Classical Civilizations

Chairperson: Dave Oosterhuis
Professors: A. L. Goldman, P. Hartin (Emeritus), F. Schlatter, S.J. (Emeritus)
Associate Professor:  D. Oosterhuis
Senior Lecturer: K. Krall, S.J.


The Department of Classical Civilizations – the oldest at our University – provides undergraduates with access to over 2,500 years of human experience drawn from the multicultural world of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Coursework emphasizes the history, material culture, mores, and values of the societies that have helped shape Western civilization, drawing attention to the significant achievements of the past and the considerable impact of their legacy upon the present.

The department offers both a B.A. major (36 credits) and a B.A. minor (23 credits) degrees in Classical Civilizations. All majors and minors are required to complete two (2) upper division CLAS courses as part of the degree, as well as a minimum of at least three (3) language courses in either Latin or Greek up to and including the completion of a 201 level class. Students who elect to pursue a major degree in this program must choose a focus in either Latin or Greco-Roman Civilization and complete four (4) elective courses among those listed in the current catalog as well as a senior thesis (CLAS 499; offered only in the Fall semester) appropriate to the chosen concentration. Minors are required to select three (3) upper level electives from among those listed in this catalog. The electives encompass a range of disciplines, including history, archaeology, philosophy, religious studies, and intermediate and advanced Latin and Greek. Majors are required to include at least one (1) course in Greek culture and one (1) course in Roman culture from among the elective offerings. Participating students are thus required to complete a balanced curriculum divided between the study of ancient languages (Latin, Greek) and their contemporary societies. Through this combined focus, students gain a broader comprehension and appreciation of the rich cultural and humanistic heritage stemming from the classical world. The ancients themselves embraced this model of liberal arts education; according to the Roman orator Cicero, such cultural and historical study “illumines reality, vitalizes memory, provides guidance in daily life and brings us tidings of antiquity.”

The program’s courses are by nature interdisciplinary, with application to the sciences, art, theater, literature, philosophy, religion, politics, and government. Moreover, through addressing relevant issues of gender, ethnicity, and interaction between cultures, the curriculum reaches well beyond the borders of Greece and Rome to embrace other civilizations across the world and time. By immersing students in an examination of the languages and ethnically diverse societies of antiquity, the program prepares them for careers within a world that is increasingly multicultural, interdependent, and global in outlook, in such fields as politics, ethics, business, law, sciences and education. The department will meet the needs of three classes of students: (1) those who wish a major or minor in Classical Civilizations; (2) those who wish to begin or continue the study of Latin or Greek in support of other majors or in preparation for advanced work in other areas; and (3) those who wish to fulfill the language competency requirement in the Arts and Sciences common curriculum by taking one of the classical languages.

B.A. Major in Classical Civilizations: 36 Credits

Lower Division

Language Courses:

12 credits
LATN 101-LATN 102 or LATN 103; LATN 201
GREK 101-GREK 102 or GREK 103; GREK 201
GREK 151-GREK 152; GREK 251
CLAS 100-299
   (To be completed by the end of the sophomore year)
3 credits
Upper Division
Two (2) Classical (CLAS) courses
6 credits
One of the following courses: 3 credits
HIST 302 The Ancient City
HIST 303 Athens in the 5th century BC
HIST 304 Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World
HIST 305 The Roman Republic
HIST 306 The Roman Empire
HIST 307 Archaeology of Ancient Greece
HIST 308 Archaeology of Ancient Rome
(Other courses may fulfill this requirement with prior permission from the Department Chair.)
Three (3) Elective courses*
   (At least one of the three courses must be 300-400 level courses)
9 credits
CLAS 499 Senior Thesis 3 credits

Students MUST focus in either Latin or Greco-Roman Civilization

*Focus in Latin Language and Authors
LATN 210 Reading Latin 3 credits
LATN 301 Republican Latin Prose I 3 credits
LATN 302 Imperial Latin Prose II 3 credits
LATN 303 Republican Latin Poetry I 3 credits
LATN 304 Imperial Latin Poetry II 3 credits
LATN 305 Vergil 3 credits
LATN 310 Medieval Latin 3 credits
LATN 491 Independent Study (Latin) 1-4 credits

*Focus in Greco-Roman Civilization

This selection MUST include one (1) course in Greek culture and one (1) course in Roman culture.

