Biology

Chairperson: Kirk Anders

Professors: K. Anders, J. Beckstead, M. Bertagnolli, D. Boose, W. Ettinger, H. Lefcort, P. Pauw, N. Staub, B. Swanson, R. Prusch (Emeritus)
Associate Professors: E. Addis, B. Bancroft, G. Chang, J. Haydock, M. Poxleitner
Assistant Professors: C. Andrade, C. Bonilla, S. Hayes
Lecturer: K. Measor

Biology is the study of living organisms and the environment in which they live. As such, the Biology Department emphasizes a broad education within the field to help students develop a comprehensive understanding of how life works. To prepare students to pursue biology-oriented careers, in fields such as medicine, dentistry, biotechnology, conservation science, environmental science, sustainability, research and teaching, the Biology Department offers a selection of courses and experiences that help students understand the unity, diversity and complexity of life using evolutionary principles as the unifying theme. Students in the biology program are first introduced to foundational themes and concepts and then pursue their area of interest through elective courses. In general, our elective courses fall into the main categories of comparative physiology, genetics, cell and molecular biology, and ecology. Students are free to explore their interests in any or all of these areas. Through inquiry-based laboratory experiences and opportunities to participate in research projects, Biology majors also acquire problem solving and critical thinking skills and are therefore well prepared for their next step whether it be graduate or professional programs, specific training in health care fields, work in a lab or field station, or combining their scientific training with another interest such as business, law or even the arts. 

Biology majors can choose a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. The B.S. in Biology provides excellent preparation for students pursuing continued training in graduate programs in a broad range of sub-disciplines, as well as medical, dental, and veterinary school. The B.A. in Biology allows more time for students to get a second major or take additional courses in other departments at the university, thus gaining a broader liberal arts education. For example, Biology majors who want to teach biology at the secondary level can participate in the teacher certification program. Many of our majors and students who minor in Biology are interested in opportunities to integrate biological principles with other fields, such as those that focus on the environment and sustainability, law, engineering, business, or scientific journalism. We encourage interdisciplinary studies and work closely with other departments at the university to develop and promote these kinds of opportunities for our students.

The Research Concentration within the Biology major is designed for students who want to explore graduate level training in science. Biology faculty members are committed to mentoring undergraduate students in their research labs and also support Gonzaga students who are interested in doing summer research at other institutions.

Biology majors from Gonzaga University are well prepared for a variety of careers or post-graduate education.  Some go on to medical or dental school—recently our graduates have been accepted to Colorado State University, Creighton University, Georgetown University, Marquette University, Oregon Health & Science University, Tulane University, University of Colorado, University of Hawaii, and University of Washington, to name a few. Many of our graduates go on to graduate school—students have been accepted into programs at schools such as the University of California at Berkeley, Yale University, University of California at San Francisco, University of California at Irvine, Oregon State University, University of New Mexico, and University of Wisconsin–Madison, to name a few.  Many of our students choose to participate in the Peace Corps or the Jesuit Volunteer Corps prior to pursing post-graduate education.  Others work in biotech or nature conservation fields after graduation, or earn their teaching credentials and work to make the world a more scientifically literate place.

Science impacts everyone in our society. To help promote an understanding of the nature of science and issues that affect us all, the department offers courses that specifically fulfill the Scientific Inquiry requirement of the University Core curriculum: Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104 and 104L), Biological Systems (BIOL 199 and BIOL 199L), and Field Studies in Biodiversity (BIOL 159L, taught each summer in either Zambia or Ecuador).

