Century American Novel

ENGL 455 *Special Topics in American Literature

ENGL 460 *Studies in Women Writers

ENGL 462 *Studies in the Novel

ENGL 466 *Topics in Literature

Literature Post-1914
6 credits
ENGL 312 American Literature III

ENGL 314 Multicultural Literature of the United States

ENGL 318 African-American Literature

ENGL 360 *Modern Drama

ENGL 368 20th Century Novel (Florence)

ENGL 394 *Topics in Film

ENGL 414 20th Century American Novel

ENGL 415 Recent American Writing

ENGL 418 American Indian Literatures

ENGL 440 Literature of the Americas

ENGL 450 20th Century British Novel
 
ENGL 455 *Special Topics in American Literature

ENGL 460 *Studies in Women Writers

ENGL 462 *Studies in the Novel

ENGL 464 Studies in 20th Century Poetry

ENGL 465 Studies in 20th Century Drama

ENGL 466 *Topics in Literature

300/400 Non-Literature Broadening 3 credits
300/400 Level Writing (see Writing Concentration below for writing courses) 
 
ENGL 480 Critical Theory
 
ENGL 497 Internship
 
300/400 Electives  6 credits
ENGL 495 Senior Seminar 3 credits
ENGL 499 Senior Project 0 credits

Note: No single course can satisfy more than one requirement except for the Multicultural Distribution courses listed.
*Indicates Department Chair’s approval needed for using this course as a requirement.
**Literature students complete an additional 3 credits of Literature 1660 or before for a total of 6 credits.



Writing Concentration: 27 Credits

300/400 Literature Electives (see Literature Concentration above for literature courses)  12 credits
Five of the following writing courses:  
15 credits
ENGL 300 Research and Writing for Major

ENGL 301 Poetry Writing

ENGL 302 Fiction Writing

ENGL 303 Creative Non-Fiction Writing

ENGL 304 Professional Writing

ENGL 305 The Writing Traveler

ENGL 306 Special Topics in Writing

ENGL 307 Typography and Book Design
 
ENGL 308 The Art(s) of Editing
 
ENGL 309 Writing for Social Action
ENGL 390 Writing Center Practicum

ENGL 395 The Teaching of Writing

ENGL 401 Advanced Poetry Writing

ENGL 402 Advanced Fiction Writing

ENGL 403 Advanced Nonfiction Writing

ENGL 406 Advanced Special Topics in Writing

ENGL 498 Independent Study

JOUR 420 Literary Journalism

THEA 440 Playwriting

ENGL 496 Writing Senior Project 0 credits

Note: Students must take at least one 400 level writing course.


Minor in English: 21 Credits

Lower Division
One of the following three courses: 3 credits
ENGL 101 Writing

ENGL 103H Honors Literature I

ENGL 200 Intermediate Composition

One of the following four courses:
3 credits
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literature

ENGL 104H Honors Literature II

ENGL 105 Themes in Literature

ENGL 106 Special Topics in Multicultural or World Literature

200 level literature 3 credits
CLAS 220 Introduction to Classical Literature

ENGL 201 Studies in Poetry

ENGL 202 Studies in Fiction

ENGL 203 Studies in Drama

ENGL 204 Studies in Film

ENGL 205 Studies in Shakespeare

ENGL 206H Honors Literature III

ENGL 207 Literature of Western Civilization I

ENGL 208 Literature of Western Civilization II

ENGL 210 British Literature Survey I

ENGL 220 British Literature Survey II

ENGL 230 Survey of American Literature

ENGL 240 Topics: Multicultural Literature

ENGL 260 Topics: World Literature

ENGL 285 Special Topics

ENGL 286 Special Topics in Form
 
ENGL 287 Special Topics in History
 
Upper Division
ENGL 300-ENGL 489 Electives 12 credits

Minor in Writing: 21 Credits

Lower Division
One of the following three courses: 3 credits
ENGL 101 Writing

ENGL 103H Honors Literature I

ENGL 200 Intermediate Composition

One of the following four courses:
3 credits
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literature

ENGL 104H Honors Literature II

ENGL 105 Themes in Literature

ENGL 106 Special Topics in Multicultural or World Literature

200 level literature
3 credits
CLAS 220 Introduction to Classical Literature

ENGL 201 Studies in Poetry

ENGL 202 Studies in Fiction

ENGL 203 Studies in Drama

ENGL 204 Studies in Film

ENGL 205 Studies in Shakespeare

ENGL 206H Honors Literature III

ENGL 207 Literature of Western Civilization I

ENGL 208 Literature of Western Civilization II

ENGL 210 British Literature Survey I

ENGL 220 British Literature Survey II

ENGL 230 Survey of American Literature

ENGL 240 Topics: Multicultural Literature

ENGL 260 Topics: World Literature

ENGL 285 Special Topics

ENGL 286 Special Topics in Form
 
ENGL 287 Special Topics in History
 
Upper Division
Writing Electives  
9 credits
ENGL 300 Research and Writing for Majors