The following courses fulfill the Greek culture requirement:
CLAS 310 Greek Gods and Heroes 3 credits
CLAS 320 The Iliad and the Odyssey 3 credits
CLAS 330 Women in Antiquity 3 credits
CLAS 350 Love Poetry in Antiquity 3 credits
CLAS 370 Peoples and Empires of Turkey 3 credits
CLAS 410 Topics in Greek Civilization 3 credits
GREK 210 Reading Attic Greek 3 credits
GREK 260 Reading New Testament Greek 3 credits
GREK 290 Directed Study 3 credits
GREK 291 Independent Study 3 credits
GREK 491 Independent Reading Course 1-4 credits
HIST 302 The Ancient City 3 credits
HIST 303 Athens in the 5th century BC 3 credits
HIST 304 Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World 3 credits
HIST 307 Archaeology of Ancient Greece 3 credits
PHIL 305 History of Ancient Philosophy 3 credits
PHIL 414 Ancient Concepts of Justice 3 credits

The following courses fulfill the Roman Culture requirement:

CLAS 330 Women in Antiquity 3 credits
CLAS 340 Roman Epic 3 credits
CLAS 350 Love Poetry in Antiquity 3 credits
CLAS 370 Peoples and Empires of Turkey 3 credits
CLAS 420 Topic in Roman Civilization 3 credits
HIST 302 The Ancient City 3 credits
HIST 305 The Roman Republic 3 credits
HIST 306 The Roman Empire 3 credits
HIST 308 Archaeology of Ancient Rome 3 credits
LATN 210 Reading Latin 3 credits
LATN 491 Independent Reading Course 1-4 credits
PHIL 305 History of Ancient Philosophy 3 credits
PHIL 414 Ancient Concepts of Justice 3 credits
RELI 417 Christians, Romans and Jews 3 credits
RELI 443 The Early Church 3 credits

The following courses fulfill general elective requirements:

CLAS 360 Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 3 credits
RELI 496A Classical Hebrew I 3 credits
RELI 496B Classical Hebrew II 3 credits

