Integrated Media

Chairperson: Susan English
Associate Professors: S. English, R. Lyons, S.J., C. McMahon
Assistant Professors: D. Gracon, M. McCormick
Senior Lecturers: J. Fitzsimmons, J. Kafentzis
Lecturer:
 J. Collett

The department offers three majors and three minors:

Bachelor of Arts, Broadcast and Electronic Media Studies major
Bachelor of Arts, Journalism major
Bachelor of Arts, Public Relations major
Minor in Broadcast and Electronic Media Studies
Minor in Journalim
Minor in Public Relations

Gonzaga’s Integrated Media Department weaves the related disciplines of Journalism, Broadcast and Electronic Media Studies and Public Relations into an environment where students can learn and hone their writing, interviewing, strategic communications and technological skills while specializing in a path that becomes a bridge to a career or to further scholarship in graduate school.

The Integrated Media Department offers majors and minors in Broadcast and Electronic Media Studies, Journalism and Public Relations within the College of Arts and Sciences. The department also offers an interdisciplinary Visual Literacy minor.

The Integrated Media programs strive to guide students toward academic excellence and tangible career goals. The curriculum reflects the Catholic, Jesuit character and liberal arts tradition of Gonzaga.

Students have many opportunities to develop and experiment with storytelling and strategic communication techniques using multiple platforms and methods, learning through the lens of social justice and Ignatian pedagogy.

The coursework in Integrated Media programs balances development of the skills and use of technology required of professionals with philosophical grounding in ethical and proficient communications.

In addition to coursework in traditional classroom settings, students engage in hands-on work in computer labs equipped with software applications that allow students to experience a contemporary news and video-editing environment.

Students further polish the tools of skillful and responsible communication through internships in professional environments, for which academic credit is available.

Campus media outlets that include GUTV and KAGU, Gonzaga’s television and radio stations, and The Gonzaga Bulletin (gonzagabulletin.com), the student newspaper, offer opportunities for students to hone media skills learned in the classroom. In addition, stories created for these media entities become substantial portfolio pieces for applications to graduate schools and for internships and employment.

Experiential learning in the broadcast, journalism and public relations arenas are hallmarks of the department.

Bachelor of Arts degrees are offered in these areas:

  1. Broadcast and Electronic Media Studies
  2. Journalism
  3. Public Relations
Integrated Media Department foundation course work:

Majors and minors within the Integrated Media Department are required to complete the Integrated Media foundation course work:
    INMD 101 Media Literacy        3 credits
    INMD 360 Media Law              3 credits
*Note: No upper-division courses except INMD 360 may be applied to two separate majors and/or minors within the Integrated Media Department without approval of the Department Chair.

Broadcast and Electronic Media Studies

Director: S. English

The Broadcast and Electronic Media Studies Program provides students with the worldview and skills necessary for creative and responsible work in the television and radio industries. Broadcasting majors and minors learn to emphasize work that makes a positive difference in their communities and the broader world.

To master their technical skills, students put on a series of live shows that air on GUTV. GUTV posts its broadcasts on its YouTube channel (youtube.com/user/gonzagatv15). Students engage in all aspects of the creation and production of these shows, including on-air roles, camera work, directing, mixing audio, using field cameras and non-linear editing.

Internships in broadcasting-centric workplaces allow students to transfer knowledge and experience acquired in classes to the professional world. Each semester, Spokane-area television and radio news organizations invite our students to work alongside professionals in a range of appropriate roles. University credits are available for internships.


B.A. Major in Broadcast and Electronic Media Studies: 36 Credits

Lower Division
INMD 101 Media Literacy 3 credits
BRCO 203 Fundamentals of Television Production 3 credits
BRCO 204 Fundamentals of Audio Production 3 credits
Upper Division
INMD 360 Media Law 3 credits
BRCO 303 Intermediate Television Production 3 credits
BRCO 370 Broadcast Journalism 3 credits
BRCO 469 Advanced Television Production and Programming 3 credits
BRCO 470 Broadcast Leadership 3 credits
BRCO 481 TV and Social Justice 3 credits
BRCO, JOUR or PRLS 300-400 Level Electives 9 credits
BRCO 499 Capstone 0 credits

Minor in Broadcast and Electronic Media Studies: 21 Credits

Lower Division
INMD 101 Media Literacy 3 credits
BRCO 203 Fundamental Television Production 3 credits
Upper Division
BRCO 303 Intermediate Television Production 3 credits
BRCO 304-BRCO 494 electives 12 credits