ENGL 301 Poetry Writing

ENGL 302 Fiction Writing

ENGL 303 Creative Non-Fiction Writing

ENGL 305 The Writing Traveler

ENGL 306 Special Topics in Writing

ENGL 307 Typography and Book Design
 
ENGL 308 The Art(s) of Editing
 
ENGL 309 Writing for Social Action
ENGL 390 Writing Center Practicum

ENGL 395 The Teaching of Writing

ENGL 401 Advanced Poetry Writing

ENGL 402 Advanced Fiction Writing

ENGL 403 Advanced Nonfiction Writing

ENGL 406 Advanced Special Topics in Writing

JOUR 420 Literary Journalism

ENGL 492 Independent Study in Writing

Upper division literature 3 credits


Lower Division
ENGL 101 Writing
3.00 credits
This course helps students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. Students will learn a variety of approaches to writing, sharpen critical reading and information literacy skills, and produce formal and informal texts that ethically and persuasively appeal to a range of audiences for distinct purposes.
ENGL 101H Writing Honors
3.00 credits
This course helps students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. Students will learn a variety of approaches to writing, sharpen critical reading and information literacy skills, and produce formal and informal texts that ethically and persuasively appeal to a range of audiences for distinct purposes.
ENGL 102 Intro to Literature
3.00 credits
This course exposes students to a range of literary genres and assists students in developing and articulating ideas about texts in oral and written form.
ENGL 103H Honors Literature I
3.00 credits
A survey of literature in the Western tradition from the Classical to Renaissance periods. The equivalent of ENGL 101 or ENGL 200 for Honors students.
Prerequisite:
HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
ENGL 104H Honors Literature I
3.00 credits
A survey of Literature in the Western tradition since the Renaissance. The equivalent of ENGL 102, ENGL 105, or ENGL 106 for Honors students.
Prerequisite:
HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
ENGL 105 Themes in Literature
3.00 credits
This course introduces students to literary study through the exploration of a particular theme. This course exposes students to a range of literary genres and assists students in developing and articulating ideas about texts in oral and written form.
ENGL 106 Sp Top:Multicltrl & World Lit
3.00 credits
This course introduces students to literature through works produced by different minority groups in America and/or by cultures throughout the world. This course exposes students to a range of literary genres and assists students in developing and articulating ideas about texts in oral and written form.
ENGL 190 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty. Permission from Department Chair required.
ENGL 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
ENGL 200 Intermediate Composition
3.00 credits
Building upon skills developed in earlier courses that required writing, students will engage in a deliberate study of the art and craft of writing and give special emphasis to building a multi-genre portfolio of their original writing.
Prerequisite:
ENGL 101 Minimum Grade: D
ENGL 201 Studies in Poetry
3.00 credits
The study of poetry, with emphasis on the major elements: imagery, tone, rhythm, etc.; practice in effective critical writing focused on explication and interpretation of poems.
ENGL 202 Studies in Fiction
3.00 credits
The study of fiction, with emphasis on the major elements of narrative form: plot, character, point of view, etc.; practice in effective critical writing focused on textual analysis and interpretation of short stories and novels.
Equivalent:
WGST 220C - OK if taken since Fall 2009
ENGL 203 Studies in Drama
3.00 credits
The study of drama, with emphasis on major elements of dramatic form: action, audience, structure, character, etc.; practice in effective writing focused on close reading and interpretation of plays. Readings will include a variety of types and forms that reflect the traditions of the genre.
ENGL 204 Studies in Film
3.00 credits
A survey of the history of film from Edison to today. Students will study major figures and movements, the essential terms and ideas of film-making, and technical advances from silent through contemporary films.
Equivalent:
WGST 221 - OK if taken since Spring 2010
ENGL 205 Studies in Shakespeare
3.00 credits
An introductory survey of Shakespeare's histories, comedies, and tragedies as well as the sonnets; close textual analysis.
ENGL 206H Honors Literature II
3.00 credits
A capstone course for Honors students providing an in-depth study in a specific area of literary approaches. Examples include a specific genre, historical/literary period, theme, author, etc.
Prerequisite:
ENGL 101 Minimum Grade: D and HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
ENGL 207 Lit of Western Civilization I
3.00 credits
This course is a survey of Classical, Medieval and Renaissance literature of the Western tradition.
ENGL 208 Lit Western Civilization II
3.00 credits
This course is a survey of the Western tradition in literature since the Renaissance.
ENGL 210 British Literature Survey I
3.00 credits
This course is a survey of British literature through the 18th Century.
ENGL 220 British Literature Survey II
3.00 credits
This course is a survey of British literature since the 18th Century.