B.S. Major in Biology: 64 credits

Lower Division
BIOL 105, BIOL 105L Information Flow in Biological Systems 4 credits
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biological Systems 3 credits
BIOL 205, BIOL 205L Physiology and Biodiversity 4 credits
BIOL 206, BIOL 206L Ecology 4 credits
BIOL 207, BIOL 207L Genetics 4 credits
PHYS 101, PHYS 101L (or PHYS 103, PHYS 103L) 5 credits
PHYS 102, PHYS 102L (or PHYS 204, PHYS 204L) 5 credits
CHEM 101, CHEM 101L General Chemistry 4 credits
CHEM 230, CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I 5 credits
CHEM 231, CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry II 4 credits
CHEM 245, CHEM 245L Biochemistry 4 credits
Upper Division*
BIOL 399 Advanced Topics 2 credits
BIOL Upper Division Electives 15 credits
BIOL 495 Senior Evaluation 0 credits
BIOL 499 Senior Colloquium 1 credit

B.A. Major in Biology: 40 credits

Lower Division
BIOL 105, BIOL 105L Information Flow in Biological Systems 4 credits
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biological Systems 3 credits
BIOL 205, BIOL 205L Physiology and Biodiversity 4 credits
BIOL 206, BIOL 206L Ecology 4 credits
BIOL 207, BIOL 207L Genetics 4 credits
CHEM 101, CHEM 101L General Chemistry 4 credits
CHEM 230, CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I 5 credits
Upper Division*
BIOL 399 Advanced. Topics 2 credits
BIOL Upper Division Electives 9 credits
BIOL 495 Senior Evaluation 0 credits
BIOL 499 Senior Colloquium 1 credit

Minor in Biology: 28 credits

Lower Division
BIOL 105, BIOL 105L Information Flow in Biological Systems 4 credits
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biological Systems 3 credits
BIOL 205, BIOL 205L Physiology and Biodiversity 4 credits
BIOL 206, BIOL 206L Ecology 4 credits
BIOL 207, BIOL 207L Genetics 4 credits
One of the following two:
4 credits 
CHEM 101/CHEM 101L General Chemistry

ENVS 104/ENVS 104L Environmental Chemistry
 
Upper Division*
BIOL Upper Division Electives 5 credits

* A pre-requisite for BIOL 205, 206 and 207 is a C- grade or better in BIOL 105, BIOL 105L and BIOL 106. Students must also get a C- grade or better in BIOL 205, 206, 207 and 399 in order to take BIOL 499. For upper division biology electives, a minimum of 10 credits (BS), 6 credits (BA), or 4 credits (Minor) must be biology courses taken from Gonzaga faculty: students participating in School for Field Studies programs or other study abroad programs should make note. Credits from BIOL 497, Biology Internship, do not satisfy any requirements for the Biology Major or minor. When the number of transfer credits does not match that listed above for a required course, such as PHYS 101, a student may petition the Chair of Biology to waive the additional required credit for that course.

All courses should be chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor.

B.S. or B.A. in Biology with Research Concentration

The Research Concentration is a challenging track within the Biology major. Its goals are to make research experiences available to more students, to show students the value of science education outreach through experiential learning, and to provide students with a more solid foundation in biological mathematics and science communication. It consists of a number of courses and experiences designed to prepare students to pursue research in some venue (graduate school, industry, government, medical school, or science education) after graduation. Students can enter the program at any time, although we anticipate most students will enter the program as sophomores and juniors.

To complete the Research Concentration, the following requirements are added to the requirements for the B.S. or B.A. degree in biology:

  1. Participate in a significant research experience. This means working on an independent research project for the equivalent of 4 credits.  Most students can fulfill this requirement in one summer of full-time research or four academic semesters of research while enrolled in other classes.  Enrolling in the Research Concentration does not guarantee a research experience.  It is the student’s responsibility to secure a research position.  This requirement can be fulfilled in the lab of a GU faculty member or with prior permission, at a different institution. 
  2. Present the results from the independent research (in oral or poster format) to the scientific community at a venue outside of the Gonzaga campus.
  3. Write up the research results under advisement with your research mentor. Final papers will be turned in to the Research Coordinator the last month of the final semester you are enrolled at Gonzaga. If you did research off campus, see the Research Coordinator to arrange a local writing mentor.
  4. Participate in science education outreach for 16 hours one semester (BIOL 295/CHEM 295).
  5. Take BIOL 484 Research Seminar (1 credit) and attend a minimum of 12 biology-related seminars (including those in BIOL 484), and write and submit a seminar reflection for each seminar.
  6. Take a college calculus course, Survey of Calculus (MATH 148) or Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (MATH 157).
  7. Complete a statistics course (MATH 121 or MATH 321) or biological mathematics course (BIOL 305).
Lower Division
BIOL 100 Biological Concepts:
3.00 credits
A one-semester course designed to investigate the process of science by focusing on current biological issues. Different subfields of biology will be explored depending on the instructor. This course does not have a laboratory and does NOT meet the Scientific Inquiry requirement of the University Core. Designed for non-science majors. Fall.
BIOL 104 Scientific Inquiry
2.00 credits
This lecture and laboratory course content will be determined by the instructor to meet the learning objectives of the Scientific Inquiry requirement of the University Core. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
BIOL 104L
BIOL 104L Scientific Inquiry Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 104.
Concurrent:
BIOL 104
BIOL 105 Info Flow in Biol Systems
3.00 credits
This course provides a foundation in the principles of biology by examining the fundamental role of information in generating the properties of life. The course explores the molecular basis of biological information (codes, signals, structures) and its role in growth, development, communication, regulation, reproduction and evolution of living things. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
BIOL 105L
BIOL 105L Info Flow in Biol Systems Lab
1.00 credit
Designed to provide students with an authentic scientific discovery experience, this laboratory involves the isolation, identification, and characterization of novel bacteriophages from local soil samples. Students learn how to approach scientific questions, make observations, record, analyze and report data. Taken concurrently with BIOL 105.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 105 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biol Systems
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the biological processes of energy acquisition, how energy is used in biological systems, and how energy is transferred between organisms and through ecosystems. Human impacts to energy transfer will be covered and topics will integrate energy concepts from cells to organisms to ecosystems. There is no laboratory associated with this course. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 105 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 105L Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 101L Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 101L Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 123 Human Ecology
2.00 credits
A study of the principles of ecology (including population dynamics, diversity, and energy flow) and the impact humans have on the environment. Lab is required. Designed for non-science majors who need a lab science. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
BIOL 123L
BIOL 123L Human Ecology Laboratory
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 123.
Concurrent:
BIOL 123
BIOL 159 Studies in Biodiversity
1.00 credit
This course is a continuation of BIOL 159L Field Studies in Biodiversity. Research projects initiated in the field in BIOL 159L will be concluded with further library research, completion of a technical or popular press article, drafting and editing a poster, and a presentation at a local or regional event. Fall semester, Prerequisite: BIOL 159L.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 159L Minimum Grade: D
BIOL 159L Field Studies in Biodiversity
3.00 credits
This course uses a field experience as a backdrop to learn about evolutionary, ecological and biogeographical processes that determine the ranges and biodiversity of organisms. The course begins with class work on the Gonzaga campus and is followed by 3-4 weeks in the field, where Gonzaga faculty and local experts will mentor students. Field locations vary by year and include Ecuador, Belize, Zambia, Costa Rica, or domestic locations. This course is designed for non-science majors and meets the Scientific Inquiry requirement of the University Core. The class meets together with the students enrolled in BIOL 359L for biology majors. Summer.
BIOL 170 Introduction to Microbiology
3.00 credits
An introduction to microbiology for students in Nursing or other allied health professions who will not be majoring in Biology. The course includes basic cellular chemistry and genetics, as well as a survey of topics of clinical importance. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