Journalism

Director: S. English

The Journalism Program cultivates students’ interests and techniques in gathering information through research and interviews, and writing for the array of media platforms. Emphasis is placed on the role and responsibilities of journalism within the context of civic and political participation, and the social justice awareness rooted in the University mission. Courses in journalism history, media law and ethics, and press theory form the philosophical foundation for the major and minor. Journalism students, in their work, focus on issues of civic and cultural importance with a traditional news stance, but there are ample opportunities for experimentation with the styles of journalism appropriate for magazines, publications with a literary bent, and emerging Internet-based platforms. Students also hone their visual storytelling skills in courses such as photojournalism and emerging media.

Students pursuing a major or minor in journalism choose from an array of elective courses, including literary journalism, news leadership, media ethics, entrepreneurial media, and sports writing.

Most Gonzaga journalism students work for the weekly student newspaper, The Gonzaga Bulletin (gonzagabulletin.com), as writers, editors or photographers. Credit toward the Journalism major and minor is available, as well as a stipend for editors, staff writers and photographers.

Many journalism students garner journalistic experience in the professional environment through internships, for which academic credit is also available.

B.A. Major in Journalism: 39 Credits

Lower Division
INMD 101 Media Literacy 3 credits
JOUR 110 Journalistic Writing 3 credits
JOUR 210 Civic Journalism 3 credits
JOUR 220 Student Media Writing Lab 1 credit
JOUR 230 Student Media Editing Lab 1 credit
JOUR 270 Photojournalism 3 credits
JOUR 280 Design and Editing 3 credits
Upper Division
INMD 360 Media Law 3 credits
JOUR 310 Public Affairs Reporting 3 credits
JOUR 350 History of Journalism 3 credits
JOUR 370 Emerging Media 3 credits
JOUR 440 Seminar: Media & Democracy 3 credits
JOUR 300-400 level electives 6 credits
JOUR 499 Capstone Project 1 credit

Minor in Journalism: 19 Credits

Lower Division
INMD 101 Media Literacy 3 credits
JOUR 110 Journalistic Writing 3 credits
JOUR 220 Student Media Writing Lab 1 credit
JOUR 270 Photojournalism 3 credits
Upper Division
JOUR 440 Seminar: Media & Democracy
3 credits
INMD, JOUR 300-400 Level Electives 6 credits

Public Relations

Director: S. English

The Public Relations Program combines study of communication theory, research techniques and corporate strategies and structures with journalistic expertise. Students learn to skillfully manage communication between organizations and the people they serve. Internships with local, national and international organizations provide hands-on experience in campaign planning, corporate communication, and nonprofit organization advocacy.

As part of the Public Relations coursework, students work directly with a local organization in creating a comprehensive public relations plan and media kit. As part of the senior capstone course, public relations students develop a portfolio, articulate a philosophical statement of communication, and write a thesis.

Public relations skills also enhance other degrees. Political Science students interested in honing their political campaigning skills, students in the humanities with interests in promoting and publicizing the arts, and business students seeking to complement marketing and management concentrations often complete a Public Relations minor.

B.A. Major in Public Relations: 39 credits

Lower Division
INMD 101 Media Literacy 3 credits
JOUR 110 Journalistic Writing 3 credits
PRLS 260 Public Relations Principles 3 credits
Upper Division
INMD 360 Media Law 3 credits
PRLS 310 Writing for Public Relations 3 credits
PRLS 340 Public Relations Speech Writing and Delivery 3 credits
PRLS 360 Strategic Communications 3 credits
PRLS 450 Organizational Issues 3 credits
PRLS 460 Public Relations Campaign 3 credits
PRLS 470 Public Relations Internship* 3 credits
PRLS 480 Public Relations Capstone 3 credits
BRCO, INMD, JOUR, PRLS 300-400 Level Electives 6 credits
PRLS 499 Thesis Conferencing 0 credits

*A 300-400 level, three-credit Integrated Media Department elective shall be substituted for an internship if the student does not meet a minimum cumulative 3.00 GPA prior taking the course.