ENGL 230 Survey of American Literature
3.00 credits
This course examines a selection of representative American writers from the Colonial period to the present.
ENGL 240 Top: Multcultural Literature
3.00 credits
This course examines literature produced by different social, ethnic and racial groups within the United States.
ENGL 260 Top:World Literature
3.00 credits
This course examines selected authors, themes and historical periods in world literature with emphasis on works outside the Western tradition.
ENGL 285 Special Topics
3.00 credits
This course provides special offerings in English literature that may not fit under other 200-level course offering descriptions. Topics will be approved by the Department Chair.
ENGL 286 Special Topics in Form
3.00 credits
This course provides special offerings in English form that may not fit under other 200-level course offering descriptions. Topics will be approved by the Department Chair.
ENGL 287 Special Topics: Lit History
3.00 credits
This course provides special offerings in English history that may not fit under other 200-level course offering descriptions. Topics will be approved by the Department Chair.
ENGL 291 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
Upper Division
ENGL 300 Research & Writing for Majors
3.00 credits
Students will learn how to engage in academic discourse through research-informed writing.
ENGL 301 Poetry Writing
3.00 credits
The practice of poetry writing.
ENGL 302 Fiction Writing
3.00 credits
The practice of fiction writing.
ENGL 303 Creative Non-Fiction Writing
3.00 credits
The practice of writing creative non-fiction.
ENGL 305 The Writing Traveler
3.00 credits
The practice of writing poetry, fiction, and essays in the context of foreign travel and residency.
ENGL 306 Special Topics in Writing
3.00 credits
A study of writing practices within a focused context. Possible examples include: the intersection of visual media and written texts; ekphrastic writing; nature writing; and/or specific study of the relationship between writing and place.
ENGL 307 Typography and Book Design
3.00 credits
This course offers students an introduction to design for literary publishing. Students; investigate ethical concerns related to presenting content; grow conversant with essentials of typography and print design; gain basic competency with industry-standard software, and produce content for both print and e-book formats. Major assignments will build on one another, and successful students will complete the course with a portfolio of print designs and a complete e-publication.
ENGL 308 The Art(s) of Editing
3.00 credits
We all know that good writers benefit from good editors, but we don't necessarily understand what editors do. This course offers a practicum for students who may want to go into an editorial field, who want to serve other writers, or who want to understand publishing more holistically. Students will undertake typical editorial practices, such as using a house style, shaping manuscript submissions, copyediting, and creating indexes for publications. Where possible and appropriate, students will work on-and get named credit for contributing to­-active publishing projects.
ENGL 309 Writing for Social Action
3.00 credits
This course investigates current and historical social movement writing and rhetorics to determine the best practices in advocating for a social cause, producing persuasive public texts, and understanding the rhetorical foundations of advocacy writing. Students will be asked to produce materials in a range of genres associated with writing for social action (e.g., letters, essays, poetry, embodied activism) and actively participate in class discussions and writing workshops. Fall, odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite:
ENGL 101 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 103H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 200 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
SOSJ 366 - OK if taken since Fall 2018
ENGL 310 American Literature I
3.00 credits
Colonial American literature to the early Romantic movement of the 1830s and 1840s.
ENGL 311 American Literature II
3.00 credits
American literature from 1840-1900.
Equivalent:
WGST 323C - OK if taken since Fall 2009
ENGL 312 American Literature III
3.00 credits
American literature from 1900 to present.
Equivalent:
WGST 326C - OK if taken since Fall 2009
ENGL 313 American Narratives
3.00 credits
Over 200 years of literature relating to the aspirations and fears of colonists/Americans, from 1620 to 1854.
ENGL 314 Multicultural Lit of the US
3.00 credits
Literature produced by different social, ethnic and racial groups in the U.S.
ENGL 316 Studies in Post Colonial Lit
3.00 credits
Works written in English by writers responding to the impact of Western colonization and imperialism.
ENGL 318 African-American Literature
3.00 credits
A study of African-American writers.
Equivalent:
WGST 325C - OK if taken since Fall 2009
ENGL 323 Medieval Lit:Rage&Romance
3.00 credits
This course is a general survey of English literature in the Middle Ages. Students will encounter the major texts, themes and genres recorded in Old English and Middle English.
ENGL 330 Shakespeare
3.00 credits
Selected plays and poetry.
ENGL 331 Renaissance Literature
3.00 credits