(BIOL 105 Minimum Grade: C- or TRAN GBIO Minimum Grade: T) and BIOL 105L Minimum Grade: C- and (CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: C- or TRAN GCHM Minimum Grade: T)
Concurrent:
BIOL 170L
BIOL 170L Intro to Microbiology Lab
1.00 credit
An introduction to methods of microbial analysis including the culture, safe handling, and genetic analysis of microbes. Taken concurrently with BIOL 170.
Concurrent:
BIOL 170
BIOL 181 Biological Systems
2.00 credits
This course provides an exploration of the basic systems in biology from plants to animals and from cells to ecosystems for non-science majors. Additionally, this course provides elementary teacher candidates with the basic content knowledge needed to teach life science at the elementary school level. This course is designated as a Scientific Inquiry lab course and the lab is required. Fall only. Taken concurrently with BIOL 181L.
Concurrent:
BIOL 181L
BIOL 181L Biological Systems Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 181.
Concurrent:
BIOL 181
BIOL 190 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
BIOL 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
BIOL 199 Investigations in Biology
2.00 credits
Designed for non-science majors; this fulfills the core Scientific Inquiry requirement. Lectures and laboratory sessions emphasize science as an inquiry based process. Selected topics will be offered each semester. Laboratory is required when offered. Fall.
Concurrent:
BIOL 199L
BIOL 199L Investigations in Biology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 199.
Concurrent:
BIOL 199
BIOL 205 Physiology & Biodiversity
3.00 credits
This course focuses on understanding the diversity of life on earth and the physiological mechanisms that allow organisms to live in a wide array of environments. A framework of physiology is used to compare and contrast clades of organisms. A pre-requisite (or co-requisite) for most upper division biology elective courses. Fall.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 105 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 205L
BIOL 205L Physiology & Biodiversity Lab
1.00 credit
Students are introduced to the diversity of organisms and physiological processes that allow organisms to live in a wide array of environments. Taken concurrently with BIOL 205.
Concurrent:
BIOL 205
BIOL 206 Ecology
3.00 credits
This course examines the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that determine the distribution and abundance of species. Students will explore interactions between organisms and their environments at levels from individuals through ecosystems. A pre-requisite (or co-requisite) for most upper division biology elective courses, and a pre-requisite for BIOL 499. Must be taken Sophomore or Junior year, and cannot be taken Senior year. Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 105 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 206L
BIOL 206L Ecology Lab
1.00 credit
Field and laboratory experiments are used to investigate ecological mechanisms that determine the distribution and abundance of species. Taken concurrently with BIOL 206.
Concurrent:
BIOL 206
BIOL 207 Genetics
3.00 credits
This course promotes an understanding of genes and genomes – their molecular properties, how they are expressed and regulated, how they contribute to inheritance, and how they are shaped by evolutionary forces. A pre-requisite (or co-requisite) for most upper division biology elective courses. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 105L Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 207L
BIOL 207L Genetics Lab
1.00 credit
This course provides students with hands-on experimental investigations of molecular mechanisms in genetics. Taken concurrently with BIOL 207.
Concurrent:
BIOL 207
BIOL 290 Directed Readings
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
BIOL 295 Science Outreach
.00 credits
The Biology and Chemistry/Biochemistry departments run a variety of outreach programs that include class visits, field trip tours, special summer programs and more. All of our programs strive to engage participants with opportunities for hands-on scientific discovery and inspiration. Fall and Spring.
Upper Division
BIOL 301L Cell Techniques Lab
2.00 credits
This course is designed to be an intensive introduction to methods of analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure, composition, and behavior. Microscopy (compound and fluorescence), protein studies, enzyme kinetics, bacterial growth, cell signaling, and development are just some of the areas of research students will be exposed to. This course will also be scientific writing and reading intensive, developing student expertise in these critical areas in the field of biological research. Offered on sufficient demand.
BIOL 303 Population Ecology
3.00 credits
An in-depth look at the interactions that control the distribution and abundance of organisms at the population level. Topics such as life-history strategies, population dynamics, competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism will be explored through the research literature, and quantitative approaches. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 303L Population Ecology Laboratory
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 303 when the laboratory is offered.
Concurrent:
BIOL 303
BIOL 304 Practice in Laboratory Teachng
1.00 credit
Students gain teaching experience by assisting laboratory instructors as a teaching assistant (TA) in a laboratory course. Duties may include laboratory set-up, in-class mentoring, grading, and quiz preparation. May be repeated. A maximum of two credits may be applied to Biology electives. Usually limited to students who have earned an A or B in the lecture portion of the course for which the student is a candidate to TA the laboratory. By permission only. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 305 Biological Data Analysis
