Italian Studies Program

Director: T. Haaland
Professor: G. Brooke
Associate Professors: T. Haaland, S. Nedderman

Italian Studies is an interdisciplinary program aimed at imparting an understanding of Italian culture and competence in the Italian language. The Director of the Italian Studies Program is advised by a committee formed by the chairs or representatives of the departments that offer upper division electives for Italian Studies. Meetings of the advisory committee are called by the Director of Italian Studies as needed.

The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Italian Studies includes one semester of participation in the Gonzaga-in-Florence program or comparable experience in Italy and a senior project (ITAL 498). Italian Studies majors are required to take an upper division course in Italian during their fourth year regardless of credits earned.

B.A. Major in Italian Studies: 36 Credits

or 22 credits at the 300 level and above
Lower Division Courses
ITAL 101 Elementary Italian I 3 credits
ITAL 102 Elementary Italian II 3 credits
ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian I 4 credits
ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian II 4 credits
Upper Division Courses
One of the following two courses: 3 credits
ITAL 301 Advanced Italian I

ITAL 302 Advanced Italian II

Electives (Chosen from the elective list below or any Italian course(s) listed under Modern Languages.  At least nine elective credits must be from courses taught in Italian.) 18 credits
ITAL 498 Senior Project 1 credit

Minor in Italian Studies: 26 credits

or 12 credits at the 300 level and above
Lower Division Courses
ITAL 101 Elementary Italian I 3 credits
ITAL 102 Elementary Italian II 3 credits
ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian I 4 credits
ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian II 4 credits
Upper Division Courses
One of the following four courses: 3 credits
ITAL 301 Advanced Italian I

ITAL 302 Advanced Italian II

ITAL 306 Advanced Conversation

ITAL 307 Conversational Approach to Contemporary Issues

Electives (Chosen from the elective list below or any Italian course(s) listed under Modern Languages.) 9 credits

The following courses may be applied toward electives for the major and minor in Italian Studies. No more than two courses can be taken from the same discipline (this doesn't apply to courses housed in the Italian program.) Complete course descriptions can be found under departmental listings. Courses offered in Florence which are not offered regularly and are not on this list will need the approval of the Director of Italian Studies to be used toward the major and minor in Italian Studies.