Minor in Classical Civilizations: 23 credits

Lower Division
Two (2) Language Courses  
8 credits
 
 LATN 101-LATN 102 or LATN 103
 
 
 GREK 101-GREK 102 or GREK 103
 
 
 GREK 151-GREK 152
 
One of the following two courses:
3 credits
 
 CLAS 110 Introduction to the Ancient World
 
 
 CLAS 220 Introduction to Classical Literature
 
Upper Division
One CLAS course at any level 3 credits
Three Electives:
Selected from any of the following seven (7) disciplinary perspectives:
9 credits
Latin Language:
LATN 201 Latin III
LATN 210 Reading Latin 3 credits
LATN 300-400 level
Greek Language:
GREK 201 Greek III
GREK 210 Reading Attic Greek 3 credits
GREK 251 Biblical Greek III
GREK 260 Reading New Testament Greek 3 credits
GREK 300-400 level
Archaeology:
HIST 302 The Ancient City 3 credits
HIST 307 Archaeology of Ancient Greece 3 credits
HIST 308 Archaeology of Ancient Rome 3 credits
History:
HIST 303 Athens in the 5th Century 3 credits
HIST 304 Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World 3 credits
HIST 305 The Roman Republic 3 credits
HIST 306 The Roman Empire 3 credits
Philosophy:
PHIL 305 History of Ancient Philosophy 3 credits
PHIL 414 Ancient Concepts of Justice 3 credits
Religious Studies:
RELI 417 Christians, Romans and Jews 3 credits
RELI 443 The Early Church 3 credits
Hebrew Language:
RELI 496A Classical Hebrew I 3 credits
RELI 496B Classical Hebrew II 3 credits
Lower Division
CLAS 110 Intro to the Ancient World
3.00 credits
An introductory survey to the origins of Western civilization in the Mediterranean world, with particular focus on the Classical cultures of Greece and Rome. The course will focus upon an exploration of these ancient societies, their origins and structure, their social and political constructs, and their neighbors and worldviews. Particular emphasis will be placed upon examining the enduring legacies produced by these ancient peoples and their continuing influence upon the concepts and ideals valued by our contemporary Western culture.
CLAS 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
CLAS 220 Intro to Classical Literature
3.00 credits
This course is a survey of the literature of the ancient Greeks and Romans. It introduces students to the important authors of Classical Antiquity, the critical issues surrounding their work, and their lasting influence. It stresses the role that ancient authors had in shaping our understanding of literature: its genres, methods, and subject matter. Fulfills 200-level ENGL literature requirement. Spring.
Upper Division
CLAS 310 Greek Gods & Heroes
3.00 credits
A study of Greek Mythology that uses texts (in translation), architecture and archaeology to explore the most important characters and stories of Greek mythology that have become part of the art, literature and imagination of western civilization. This course gives students insight into approaches toward the understanding of myth, especially classical myth that are helpful for their own studies and interests. Fall.
CLAS 320 The Iliad & the Odyssey
3.00 credits
This course explores (in translation) Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, two poems that are among the foundations of the literature of Western Civilization. Students will demonstrate an ability to read and analyze these two great epics of ancient Greece in a way that appreciates and unlocks their timeless beauty, depth and significance especially in a way that is helpful for their own studies and interests. Spring, alternate years.
CLAS 330 Women in Antiquity
3.00 credits
An examination of the representation of women Greece and Rome through image and text, using a variety of literary, art historical, and archaeological sources. This course is intended both to illuminate the lives of women in Classical Antiquity and to demonstrate how this illumination is important for a full understanding of the societies of Greece (in particular, Athens) and Rome. Students also gain valuable experience in thinking critically about sources, both ancient and modern. Fall, alternate years.
CLAS 340 Roman Epic
3.00 credits
This course explores (in translation) two of Rome's great contributions to world literature: Vergil's Aeneid and Lucan's Civil War. These works are at the core of the western tradition. They have been read and reinterpreted for millennia and continue to find resonance today. Students learn to read and analyze these poems closely, to appreciate them, and to unlock their timeless beauty, depth and significance. Special attention is paid to applying the themes of these works to student's own lives and studies. Fall, alternate years.
CLAS 350 Love Poetry in Antiquity
3.00 credits
Is love a modern invention? This course looks at the phenomenon of love as it appears in the poetry of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Works read (in translation) will include those of Sappho, Callimachus, Catullus Ovid and others. Students will investigate ancient attitudes towards love, sex, and gender roles while developing an appreciation for the differences between time periods, authors, style, and genre. Students will also explore the long-lasting influence of this poetry and find ways to apply it to their own studies and interests.
CLAS 360 Ancient N. Eastern Archaeology
3.00 credits
Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology will introduce the student to the archaeology of Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Levant. Archaeological methodology, the history of excavation of ancient sites and material culture will be examined as well as ancient languages, literature and history.
CLAS 370 Peoples and Empires of Turkey
3.00 credits
This course will provide students with a comprehensive survey of major historical and cultural developments associated with ancient civilizations in Turkey. Using primary textual and archaeological sources, course content will focus upon investigating key trends and cultural movements originating in early societies and ancient empires, from the advent of our earliest known human settlements to the impact of the imperial domination within the Mediterranean basin. Offered as Study Abroad/Summer Course only.
Prerequisite:
HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D
CLAS 375 Topics in Classic Civilization
3.00 credits
A course offering the student an opportunity to study literature of the Classical world in translation. Offered annually.
CLAS 410 Topics in Greek Civilization
3.00 credits
A course offering the student an opportunity to study aspects of classical civilization, with a specialized focus on aspects of the Greek world and its culture. Offered annually.
CLAS 420 Topics in Roman Civilization
3.00 credits
A course offering the student an opportunity to study aspects of classical civilization, with a specialized focus on aspects of the Roman world and its culture. Offered annually.
CLAS 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
CLAS 490 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Study requires completion of a form and Dept. permission, and cannot be registered for via Zagweb.
CLAS 491 Independent Study
.00- 7.00 credits
CLAS 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional work experience related to classical civilizations.
CLAS 499 Senior Thesis
3.00 credits
The senior thesis is required for majors in Classical Civilizations in their fourth year. Offered annually in the Fall semester.
 
Lower Division
GREK 101 Greek I
4.00 credits
A beginner's course in Attic Greek: grammar, composition, and easy prose selections. Fall, alternate years.
GREK 102 Greek II
4.00 credits
Continuation of GREK 101 and more advanced grammar, composition and readings. Spring, alternate years.
Prerequisite:
GREK 101 Minimum Grade: D
GREK 103 Accelerated Elementary Greek
7.00 credits
This is an entry-level course, with no pre-requisite, designed to provide the equivalent of the first-year Greek (Attic) sequence GREK 101-102. It therefore prepares students for GREK 201. Students will learn the fundamentals of Greek vocabulary, grammar, and syntax in order to develop the skills necessary for basic translation and composition of Greek texts.
GREK 151 Biblical Greek I
4.00 credits
A beginner's course in New Testament Greek: grammar, composition, and easy prose selections. Fall, alternate years.
GREK 152 Biblical Greek II
4.00 credits
Continuation of GREK 151 and more advanced grammar, composition and readings. Spring, alternate years.
Prerequisite:
GREK 151 Minimum Grade: D
GREK 201 Greek III
4.00 credits
Continuation of GREK 102: review of forms, syntax, readings. Fall alternate years.
Prerequisite:
GREK 102 Minimum Grade: D or GREK 103 Minimum Grade: D
GREK 210 Reading Attic Greek
3.00 credits
This course develops the skill of reading unabridged, original Geek texts. The introductory sequence (GREK 101,102, 201) is pre-requisite. Students are expected to be familiar with the fundamentals of Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, and to have some experience translating. Students will learn how to integrate and synthesize those fundamentals in order to fluidly and fluently engage with extended unabridged texts in the original Greek.
Prerequisite:
GREK 201 Minimum Grade: D
GREK 251 Biblical Greek III
4.00 credits
Continuation of GREK 152: review of forms, syntax and readings. Fall, alternate years.
Prerequisite:
GREK 152 Minimum Grade: D
GREK 260 Reading New Testament Greek
3.00 credits
This course develops the skill of reading the Greek New Testament in its unabridged original form. The introductory sequence (GREK 151, 152, 251) is pre-requisite. Students are expected to be familiar with the fundamentals of Koine Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, and to have some experience translating. Students will learn how to integrate and synthesize those fundamentals in order to fluidly and fluently engage with extended unabridged texts in the original Greek
Prerequisite:
GREK 251 Minimum Grade: D
GREK 290 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by the instructor.
GREK 291 Independent Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topics to be determined by instructor.
Upper Division
GREK 490 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed study requires completion of an Individualized Study form and department permission. This course cannot be registered for via Zagweb.
Prerequisite:
GREK 210 Minimum Grade: D
GREK 491 Independent Reading Course
1.00- 4.00 credits
 