4.00 credits
An applied study of statistical methods used to investigate biological questions. Emphasis will be on applications using software to investigate biological data sets generated by student and instructor research. The course will survey descriptive statistics, sampling, experimental design, estimation, hypothesis testing, and model building (e.g. analysis of variance, regression, multivariate). This course does not fulfill the University Core Math requirement. Note that BIOL 206 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course. Spring, odd years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 313 Animal Behavior
3.00 credits
This course explores how behavioral processes affect ecological patterns. The behavioral adaptations of animals to their environment including the evolution of behavior, foraging, competition for resources, reproductive ecology, mating systems, parental care, and cooperative behavior. Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 313L Animal Behavior Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 313 when the laboratory is offered.
Concurrent:
BIOL 313
BIOL 323 Conservation Biology
3.00 credits
This course covers the biological concepts important for the conservation of natural populations, communities, and ecosystems. Both theoretical and empirical studies will be applied to such topics as: the genetics and ecology of small populations, consequences of habitat fragmentation, the impact of introduced species, and the ecological value of biological diversity. Counts as upper division elective for both Biology and Environmental Studies. Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and (BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
Equivalent:
ENVS 303 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
BIOL 323L Conservation Biology Lab
1.00 credit
This labratory includes field trips. Taken concurrently with BIOL 323.
Concurrent:
BIOL 323
Equivalent:
ENVS 303L - OK if taken since Fall 2017
BIOL 330 Invertebrate Biology
4.00 credits
An examination of the major invertebrate phyla, including an overview of the structural and functional characteristics of each group. The evolutionary relationships between various invertebrate groups will also be examined. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction of marine species with their environment. Taught in a combined lecture/laboratory format. Offered on sufficient demand. Note that BIOL 206 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: D
BIOL 331 Parasitology
3.00 credits
Explores the medical, physiological, ecological, and historical effects of parasites. The course concentrates on human parasites and ranges from viruses and bacteria through helminthes and arthropods. Fall.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 331L Parasitology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 331 when laboratory is offered.
Concurrent:
BIOL 331
BIOL 333 Community Ecology
3.00 credits
This course explores in detail the major processes that have created and are operating within communities, including species diversity, competition, predation, herbivory, island biogeography, and succession. Students will explore the theories and experimental evidence of these processes and conduct ecology projects. Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 334 Advanced Evolution
3.00 credits
An in-depth study of the mechanisms responsible for the diversity of life on earth. Topics covered include speciation, adaptation, systematics, extinction, natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and gene flow. Examples are chosen from all types of organisms. This course may be repeated once as long as the content is different than the first occurrence of enrollment. Spring, odd years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 335 Advanced Genetics:
3.00 credits
An advanced study of genetics within the context of a selected topic in biology. Past topics have included an examination of human race and racism and the study of genomes. This course may be repeated once as long as the content is different than the first occurrence of enrollment. Note that BIOL 206 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course. Spring, even years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 335L Adv Genetics Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 335 when laboratory is offered.
Concurrent:
BIOL 335
BIOL 337 Developmental Biology
3.00 credits
A study of the principles and mechanisms that underlie the development of plants and animals, using approaches that integrate cell biology, genetics, molecular biology, and evolution. Note that BIOL 206 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course. Spring, odd years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 337L Developmental Biology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 337.
Concurrent:
BIOL 337
BIOL 338 Histology
3.00 credits
A study of the microscopic structure of animal (mostly mammalian) tissues and organs. Topics include: histology, cytology, and microscopic anatomy as exemplified in animal tissue. Material will emphasize the relationship between structure and function in tissues and organs. Fall.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 338L
BIOL 338L Histology Lab
1.00 credit
Labs will combine the study of tissue structure using a collection of prepared slides, and the processing and sectioning of tissue samples. Lab assignments will include the production of personal digital atlases. Taken concurrently with BIOL 338.
