Department of Special Education

Chairperson: Kimberly Weber

Master of Education in Special Education

Program Director: Anjali Barretto

The Department of Special Education offers preparation for special educators within schools and other agencies. Candidates gain core competencies and then specialize in areas of interest. Individual field experiences are available to meet specialized needs. Three tracks of study are offered: Track One in Functional Analysis, Track Two in Early Childhood Special Education, and Track Three in General Special Education (usually completed for candidates who have an endorsement in another area and are seeking to add an endorsement in special education). The Department of Special Education offers teaching endorsements in Special Education (pre-school-12) and Early Childhood Special Education (birth-3). After successfully completing nine credits of the program with a 3.00 GPA or higher in each course, candidates submit an application for candidacy.

Admissions

Each applicant must submit the following materials to the School of Education Graduate Admissions Office:

  1. A completed application form (see the School of Education website: http://www.gonzaga.edu/soe/grad) and non-refundable fee.
  2. A written statement of purpose addressing the applicant’s interest in graduate studies that relates to one or more areas in the field, assessing the applicant’s current strengths, and describing what the applicant hopes to gain from a master’s degree program. Please see the website for specific content to be addressed in the written statement.
  3. Two letters of recommendation sent directly from the recommending persons to the School of Education Graduate Admissions Office using the Confidential Recommendation form (see the School of Education website). Letters of recommendation must submitted by someone (a non- relative) who can attest to the applicants work performance.
  4. A resume. The resume should provide a total number of hours including the time period along with a short description of work experience with individuals with special needs.
  5. An official transcript from each college or university attended (international applicants must submit foreign transcripts in the original language and an English copy), final transcripts must bear a posted bachelor's degree.Only degrees and courses from a regionally accredited institution will be accepted.
  6. The official score from the Graduate Records Exam (GRE) general aptitude test or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) (must be less than five years old) or applicant may submit total a number of hours spent working with individuals with special needs. Those who do not submit GRE scores will automatically be evaluated based on experience working with individuals with special needs as provided in their resume and written statement. The GRE requirement may be waived if the applicant has an advanced degree.
  7. An interview with the special education faculty.

International students

  1. Submission of an official TOEFL score of 88ibt. 580 (written) or an IELTS score of 6.5 or higher.Completion of Gonzaga University’s ESL program will also satisfy the language requirement.
  2. A copy of the applicant’s passport.
  3. Completed financial declaration form with original supporting bank documents or official letter from sponsoring agency.

Prerequisite

A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university is required.

Program Outline: 32 credits

Core: 18-20 credits
EDSE 520 Applied Behavior Analysis 3 credits
EDSE 545 Special Education Policies and Procedures 3 credits
EDSE 575 Advanced Classroom Management 3 credits
EDSE 604 Assessment in Special Education 3 credits
EDSE 689 Professional Seminar 3 credits
EDSE 698 Research in Special Education 3 or 5 credits
(Three (3) credits for Track One and five (5) credits for Tracks Two and Three)
EDSE 699 Oral Comprehensive Examination 0 credit

 

One of the three following tracks:

Functional Analysis Concentration: 14-17 credits

EDSE 670 Advanced Seminar in Functional Analysis 3 credits
EDSE 671 Behavioral Treatment in Clinical Settings 4 credits
EDSE 672 Behavior Interventions in Natural Settings 4 credits
EDSE 673 Supervision and Consultation 3 credits
For those seeking BCBA certification the following additional courses must be taken to meet course content requirements.
EDSE 669 Ethics on Behavior Analysis I
1 credit
EDSE 674 Ethics on Behavior Analysis II
2 credits

Early Childhood Special Education Concentration: 12 credits

EDSE 560 Early Childhood Special Education 3 credits
EDSE 561 Physical Development 3 credits
EDSE 562 Language and Communication 3 credits
EDSE 565 Development of Children with Exceptionalities 3 credits

General Special Education Concentration: 12 credits

EDSE 501 Psychology of Children with Exceptionalities 3 credits
EDSE 522 Precision Teaching 3 credits
EDSE 551 Direct Instruction: Reading 3 credits
EDSE 552 Direct Instruction: Mathematics 3 credits