Minor in Public Relations: 18 credits

Lower Division
INMD 101 Media Literacy 3 credits
JOUR 110 Journalistic Writing 3 credits
PRLS 260 Public Relations Principles 3 credits
Upper Division
PRLS 310 Writing for Public Relations 3 credits
PRLS 360 Strategic Communications 3 credits
BRCO, INMD, JOUR, or PRLS  300-400 Level Elective 3 credits
Lower Division
BRCO 203 Fundamentals of TV Production
3.00 credits
A practicum dealing with the technical aspects of television production along with creative generation of live, original programs. Students learn the basics of how television signals are created and transported, and then acquire proficiency in all crew areas concerned with live productions. In addition, this course provides a much greater sense of media literacy as it applies to mainstream messages in the visual media. Lab fee. Fall and Spring.
Equivalent:
SOSJ 260 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
BRCO 203L Fund of TV Production Lab
.00 credits
See BRCO 203 for course description.
Concurrent:
BRCO 203
Equivalent:
SOSJ 260L - OK if taken since Fall 2015
BRCO 204 Fund of Audio Production
3.00 credits
A practicum dealing with the technical aspects of radio management, programming, and production. Emphasis will be placed on the mastering of all operational procedures. Lab fee. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
BRCO 204L
BRCO 204L Fund of Audio Production Lab
.00 credits
See BRCO 204 for course description.
Concurrent:
BRCO 204
Upper Division
BRCO 303 Intermediate TV Production
3.00 credits
An application of the technical and aesthetic aspects of electronic news gathering and production. The class provides experience as camera operators, videotape editors, writers, and performers. Students are required to achieve a basic level of competency with digital cameras, and become proficient in non-linear editing techniques. Lab fee. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 203 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 303L Intermediate TV Production Lab
.00 credits
See BRCO 303 for course description.
Concurrent:
BRCO 303
BRCO 307 Writing with Sights & Sounds
3.00 credits
Students develop creative writing skills for telling stories with the languages of aural and visual media. Traditional media of radio and television are the foundations, but new forms of Internet communications will be studied. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
INMD 101 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 320 Image Communication
3.00 credits
A study of the fundamental elements of image communication and examination of contemporary image expression as found in film, television, and print. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
INMD 101 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 370 Broadcast Journalism
3.00 credits
Planning, reporting, and practice in gathering information and covering news for radio and television. May include depth reporting and documentaries. Fall.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 303 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 390 Directed Study
1.00- 6.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
BRCO 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
BRCO 450 Advanced Audio Production
3.00 credits
Organization, preparation, production of audio for a variety of media. Study of recording, mixing and editing of audio elements.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 204 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
BRCO 450L
BRCO 450L Advanced Audio Production Lab
.00 credits
See BRCO 450 for course description.
Concurrent:
BRCO 450
BRCO 469 Adv TV Production & Program
3.00 credits
Organization, preparation, and production of programs for telecast. Students generate a variety of live-streamed shows, a talk show, and a comedy show, and are responsible for all aspects of each production. Lab fee. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 303 Minimum Grade: D and BRCO 370 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 469L Adv TV Prod & Program Lab
.00 credits
See BRCO 469 for course description.
Concurrent:
BRCO 469
BRCO 470 Broadcast Leadership
3.00 credits
Students will be exposed to media leadership and management situations which deal with day-to-day decision-making, staffing, departmental structures, human resources, accountability, research and strategic planning. Fall.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 370 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 475 Advanced Producing
3.00 credits
Course topic to be determined by the instructor.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 469 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 481 TV & Social Justice
3.00 credits
Examines the application of this powerful medium toward improving the human condition. Students study examples of this concept in today's media, then use their own analytical and production skills to improve the condition locally. Spring.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 469 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 482 Remote Video Production
3.00 credits
Provides advanced experience in scripting, producing, directing, and editing televised field events. Examples include baseball games and theatre productions. Lab fee.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 203 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
BRCO 482L
BRCO 482L Remote Video Production Lab
.00 credits
See BRCO 482 for course description.
Concurrent:
BRCO 482
BRCO 483 Adv Non-Linear Editing
3.00 credits
Students are introduced to state-of-the-art digital editing and learn how the technology is utilized in the industry.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 303 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 484 Seminar in Live Television
3.00 credits
Allows students considering a career in live television to specialize in roles of anchor, reporter, producer or director. Lab fee.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 469 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
BRCO 484L
BRCO 484L Seminar Lab
.00 credits
See BRCO 484 for course description.
Concurrent:
BRCO 484
BRCO 485 Seminar in Broadcasting
3.00 credits
Students take on more challenging leadership roles in GUTV broadcasts and post-production by assuming the roles of executive producers and directors, and project coordinators. May be repeated for a total of not more than 6 credits. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 469 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 486 Applied Radio Production
3.00 credits
Students work with the latest audio production technologies to examine the current state of the radio industry and to participate in creation of radio programming on KAGU.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 204 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
BRCO 486L
BRCO 486L Applied Radio Lab
.00 credits
See BRCO 486 for course description.
Concurrent:
BRCO 486
BRCO 491 Directed Studies
.00- 6.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
BRCO 492 Independent Studies
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
BRCO 494 Special Project
1.00- 6.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
Prerequisite:
BRCO 303 Minimum Grade: D
BRCO 497 Broadcast Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Pre-professional experience in the environment of a commercial or public radio or television facility. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
BRCO 499 Capstone
.00 credits
Comprehensive evaluation of capstone project. Spring.
 