Concurrent:
BIOL 338
BIOL 340 Field Botany
3.00 credits
Course includes systematics of flowering plants, plant communities of the Inland Northwest, sight identification of major plant families and selected topics in plant ecology. A plant collection is required as well as a field project in the area of plant systematics or plant ecology. Two four-hour lectures/laboratory meetings per week and three, ten-hour field trips on Saturdays. Summer. Offered on sufficient demand.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 340L
BIOL 340L Field Botany Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 340.
Concurrent:
BIOL 340
BIOL 341 Human Physiology
3.00 credits
Examines the function of human physiological systems including: metabolic, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, muscular, and immunological. Systems are examined through case studies focused on human disease and human performance. Spring, odd years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 341L
BIOL 341L Human Physiology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 341. May require weekend field trips.
Concurrent:
BIOL 341
BIOL 343 Plant Community Ecology
3.00 credits
This class meets with and covers the same topics as BIOL 333 (Community Ecology), but is designed for biology majors who need a plant ecology-focused course. Students will explore the theories and experimental evidence of community ecology and conduct ecology projects with a specific focus on plant processes. Fall, odd years. Offered on sufficient demand.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 344 GIS & Ecological Techniques
3.00 credits
This course will introduce students to geographic information systems (GIS) and focus on how GIS can be used to address research and management questions in ecology. Student will use existing GIS databases from area resource agencies and learn how to create new GIS databases from field exercises. Field techniques will include vegetation sampling, small mammal trapping, amphibian/reptile monitoring, distance sampling, wildlife habitat assessment, and mapping exercises using compass and global position systems (GPS). Spring, even years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 344L
BIOL 344L GIS & Ecological TechniquesLab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 344.
Concurrent:
BIOL 344
BIOL 351 Advanced Cell Biology
3.00 credits
An advanced study of cell structure and function with an emphasis on selected topics in cell biology. Topics vary with instructor, but may include cell signaling, cell cycle, plant cells, and the cell biology of cancer. Note that BIOL 206 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course. Spring.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 351L Advanced Cell Biology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 351 when laboratory is offered.
Concurrent:
BIOL 351
BIOL 357 Princ of Wildlife Management
3.00 credits
The ecology, theory, methods, and philosophy of wildlife management emphasizing game, nongame, and endangered species. Students gain an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of various government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Counts as upper division elective for both Biology and Environmental Studies. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and (BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent:
BIOL 357L
Equivalent:
ENVS 323 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
BIOL 357L Wildlife Management Lab
1.00 credit
This laboratory includes field trips. Taken concurrently with BIOL 357.
Concurrent:
BIOL 357
Equivalent:
ENVS 323L - OK if taken since Fall 2017
BIOL 359 Studies in Biodiversity
1.00 credit
This course is a continuation of BIOL 359L Field Studies in Biodiversity. Research projects initiated in the field in BIOL 359L will be concluded with further library research, completion of a scientific article, and presentation of the research at a local or regional meeting. May be repeated for a total of two credits. Fall.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) and BIOL 359L Minimum Grade: D
BIOL 359L Field Studies in Biodiversity
3.00 credits
This course uses a field experience as a backdrop to learn about evolutionary, ecological and biogeographical processes that determine the ranges and biodiversity of organisms. The course begins with class work on the Gonzaga campus and is followed by 3-4 weeks in the field, where Gonzaga faculty and local experts will mentor students. Field locations vary by year and include Ecuador, Belize, Zambia, Costa Rica, or domestic locations. This course is designed for students majoring or minoring in biology. The class meets together with students enrolled in BIOL 159L for non-science majors. Students are required to enroll i·n BIOL 359, Studies in Biodiversity, the semester after enrolling in BIOL 359L. May be repeated for a total of six credits. Summer.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 360 Plant Biology
3.00 credits
This course acquaints students with the evolution, structure, development and functions of plant cells, tissues and organs. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 360L
BIOL 360L Plant Biology Lab
1.00 credit
This laboratory includes field trips. Taken concurrently with BIOL 360.
Concurrent:
BIOL 360
BIOL 367 Entomology
3.00 credits
This course introduces students to the scientific study of insects. Topics will include insect identification, diversity, behavior, anatomy, ecology, and applied entomology. Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 367L Entomology Lab
1.00 credit
This laboratory includes field trips. Taken concurrently with BIOL 367.
Concurrent:
BIOL 367
BIOL 370 Microbiology
3.00 credits