Lower Division
LATN 101 Latin I
4.00 credits
A beginner's course: grammar, composition, and easy prose selections. Fall.
LATN 102 Latin II
4.00 credits
Continuation of LATN 101 and more advanced grammar, composition and readings. Spring.
Prerequisite:
LATN 101 Minimum Grade: D
LATN 103 Accelerated Elementary Latin
8.00 credits
This is an entry-level 12-week course, with no pre-requisite, designed to provide the equivalent of the first-year Latin sequence LATN 101-102. It therefore pre-pares students for either LATN 201 or LATN 104. The course will cover approximately the first half of Wheelock's Latin. Students will learn the fundamentals of Latin vocabulary, grammar, and syntax in order to develop the skills necessary for basic translation and composition of Latin texts. Summer only.
LATN 190 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
LATN 201 Latin III
4.00 credits
Continuation of LATN 101 and 102: review of forms and syntax; composition, and readings. Fall.
Prerequisite:
LATN 102 Minimum Grade: D or LATN 103 Minimum Grade: D
LATN 203 Accelerated Latin III
8.00 credits
This 12-week course is designed to provide the equivalent of the second-year Latin sequence LATN 201-202 and therefore prepare students for LATN 301. The course will cover approximately the second half of Wheelock's Latin. Students will learn advanced Latin vocabulary, grammar, and syntax in order to master the skills necessary for translation and composition of Latin texts. Summer only.
Prerequisite:
LATN 103 Minimum Grade: D or LATN 102 Minimum Grade: D
LATN 210 Reading Latin
3.00 credits
Continuation of LATN 201. Spring.
Prerequisite:
LATN 201 Minimum Grade: D
LATN 290 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Upper Division
LATN 301 Republican Latin Prose
3.00 credits
Courses or tutorials for students who have completed the intermediate level Latin and are reading original Latin authors. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
LATN 203 Minimum Grade: C or LATN 201 Minimum Grade: C
LATN 302 Imperial Latin Prose
3.00 credits
Courses or tutorials for students who have completed the intermediate level Latin and are reading original Latin authors. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
LATN 201 Minimum Grade: C or LATN 203 Minimum Grade: C
LATN 303 Republican Latin Poetry
3.00 credits
Courses or tutorials for students who have completed the intermediate level Latin and are reading original Latin authors. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
LATN 201 Minimum Grade: C or LATN 203 Minimum Grade: C
LATN 304 Imperial Latin Poetry
3.00 credits
Courses or tutorials for students who have completed the intermediate level Latin and are reading original Latin authors. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
LATN 201 Minimum Grade: C or LATN 203 Minimum Grade: C
LATN 305 Vergil
3.00 credits
This course explores the works of the greatest of the Latin writers, the Roman poet Publius Vergilius Maro, commonly called Vergil (or Virgil). Students will read selections from all three of Vergil's canonical works, the Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid, and will learn about the poet's development, achievement, and influence. The course is designed for students who have completed intermediate level Latin and are able to read original Latin texts.
Prerequisite:
LATN 201 Minimum Grade: D or LATN 203 Minimum Grade: D
LATN 310 Medieval Latin
3.00 credits
Courses or tutorials for students who have completed the intermediate level Latin and are reading original Latin authors. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
LATN 201 Minimum Grade: D
LATN 490 Directed Study
1.00- 6.00 credits
Directed Study requires completion of a form, and Dept. permission and cannot be registered for via Zagweb.
LATN 491 Independent Reading Course
1.00- 6.00 credits
 
Second Language Competency

Competency in a second language (classical or modern) at the intermediate level (courses numbered 201) is required for students continuing in the study of a language. Students beginning study in a language they have not previously studied can fulfill the requirement by completing one year at the beginning level (courses numbered 101-102). Non-native speakers of English who have completed the required English core credits at Gonzaga may petition the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences for a waiver of this requirement.

Additional information on this requirement can be found at

Language Requirement Information

 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.