Students wishing to add an endorsement in Special Education must already be certified in a different endorsement area in the State of WA and take the following courses:

EDSE 520 Applied Behavior Analysis 3 credits
EDSE 545 Special Education Policies and Procedures 3 credits
EDSE 575 Advanced Classroom Management 3 credits
EDSE 604 Assessment in Special Education 3 credits
All track three courses: 12 credits
EDSE 505 Special Education Applied Classroom Experience: Elementary 1 credit
EDSE 506 Special Education Applied Classroom Experience 1 credit
EDSE 507 Special Education Applied Classroom Experience: Secondary 1 credit
One of the following early childhood special education courses: 3 credits
EDSE 560 Early Childhood Special Education
EDSE 561 Physical Development
EDSE 562 Language and Communication
EDSE 565 Development of Children with Exceptionalities

EDSE 696 Student Teaching in Special Education:  (A minimum of 9 weeks of full time teaching is required.  This is a full term course.)
6 credits 

Certification

Certification requirements for the State of Washington frequently change. It is the applicant’s responsibility to contact the Certification Director in the School of Education for the most current information regarding State certification.

Additional requirements include:

  1. Must hold a valid WA State Teaching Certificate. (Certificate must not be expired.)
  2. Must have a current eCertification Account.
  3. Must take the West-E in Special Education prior to student teaching.
  4. Must receive a C or better in all courses required for certification.

Electives

If a student previously took the equivalent of a core course or a course from the chosen track, then an elective course from the following special education courses may be substituted with the approval of the academic advisor, chairperson, and the dean.