A study of the fundamental factors involved in microbiology including basic microbial morphology, taxonomy, biochemistry, genetics, and culture techniques. Fall.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 370L
BIOL 370L Microbiology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 370.
Concurrent:
BIOL 370
BIOL 371 Vertebrate Biology & Anatomy
3.00 credits
Vertebrate diversity, structure and function from an evolutionary perspective. Topics covered will include development, physiology, ecology, behavior and conservation. Note that BIOL 206 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course. Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent:
BIOL 371L
BIOL 371L Vertebrate Biol & Anatomy Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 371.
Concurrent:
BIOL 371
BIOL 374 Immunology
3.00 credits
An introduction to the cellular and molecular basis of the immune response. Topics will include structures and interactions of molecules in the immune system, generation of diversity in immune specificity, cellular immunology, and the basis of immunity and autoimmune diseases. Note that BIOL 206 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course. Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 374L Immunology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 374 when laboratory is offered.
Concurrent:
BIOL 374
BIOL 375 Virology
3.00 credits
Viral evolution, replication, virus-host interactions, epidemiology, and lateral gene transfer are covered. Note that BIOL 206 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course. Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 380 Special Topics:
.00- 6.00 credits
This course may be repeated as long as the content is different than other occurrences of enrollment. If course is not taught by a Gonzaga faculty member, a limited number of credits can be applied to Biology electives: 5 for BS, 3 for BA, 1 for minor. Study abroad and School for Field Studies courses are examples.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 390 Directed Reading
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
BIOL 395 Research Assistantship
.00 credits
Undergraduate research assistantships are opportunities for student to earn a stipend while performing independent research in the laboratory of a Biology or Chemistry & Biochemistry faculty member. By Department Chair permission only.
BIOL 399 Advanced Topic:
2.00 credits
An introduction to primary research literature on specific biological topics. Students will write a paper that has as its foundation primary literature. Students will utilize their oral communication skills to explain the background of a given biology topic and lead discussions of the primary literature. Topics will vary. Course should be taken Junior year and must be completed with a C- grade or better prior to taking BIOL 499. Pre-requisites vary depending on topic. Course can only be repeated with permission from the Biology Department Chair. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205L Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206L Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207L Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 403 Marine Biology
3.00 credits
Students will explore the biology of marine systems. Topics will include atmospheric and climate modeling, fluid dynamics, physiology, evolution of diversity, ecology, molecular biology, economics, and environmental science. Spring, even years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 403L
BIOL 403L Marine Biology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 403 when laboratory is offered.
Concurrent:
BIOL 403
BIOL 405L Advanced Phage Research Lab
1.00 credit
This course provides students with the opportunity to pursue research on bacterial viruses, or bacteriophages. Students will work independently or in small teams to address questions chosen collaboratively by the students and the instructor. The course is aimed at students who are interested in molecular biology or bioinformatics research and those seeking additional experience in a research setting. Interested students should contact the instructor prior to registration to plan a research proposal. This course may be taken up to four times with permission. Fall and Spring. Offered on sufficient demand.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 105L Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207L Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 420 Physiological Ecology
3.00 credits
This course will examine the interactions between organismal function and the physical environment. Topics include: physiological and evolutionary adaptations to extreme environments (high altitudes, deep oceans, and deserts), physiological determinants of patterns of diversity, limits to performance and environmental tolerance, and physiological responses to climate change. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite:
and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
BIOL 440 Biochemistry I
3.00 credits
Lectures on the structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids) with an emphasis on proteins and enzymology. The central metabolic pathways of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the citric acid cycle are discussed from a mechanistic, energetic, and regulatory viewpoint. Offered on sufficient demand.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: D and CHEM 205 Minimum Grade: D and CHEM 231 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D
BIOL 441 Advanced Physiology
3.00 credits