ECON 404 Economic Integration in European Communities (Florence only)
ENGL 367 Love in the Renaissance (in Florence only)
HIST 305/ITAL 363 The Roman Republic
HIST 306/ITAL 364 The Roman Empire
HIST 309 Italy: Homeland of the Romans
HIST 311/ITAL 366 Medieval Europe (in Florence only)
HIST 312/ITAL 367 Renaissance Europe (in Florence and Spokane)
HIST 336 History of Food (Florence only)
HIST 338/INST 391 Fascist Italy 
INST 381/ITAL 319 Mafia and Political Violence in Film and Literature
INST 416/ITAL 315 The Italian Cinema
ITAL 313 The World of Dante (in Florence only)
POLS 345 Machiavelli and the Romans
POLS 357 Italian Political System (in Florence only)
SOCI 378 Social Economic Development of Italy
VART 360 Museum Studies (in Florence only)
VART 393 Modern Italian Art (in Florence and Spokane)
VART 397 Renaissance Art (in Florence only)
VART 398 Roman Art and Architecture (in Florence only)
VART 401 Renaissance Architecture (in Florence only) 
VART 466/PHIL 472 Philosophy of Art (in Florence only)
Lower Division
ITAL 101 Elementary Italian I
3.00 credits
Grammar, composition, verbal practice and oral comprehension form the basis of this course. Designed to provide the student with the fundamentals of the Italian language. Fall or Spring.
ITAL 101L Elementary Italian I Lab
.00- 1.00 credits
Taken only in conjunction with ITAL 101 when taken in Florence, Italy.
Concurrent:
ITAL 101
ITAL 102 Elementary Italian II
3.00 credits
A continuation of ITAL 101. Spring (main campus) or Fall and Spring (Florence).
ITAL 102L Elementary Italian II Lab
.00- 1.00 credits
Taken only in conjunction with ITAL 102 when taken in Florence, Italy.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 101 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
ITAL 102
ITAL 105 Elementary Conversation I
3.00 credits
Students learn to use the language in a variety of everyday situations through focused practice in class and organized encounters with native speakers of Italian. Does not count toward the requirement of one year of Italian for the Florence program or the Arts and Sciences Second Language Proficiency requirement.
ITAL 106 Elementary Italian Convers II
3.00 credits
A continuation of ITAL 105. Vocabulary and grammar presented in Italian 102 are reinforced. Does not count toward the requirement of one year of Italian for the Florence program or the Arts and Sciences Second Language Proficiency requirement.
ITAL 190 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian I
4.00 credits
This course will build on existing skills in Italian, increase the ability to read, write, speak and understand the language, and introduce students to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. Fall (main campus) or Fall and Spring (Florence).
ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian II
4.00 credits
A continuation of ITAL 201. Spring.
ITAL 290 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Upper Division
ITAL 301 Advanced Italian I
3.00 credits
Advanced review of grammatical structures through conversation, readings, compositions and oral comprehension. In Italian.
ITAL 302 Advanced Italian II
3.00 credits
Advanced review of grammatical structures through conversation, readings, presentations and oral comprehension. Can be taken alone or as a continuation of ITAL 301. In Italian.
ITAL 303 Survey of Italian Literature I
3.00 credits
An overview of Italian literature from the age of Dante through the Renaissance, including Petrarch, Boccaccio and Machiavelli. In Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 304 Survey Italian Literature II
3.00 credits
An overview of Italian literature from the Renaissance through contemporary times. In Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 306 Advanced Conversation
3.00 credits
Advanced conversation for students returning from Florence. In Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 307 Conv Approach to Contemp Issue
3.00 credits
A course designed for those who wish to continue to improve their conversational skills. Taught in Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 308 Italian through Film
3.00 credits
This course uses Italian films to help students improve language proficiency and deepen their understanding of Italian history and culture. Italian cinema closely reflects national culture and each film in the course is chosen for its focus on one or more aspects of Italian society. Preparation for viewing includes background reading, thematic discussions and vocabulary building exercises. In Italian. Offered in Florence only.
ITAL 313 The World of Dante
3.00 credits
In English. This course satisfies the University Core Broadening Course Literature requirement. In this course students will engage with the history, philosophy, art, politics, and poetics of the Middle Ages through a close reading of Dante Alighieri's Commedia, Vita Nova, and other period texts. The course will also briefly consider the monumental cultural heritage that Dante's poem has and continues to produce. In class discussion, students will be expected to know, discuss, and offer interpretations of our text through their own reading and preparation based on notes provided by instructor on Blackboard. This class will emphasize close reading of primary poetic texts.
ITAL 314 Fascism in Film and Literature
3.00 credits
In English. This class examines the way fascism is presented in selected novels and films. An important objective of the course is to study the impact of Fascism on segments of the Italian population which did not conform to fascist ideals. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 315 The Italian Cinema
3.00 credits
In English. This course aims at presenting aspects of Italian society through film. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian.
Equivalent:
INST 416 - OK if taken since Spring 2007
ITAL 316 The Italian Short Story I
3.00 credits
The development of the Italian short story from its origin through the Baroque. Included are stories from the Novellino, the Decameron, the Novelliere, and the Pentameron. In Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 317 Italian Short Story II
3.00 credits
The Italian short story through the works of the nineteenth and twentieth century authors. In Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 319 Mafia & Pol Viol in Film & Lit
3.00 credits
In English. Through a study of Italian film, novels and nonfiction, this course will examine the phenomenon of organized crime in Italian society.
Equivalent:
INST 381 - Successful completion
ITAL 320 New Immigrants in Film &Lit
3.00 credits
In English. This course will explore the impact of immigration from Third World countries on Italian society through the study of novels, nonfiction and film. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian.
ITAL 322 The Italian Historical Novel
3.00 credits
In English. This course will explore the development of the historical novel in Italy with emphasis on modern historical novels. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
WOMS 324C - Successful completion
ITAL 330 Literary Genres
3.00 credits
A study of examples of the major literary genres (narrative, dramatic, and poetic). In Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 350 Ital Civilization and Culture
3.00 credits
Readings and discussion of various aspects of Italian life such as art, cinema, politics, literature, history, fashions, etc. In Italian.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 363 The Roman Republic
3.00 credits
In English. The political, social and cultural history of Republican Rome from its legendary origins to the Battle of Actium and its de facto end in 31 BC. The course will focus closely on the factors leading to the Republic’s successful rise as uncontested Mediterranean ruler as well as the internal political and social conflicts that brought the Republic crashing down to its ultimate fall.
Equivalent:
HIST 305 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
ITAL 364 The Roman Empire
3.00 credits
In English. The political, social and cultural history of Rome during the age of the Emperors, from Augustus' creation of the principate in 27 B.C. to the decline of the Roman Empire in the west by the 5th century AD. Special focus in this course will be given to the workings of the Imperial system, daily life in Rome and the provinces, the rise of Christianity, and the ultimate transformation of the empire.
Equivalent:
HIST 306 - OK if taken since Spring 2007
ITAL 366 Medieval Europe
3.00 credits
In English. Developments in the first flowering of western European civilization, C.A.D. 500-1350, including feudalism, the rise of representative assemblies, the commercial revolution and the papal monarchy. Taught only in Florence.
Equivalent:
HIST 311 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
ITAL 367 Renaissance Europe
3.00 credits
In English. The history of western Europe 1350-1550, emphasizing the political, religious, social, and economic context for the cultural achievements of the humanists, artists, dramatists, scientists, architects, and educators of the age of Joan of Arc, Michelangelo, and the Tudors and the Medici.
Equivalent:
HIST 312 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
ITAL 380 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Selected topics in Italian language, literature, or civilization.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 202 Minimum Grade: D
ITAL 390 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
ITAL 391 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
ITAL 440 Women in Italian Literature
3.00 credits
In English. This course examines the contribution of women novelists to Italian literature through the discussion of contemporary novels by women. Special arrangements may be made for majors in Italian Studies and minors in Italian.
ITAL 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
The internship provides students with the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills gained in the Italian classroom with a supervised organizational setting directly related to the student's major area of study. An internship plan (description, objectives, learning outcomes) is devised with an Italian faculty member, and approved by the Italian Studies director, before the internship begins.
Prerequisite:
ITAL 301 Minimum Grade: B or ITAL 302 Minimum Grade: B
ITAL 498 Senior Project
1.00 credit
Required of all Italian Studies majors. Permission from the Italian Studies director only.
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.