EDSE 501 Psych of Child w/ Exception
3.00 credits
The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with an overview of special education. Etiology, characteristics, and treatment of major disabling conditions will be covered. Philosophical, political, and pedagogical implications of past, current, and future services are analyzed.
EDSE 505 Special Ed App Clssrm Exp Elem
1.00 credit
Graduate candidates obtain experience in applied special education classroom settings at the elementary/preschool level. Appropriate clearance is required prior to entering the school setting. A minimum of 30 hours of supervised work in school setting is required to meet course standards.
EDSE 506 SpEd Applied Classrom Exp
1.00 credit
Graduate candidates obtain experience in applied special education classroom settings either at the elementary/preschool level or at the middle/high school level. Opportunities to provide experiences in inclusive settings with special needs students will be sought. Appropriate clearance is required prior to entering the school setting. A minimum of 30 hours of supervised work in school setting is required to meet course standards.
EDSE 507 Spec Ed Applied Class Exp Seco
1.00 credit
Graduate candidates obtain experience in applied special education classroom settings at the middle/high school level. Appropriate clearance is required prior to entering the school setting. A minimum of 30 hours of supervised work in school setting is required to meet course standards.
EDSE 520 Applied Behavior Analysis
3.00 credits
An advanced introduction to the basic principles of learning and effective and practical procedures based upon those principles. Students read seminal articles in the field of behavior analysis and conduct and write up their own applied research study, implementing some of the procedures to remediate socially significant problems of children.
EDSE 522 Precision Teaching
3.00 credits
This course covers basic procedures of precision teaching (e.g., movement cycles, pinpointing behaviors, setting aims, charting, planning curricula development for precision teaching, and methods of remediating learning disabilities).
EDSE 523 Theory of Instruction
3.00 credits
This course covers a detailed analysis of direct instruction principles and their application to curriculum development. Requires an in-depth knowledge of and experience with direct instruction curriculum materials.
EDSE 535 Autism
3.00 credits
This course overviews the major characteristics of persons with autism, with focus on effective treatment, functional goals and curricula, objective assessment, teacher/parent training, classroom integration, and generalization and maintenance of treatment gains. Particular emphasis is placed on developing effective applied skills through course work, practicum, and an applied research study and write-up.
EDSE 545 Spec Ed Policies & Procedures
3.00 credits
This course covers issues involved in providing I.E.P. provisions including goals, strategies, and legal and ethical implications.
EDSE 551 Direct Instruction-Reading
3.00 credits
This course trains prospective teachers how to teach special education and regular education pupils to read. Content covers beginning through intermediate reading. Particular emphasis is placed on instructing teachers to use reading techniques that have research supporting their effectiveness. Prospective teachers are taught how to teach, monitor, assess, and remediate reading deficits regarding various reading skills.
EDSE 552 Direct Instruction-Mathematics
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the teaching of mathematics directly to students with special needs and regular education elementary pupils. Emphasis is placed on procedures with a strong research base supporting their effectiveness. Prospective teachers are taught how to teach, monitor, assess, and remediate skill deficits regarding various mathematical skills.
EDSE 560 Early Childhood Special Ed
3.00 credits
This course overviews of the principles and practical procedures involved in infant and preschool services integrating children with disabilities. Applied experience is provided in an integrated preschool setting.
EDSE 561 Physical Development
3.00 credits
This course examines the principles of normal physical and neuro-motor development with an emphasis on methods for identifying and treating delayed and dysfunctional development. Treatment approaches address designing interventions and adapting the environment. Applied experience is provided in an integrated preschool setting.
EDSE 562 Language and Communication
3.00 credits
This course examines the principles of normal language development as well as guidance for facilitating functional language development in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. The focus is on intervention programs designed for enhancing generalization of functional language usage. Applied experience is provided in an integrated preschool setting.
EDSE 565 Dev of Child w/ Exception
3.00 credits
This course emphasizes normal child development and etiology of exceptionalities from infancy through age six. History and philosophy of early childhood special education, as well as relevant legislation, are studied. Applied experience is provided in an integrated preschool setting.
EDSE 575 Adv Seminar in Classrm Mgmt
3.00 credits
This course examines strategies of applied behavior analysis for controlling various inappropriate behaviors that interfere with the learning process. The emphasis is on practical procedures that can be implemented by a single teacher in a special education or regular classroom setting.
Prerequisite:
EDSE 520 Minimum Grade: B- or EDSE 320 Minimum Grade: C
EDSE 576 Consultation in the Classroom
3.00 credits
This course covers advanced information and skills required to consult effectively with educators and parents regarding the development and implementation of educational programs within the least restrictive environment.
EDSE 577 Exam Yth w/ Behav Dis or ADHD
3.00 credits
This course overviews practical strategies to deal with children's behavioral and emotional disturbances in the classroom. Etiology of behavior disorders and emotional problems in children and youth are discussed.
EDSE 580 Tech for Tchg the Learng Disab
3.00 credits
This course examines various techniques and approaches to remediate learning disabilities in school settings. Emphasis is placed on successful treatment and diagnostic procedures.
EDSE 604 Assessment in Special Ed
3.00 credits
This course covers various methods of assessing student progress and social behaviors as well as actual classroom observations and assessment. Data gathered in assessment are used to develop an individualized program for special students.
EDSE 611 Continuing Research Education
1.00 credit
EDSE 669 Ethics on Behavior Analysis I
1.00 credit