Lower Division
JOUR 110 Journalistic Writing
3.00 credits
An introduction to journalistic-style writing across media platforms, including broadcast journalism and public relations writing. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Equivalent:
SOSJ 160 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
JOUR 190 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
JOUR 210 Civic Journalism
3.00 credits
Emphasis on the style of journalism that fosters community engagement. Research, reporting and interviewing techniques that focus on news coverage of public organizations and groups that participate in framing public policy. A variety of writing styles will be utilized. Fall.
Prerequisite:
JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D or SOSJ 160 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
SOSJ 262 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
JOUR 220 Student Media Writing Lab
1.00 credit
With direction from student newspaper advisers/instructors and editors, students write stories and news reports for The Gonzaga Bulletin and gonzagabulletin.com. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D or SOSJ 160 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 230 Student Media Editing Lab
1.00 credit
With direction from advisers/instructors, students edit news stories for The Gonzaga Bulletin and gonzagabulletin.com. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D or SOSJ 160 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 270 Photojournalism
3.00 credits
An introduction to the technical, ethical, and creative principles of journalism-based photography and video. Topics include basic camera functions, digital image-editing tools, and the intersection of photojournalism, digital-video, and short documentary filmmaking. Special attention will be given to the professional and ethical considerations of the practice and the unique differences that separate photojournalism from other forms of image capturing. Lab fee. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
INMD 101 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
SOSJ 261 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
JOUR 280 Design and Editing
3.00 credits
Emphasis on design principles and editing skills for print and online journalistic platforms. Attention also to news values and philosophies. Spring.
Prerequisite:
JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D or SOSJ 160 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 290 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
Upper Division
JOUR 310 Public Affairs Reporting
3.00 credits
Reporting municipal, county, state, and federal affairs. Open meeting, shield and disclosure laws, law enforcement and the judicial process. Spring.
Prerequisite:
JOUR 210 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 350 History of Journalism
3.00 credits
The historical development of the press and journalistic practices in America. The focus is the development of journalistic values such as objectivity, accuracy, balance and legal and ethical issues such as free speech and access to public records. Spring.
Prerequisite:
INMD 101 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 370 Emerging Media
3.00 credits
Students integrate reporting and research with audio, video, photos and text to produce and design multimedia packages in a journalistic context. Students may utilize blogging, podcasting, social media and emerging media techniques. Some focus on analysis of the optimal platforms for presenting journalistic content. Spring.
Prerequisite:
JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D or SOSJ 160 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
SOSJ 367 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
JOUR 390 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
JOUR 410 Special Topics
3.00 credits
Course content focuses on emerging issues and topics that relate to journalistic practice and philosophy.
Prerequisite:
INMD 101 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 420 Literary Journalism
3.00 credits
The course focuses on writing longer forms of journalism. Content includes a look at the traditions of literary journalism in America, memoir-style nonfiction and using fiction techniques in nonfiction stories. Writing topics are individualized. Fall.
Prerequisite:
JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 301 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 302 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 303 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 306 Minimum Grade: D or SOSJ 160 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
JOUR 440 Seminar: Media & Democracy
3.00 credits
Examines the organizational, cultural, technological, and ideological nature of news. Attention is given to theories of the press, the construction of news, news as a form of knowledge, and the broader social implications of news organizations and practices. Spring.
Prerequisite:
INMD 101 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 470 Documentary Filmmaking
3.00 credits
Documentary filmmaking provides an environment in which students experiment with the combination of digital film aesthetics and documentary storytelling to produce an original short non-fiction work. The course includes examination of ethical issues in documentaries, the use of animation and interactivity in film and the role of documentary work in different cultures. Spring.
Prerequisite:
(VART 170 Minimum Grade: D or JOUR 170 Minimum Grade: D) or JOUR 270 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 485 Media Ethics
3.00 credits
Journalistic ethical issues ranging from fairness, balance and conflicts of interest to sensationalism will be discussed in depth. Overview of theories of leading historical and contemporary philosophers through the lens of relevance to contemporary media. Emphasis on use of ethical decision-making models.
Prerequisite:
INMD 101 Minimum Grade: D
JOUR 490 Directed Study-Special Project
1.00- 3.00 credits
Tutorial or a project proposed to faculty. Fall and Spring.
JOUR 494 Independent Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
In-depth pursuit of a topic proposed to faculty. Fall and Spring.
JOUR 497 Internships
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional work experience in journalism. Possibilities include print and online journalistic organizations and magazines. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Prerequisite:
INMD 101 Minimum Grade: D and (JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D or SOSJ 160 Minimum Grade: D)
JOUR 499 Capstone Project
1.00 credit
Students demonstrate command of journalistic practices and philosophies in a comprehensive project and essay exam. Spring.
 