British literature covering the period 1500-1700, excluding drama.
ENGL 340 The Romantic Age
3.00 credits
British writers of the Romantic period, 1798-1832, with emphasis on poetry.
ENGL 342 Victorian Era
3.00 credits
Writers of the Victorian Era, 1832-1901, with emphasis on poetry.
ENGL 348 Restoration & 18th Century Lit
3.00 credits
Major prose, drama and poetry from 1660-1800, exclusive of the novel.
ENGL 350 Twentieth Century British Lit
3.00 credits
British literature of the Twentieth Century including poetry, drama and prose.
ENGL 360 Modern Drama
3.00 credits
This course will cover a broad sweep of plays from the modern and contemporary eras of drama, emphasizing the beginnings of dramatic modernism in Nineteenth-Century continental Europe (texts to be read in translation), as well as the development of drama in Britain and America from the late Nineteenth Century to the present.
ENGL 366 Themes in Literature
3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty. Florence campus only.
ENGL 367 Love inthe Renaissance
3.00 credits
This course addresses the centrality of love in the Renaissance literature in its conceptual and aesthetic complexity. Spring, Florence campus only.
ENGL 368 20th Century Novel
3.00 credits
This course, a blend of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies, is a journey that begins with the Ancient Greeks and somehow also ends with the Ancient Greeks: their culture, their myths, their literature, and their discoveries. Through reading and discussion of some 20th century novels, it will follow the path travelled by modern man and woman by focusing on cultural evolution and attitudes shaped by social context, especially during the 19th and 20th centuries. Fall and Spring, Florence campus only.
ENGL 390 Writing Center Practicum
.00- 3.00 credits
Students tutor in the Writing Center under the supervision of the Writing Center Director. May satisfy the English Teach Ed endorsement writing pedagogies requirement usually fulfilled by ENGL 395, with prior permission from Department Chair. Requires written permission from both the instructor and the Chair.
ENGL 391 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
ENGL 394 Topics in Film
3.00 credits
An examination of narrower topics in film which may include: the film traditions of other nations (e.g. France, Italy, Japan, or Russia); periods (silent films of the 1920s; French New Wave; American film of the 1970s); or themes (e.g. the Western from Porter to Eastwood or Shakespeare on film). The course will include significant readings from major critics (e.g. James Agee's reviews and essays) and filmmakers (e.g. Truffaut on the auteur).
ENGL 395 The Teaching of Writing
3.00 credits
Students will demonstrate their ability to research and respond to theories and practices pertaining to composing and to the teaching of writing. They will acquire this ability, in part, by writing about and discussing observations of writers in action, by reflecting critically on their own composing processes, and by reading and responding to writing from a variety of genres. Key specific learning outcomes include translating theory into practice and discussing the politics and assessment of language as applied to written English in a variety of rhetorical settings. Required for students seeking teacher certification.
ENGL 401 Advanced Poetry Writing
3.00 credits
An intensive exploration of the practice of writing poetry. Specific sections may focus on subgenres including lyrical poetry, narrative poetry, and/or the long poem.
ENGL 402 Advanced Fiction Writing
3.00 credits
An intensive exploration of the practice of writing fiction. Specific sections may focus on subgenres including the novella, flash fiction, and/or chapters within a novel.
ENGL 403 Advanced Nonfiction Writing
3.00 credits
An intensive and challenging exploration of the practice of writing nonfiction. Specific sections may focus on the intersection of nonfiction writing and focused subject matter.
ENGL 406 Adv Special Topics in Writing
3.00 credits
An intensive and challenging study on writing practices within a focused context. Possible examples include: writing and philosophy, writing and questions of social justice, environmental writing, and/or writing and mysticism.
ENGL 413 19th Century American Novel
3.00 credits
Major American novels of the period 1800-1900.
ENGL 414 20th Century American Novel
3.00 credits
Selected major novelists of the 20th Century.
ENGL 415 Recent American Writing
3.00 credits
American prose and poetry since World War II.
ENGL 418 American Indian Literatures
3.00 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to several important texts in the multifaceted genre of American Indian literature as well as to invite students into a critical discussion of contemporary issues centering on the relationship between American Indian literatures and contemporary sociopolitical and cultural realities and issues. We will examine the role of American Indian literature in the continual process of cultural maintenance as well as identity (re)construction. Through close reading of texts by writers from various tribes and regions, students will explore the heterogeneity of Native America and the complexities of all attempts to define or shape indigenous nationhood in the United States. We will contextualize these texts in discussions of social justice issues particular to Native America, including but not limited to the five definitions of genocide; geographical and cultural displacements; and "third world" living conditions. We will also be engaged in dialogues about local and national American Indian cultures in cooperation with the American Indian Studies house on campus. Spring, odd numbered years.