This course was designed to provide students an understanding of the expectations of ethical behavior required by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). The course will cover content found in the “Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis.” Specific content areas included but are not limited to responsible conduct, responsibility to clients, assessing behavior, and individualized behavior change programs. This course will focus on client centered ethical responsibilities.
EDSE 670 Functional Analysis Seminar
3.00 credits
This course reviews functional analysis methodologies as developed by Iwata et. al (1982) for systematically identifying environmental variables that serve to maintain aberrant behavior. This course includes a detailed overview of functional analysis procedures and treatment packages that can be implemented based on the results of functional analysis. Particular emphasis is placed on reinforcement-based interventions and dimensions of reinforcement.
Prerequisite:
EDSE 520 Minimum Grade: B or EDSE 320 Minimum Grade: B
EDSE 671 Beh Treat in Clinic Set
4.00 credits
This course is experimental in nature and requires students to apply the functional analysis methodologies studied in EDSE 670 in a "hands on" manner. Under direct supervision of faculty, students will conduct weekly assessments to determine the environmental variables maintaining children's inappropriate behavior (EDSE 671L=1 credit). Students will also collect and graph data, write reports that summarize their findings, and meet regularly with faculty and classmates to discuss their findings and their relationship to the literature. Students will be required to use and discuss single case design in the evaluation of treatment components.
Prerequisite:
EDSE 670 Minimum Grade: B-
EDSE 672 Behav Int Nat Setting
4.00 credits
This course is experiential in nature and should be taken in the semester immediately following EDSE 671. Students in this course will implement behavioral interventions designed in the clinical settings. Students will also collect and graph data, write reports that summarize their findings, and meet regularly with faculty and classmates to discuss their findings and their relationship to the literature. Students will be required to use and discuss single case design in the evaluation of treatment components.
Prerequisite:
EDSE 671 Minimum Grade: B-
EDSE 673 Supervision and Consultation
3.00 credits
This course is experimental in nature. Students in this course provide supervision of functional analysis procedures to others wishing to learn about functional analysis procedures. Students consult with classroom teachers and others as they provide instruction on assessment methodologies and procedures, data collection, graphing, report writing, and intervention recommendations. Students meet regularly with faculty to discuss teaching, supervision, and consultation techniques and issues.
Prerequisite:
EDSE 672 Minimum Grade: B-
EDSE 674 Ethics on Behavior Analysis II
2.00 credits
This course was designed to provide students an understanding of the expectations of ethical behavior required by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). It is imperative that professionals conduct themselves in ways that highlight the highest ethical standards. This course will cover a portion of the content found in the “Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis.” Specific content areas included but are not limited to supervision, ethical responsibility to the profession, ethical responsibility to colleagues, public statements, research, and responsibility to BACB. This course will focus on the behavior analysis’ ethical responsibilities.
EDSE 675 Adv Applied Behavior Analysis
3.00 credits
The most recently developed and refined principles and data-based effective procedures developed within the field of Applied Behavior Analysis are discussed. This course promotes graduate students' analytic and practical skills in teaching and management procedures in a variety of settings. The course focuses on state-of-art advancements through recently published applied research studies and reviews.
EDSE 680 Best Practices
3.00 credits
This course provides students with the rationales and strategies for implementing intervention technologies for research-based educational best practices. Best practices include precision teaching, cooperative learning, direct instruction, self-management, class wide peer tutoring, and opportunities-to-respond.
EDSE 689 Professional Seminar
1.00- 3.00 credits
A culminating course where the student develops and conducts and writes an applied research study or completes and writes a comprehensive review of the literature. The formal write-up must be in APA style and format and ready for submission to a journal outlet.
EDSE 690 Directed Readings
1.00- 3.00 credits
This course is an individualized study based on readings approved by the professor. Each student develops a selected bibliography.
EDSE 691 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
This course is an individualized study that is designed by the professor. Students follow a prescribed course outline.
EDSE 692 Independent Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
This course is an individualized study that is designed by the student in consultation with the professor. Self-directed learning in a selected area of interest is the process employed. Professor serves as a resource.
EDSE 694 Special Project
1.00- 6.00 credits
This course is an individualized study that is project based. The study results in a practical application of educational theory. The project or written report of project is submitted to the professor for evaluation.
EDSE 696 Special Ed Teaching Practicum
6.00 credits
This is an intensive field experience which is at least eight weeks in duration. The graduate student will systematically take over the responsibilities of the special education teacher for at least three weeks under the direction of the University supervisor and the cooperating special education teacher.
Prerequisite:
EDSE 551 Minimum Grade: B- and EDSE 552 Minimum Grade: B- and EDSE 575 Minimum Grade: B-
EDSE 697 Ext Adv Spec Ed Teach Pract
6.00 credits
This is an intensive field experience which is at least 12 weeks in duration. The graduate student will systematically take over all the responsibilities of the special education teacher for at least five weeks under the direction of the University supervisor and the cooperating special education teacher.
Prerequisite:
EDSE 551 Minimum Grade: C and EDSE 552 Minimum Grade: C and EDSE 575 Minimum Grade: C
EDSE 698 Research in Special Education
3.00- 5.00 credits
This course presents the various procedures for carrying out classroom research by the teacher in order to evaluate the effectiveness of various classroom intervention strategies. The course teaches students ways to collect data, examine data for functional relationships, graph, and write up a research report in APA style.
EDSE 699 Comprehensive Oral Examination
.00 credits
This course requires the student to present orally and in a professional manner a summary of the major research project.
EDSE 900 Workshop
1.00- 6.00 credits
EDSE 901 Workshop
2.00 credits
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.