Lower Division
PRLS 260 Public Relations Principles
3.00 credits
Theories and principles underlying public relations practice. The history and development of the field, responsibilities and duties, ethics, law, and social responsibility, and survey of practice and techniques. Fall and Spring.
Upper Division
PRLS 310 Writing for Public Relations
3.00 credits
Theory and models for communication in an array of forms common to PR including utilization of emerging technologies and an emphasis on understanding the target audience. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Prerequisite:
(ENGL 101 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 103H Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 200 Minimum Grade: D) and (JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D or SOSJ 160 Minimum Grade: D)
PRLS 340 PR Speech Writing & Delivery
3.00 credits
A focus on the variety of public address forms common to the public relations profession, including writing speeches for executives and public figures, and coaching for public and media appearances. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
PRLS 310 Minimum Grade: D
PRLS 360 Strategic Communications
3.00 credits
Strategic roles and theory-based planning concepts, integrated marketing communication, and analysis of case studies that review communication theory and professional practice. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
PRLS 260 Minimum Grade: D or PRLS 267 Minimum Grade: D
PRLS 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
PRLS 450 Organizational Issues for PR
3.00 credits
A study of the changing nature of the organizational public relations role, including contemporary theoretical models and expanding roles in communication, leadership, and organizational culture. Emphasis on consulting practices, leadership theory, strategies and corporate ethics. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
PRLS 260 Minimum Grade: D
PRLS 460 Public Relations Campaign
3.00 credits
Applied work for an actual client based on theories of organizational communication, including a campaign plan. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
PRLS 310 Minimum Grade: D or PRLS 305 Minimum Grade: D
PRLS 470 PR Internship Course
3.00 credits
Pre-professional work experience in public relations with a PR agency, non-profit or organization. 120-140 hours required with onsite supervision by a public relations practitioner. Instructor supports securing an internship and all internships are to be approved by the instructor prior to start date. Includes attendance at regular class sessions. Registration requires a minimum cumulative 3.0 G.P.A. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Prerequisite:
PRLS 310 Minimum Grade: D
PRLS 480 Public Relations Capstone
3.00 credits
This course involves the completion of a public relations thesis that integrates and applies prior course work and field work into academic research of contemporary issues in the public relations profession. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
PRLS 310 Minimum Grade: D or PRLS 305 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
PRLS 499
PRLS 490 Directed Study
.00- 3.00 credits
Individualized study of an issue related to the public relations profession. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Prerequisite:
PRLS 310 Minimum Grade: D
PRLS 497 Elective Internship
.00- 3.00 credits
Pre-professional work experience in public relations with a PR agency, non-profit or organization. All internships are to be approved by the instructor prior to start date. Virtual internships are allowed with instructor permission. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Prerequisite:
PRLS 310 Minimum Grade: D
PRLS 499 Thesis Conferencing
.00 credits
Individual thesis review sessions with PRLS 480 instructor. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
PRLS 480 Minimum Grade: D
 
Second Language Competency

Competency in a second language (classical or modern) at the intermediate level (courses numbered 201) is required for students continuing in the study of a language. Students beginning study in a language they have not previously studied can fulfill the requirement by completing one year at the beginning level (courses numbered 101-102). Non-native speakers of English who have completed the required English core credits at Gonzaga may petition the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences for a waiver of this requirement.

Additional information on this requirement can be found at

Language Requirement Information

 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.