Equivalent:
NTAS 321 - OK if taken since Fall 2014
ENGL 420 Beowulf: In-Laws and Out Laws
3.00 credits
Language and literary study of the Old English period with special emphasis on the anonymous epic poem Beowulf.
ENGL 423 Chaucer
3.00 credits
Chaucer's principal works in the original language.
ENGL 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
ENGL 433 Milton & His Contemporaries
3.00 credits
Poetry and prose from the 17th Century with particular emphasis on Milton.
ENGL 434 Tudor & Stuart Drama
3.00 credits
Principal plays 1520-1640, excluding Shakespeare.
ENGL 436 18th Century British Novel
3.00 credits
The British novel from 1700-1800.
ENGL 438 Restoration 18th C Brit Drama
3.00 credits
British drama from the re-opening of the London stages in 1660 through 1800.
ENGL 440 Literature of the Americas
3.00 credits
A study in contemporary American literature inclusive of texts and writers from Canada, the U.S., and all of Latin America.
ENGL 446 19th Century British Novel
3.00 credits
The British novel from 1800-1900.
ENGL 450 20th Century British Novel
3.00 credits
The British novel from 1900 and 2000.
ENGL 450L 19th/20th Century Novel
4.00 credits
19th/20th Century novel.
ENGL 455 Special Topics in American Lit
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topics to be determined by faculty.
ENGL 460 Studies in Women Writers
3.00 credits
Selected authors and themes.
ENGL 462 Studies in the Novel
3.00- 4.00 credits
Selected authors and themes.
ENGL 464 Studies in 20th Century Poetry
3.00 credits
A study of poetry written in English since 1900.
ENGL 465 Studies in 20th Century Drama
3.00 credits
Major figures of the modern European and American theater since 1900.
ENGL 466 Topics in Literature
3.00 credits
Selected authors or themes.
ENGL 467 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
The course will tie in to the Florence experience and will require reading literature in English or in translation. Topic to be determined by faculty.
ENGL 480 Crit Theory:Lit & Cltrl Stdy
3.00 credits
Theories about the nature of literature and criticism.
Equivalent:
WGST 403 - OK if taken since Spring 2010
ENGL 485 Poetics
3.00 credits
This course will study English Language poetry from Chaucer to present. Focus on the "formal" qualities of poetry.
ENGL 490 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
A directed program of readings and written responses.
ENGL 492 Independent Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Courses which allow the individual student to engage in interdepartmental and interdisciplinary study. Credit by arrangement.
ENGL 495 Senior Seminar
3.00 credits
A focused, in-depth study of a literary/cultural topic chosen by the instructor. The course will familiarize students with the critical conversation surrounding the topic, prepare them to engage in this and similar conversations, and have them enter into this conversation through well-informed, well-argued, research-based, critical study that will constitute the written aspect of the Senior Project. Required for English Majors. Senior standing or permission of Department Chair. To be taken concurrently with ENGL 499.
Concurrent:
ENGL 499
ENGL 496 Writing Senior Project
.00 credits
This course is required of students pursuing the Writing Concentration in the English major and consists of these chief components: 1) a critical/historical review contextualizing the student's creative work in literary tradition and 2) an original creative manuscript of the student's poetry/prose/drama/non-fiction.
ENGL 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional experience in literature- or writing-related field. Students must take the initiative to contact an agency and an English Department faculty member willing to supervise the internship. Does not count towards program electives for the major or minor.
ENGL 498 Directed Research
1.00- 3.00 credits
A directed program in which the individual student will engage in approved research activity and submit a scholarly paper or papers.
ENGL 499 Senior Project
.00 credits
Academic paper produced in Senior Seminar (ENGL 495). Required for English majors. To be taken concurrently with ENGL 495.
Concurrent:
ENGL 495
 
Second Language Competency

Competency in a second language (classical or modern) at the intermediate level (courses numbered 201) is required for students continuing in the study of a language. Students beginning study in a language they have not previously studied can fulfill the requirement by completing one year at the beginning level (courses numbered 101-102). Non-native speakers of English who have completed the required English core credits at Gonzaga may petition the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences for a waiver of this requirement.

Additional information on this requirement can be found at

Language Requirement Information

 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.