Physiological mechanisms, processes and responses of animals. Physical, chemical and biochemical principles common to physiological systems, such as respiration, excretion, and metabolism, will be covered. Goals of the course are to reveal the mechanisms, adaptive significance, and evolution of physiological systems using a comparative approach. This course may be repeated once as long as the content is different than the first occurrence of enrollment. Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 441L Advanced Physiology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 441 when laboratory is offered.
Concurrent:
BIOL 441
BIOL 443L Biochemistry Laboratory I
2.00 credits
An investigation of the techniques used to examine biomolecules and biochemical systems. Students perform integrated laboratory experiments in biochemistry. Offered on sufficient demand.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 440 Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D
BIOL 445 Biochemistry II
3.00 credits
Continuation of BIOL 440 (CHEM 440), including an examination of the primary processes of cellular energy production, oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis. The major metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides are covered. Offered on sufficient demand.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 440 Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D
BIOL 451 Comparative Endocrinology
3.00 credits
A comparative study of the structure and function of hormones across a wide variety of taxa (emphasizing vertebrates), including secretion and regulation of hormones, mechanisms of action, and integration of hormones into biological processes. Note that BIOL 206 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course. Spring, even years.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 451L
BIOL 451L Comparative Endocrinology Lab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 451 when laboratory is offered.
Concurrent:
BIOL 451
BIOL 456 Molecular Biology
3.00 credits
This course explores experimental strategies and techniques for discovering how genes function at the molecular level. The course integrates genetics and biochemistry focusing especially on the relationship between DNA, RNA and protein. Fall.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent:
BIOL 456L
BIOL 456L Molecular Biology Lab
1.00 credit
Labs focus on the construction, manipulation, and analysis of recombinant DNA molecules. Taken concurrently with BIOL 456.
Concurrent:
BIOL 456
BIOL 484 Research Seminar
1.00 credit
This class is designed to expose students to various areas of biology research and to the different communication forms of that research. Graduate school is a fundamental part of the biology research pathway and therefore this course will help students to become familiar with the graduate school process. The format of the class will include seminars and class meetings. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 490 Directed Reading
1.00- 4.00 credits
Reading material will be selected by the student after consultation with a faculty member in the department. Course may be repeated to total not more than six credits. A maximum of six credits of any combination of BIOL 390, BIOL 490, BIOL 496, and BIOL 498 can be applied to Biology electives. By permission only.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 495 Senior Evaluation
.00 credits
Required of all majors. Students will take the Major Field Test in Biology in their senior year. The test will be offered both fall and spring semesters. Students must score at or above the 20th percentile to pass the course. Fall and Spring.
BIOL 496 Biological Resch Techniques
1.00- 3.00 credits
An introduction to some of the experimental techniques used in biological research. Course content will vary by instructor. A maximum of six credits of any combination of BIOL 490, BIOL 496, and BIOL 498 can be applied to Biology electives. Offered on sufficient demand.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 497 Biology Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional work experience in a biology-related field. Students are responsible for arranging placement opportunities, and gaining approval from a supervising faculty member in the Biology department. This course does not satisfy any requirements for the Biology major or minor. Satisfactory /Unsatisfactory grading only.
BIOL 498 Undergraduate Research
.00- 6.00 credits
This course provides the motivated student with the opportunity to conduct an independent research project under the direction of a Biology Department faculty member. A maximum of six credits of any combination of BIOL 390, BIOL 490, BIOL 496, and BIOL 498 can be applied to Biology electives. Fall and Spring. Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 106 minimum grade: C-, BIOL 205 minimum grade: C-, BIOL 206 minimum grade: C-, BIOL 207 minimum grade: C-
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 499 Senior Colloquium
1.00 credit
Required of all majors. This course meets once per week to discuss biological issues relevant to society. Students must complete all 200-level major requirements and BIOL 399 with C- grades or better to take this senior level course. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 399 Minimum Grade: C-
 
Second Language Competency

Competency in a second language (classical or modern) at the intermediate level (courses numbered 201) is required for students continuing in the study of a language. Students beginning study in a language they have not previously studied can fulfill the requirement by completing one year at the beginning level (courses numbered 101-102). Non-native speakers of English who have completed the required English core credits at Gonzaga may petition the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences for a waiver of this requirement.

Additional information on this requirement can be found at

Language Requirement Information

 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.