Department of Educational Leadership and Administration

Chairperson:  Cynthia S. Johnson, Ed.D.

The Department of Educational Leadership and Administration bases its graduate degree programs on the premise that the education profession must be composed of knowledgeable, skilled, and committed leaders who operate from a strong value base. At the master’s level, leadership is defined as possessing the knowledge, abilities, and commitment to facilitate transformation in educational settings.

This department offers a Master’s degree through four programs and one post master’s program:

Admissions to Master's programs

Selection of master's candidates is based on the information gathered from the materials identified below. Each applicant should submit the following materials to the School of Education Graduate Admissions Office:

  1. A completed application form (see the School of Education website: http://www.gonzaga.edu/soe/grad)
  2. A $50.00 non-refundable fee.
  3. A written statement of purpose. Gonzaga University belongs to a long and distinguished tradition of humanistic, Catholic, and Jesuit education. The School of Education upholds the University tradition and exemplifies it through its dedication to preparing socially responsive professionals who serve with competence, commitment, and care. Additionally, the department’s mission is to prepare reflective educational leaders who promote student, professional, and organizational learning to address challenges and opportunities inherent in a changing world. With these perspectives in mind, please submit a typed statement of purpose that:
    1. Briefly describes your background.
    2. Describes why you are interested in the Gonzaga graduate program.
    3. Describes and gives examples of the strengths that you bring to the program that will help you as an educational leader.
    4. Describes leadership experiences that you have had in or out of the school setting.
    5. Describes and gives examples of your personal commitment to working with students, service to others, and advocating for all students.
    6. Shares with us what you expect to accomplish in acquiring a master's degree and what you hope you will accomplish once you have received your degree.
    7. Professional Dispositions Please rate the candidate according to the scale five (5) strongly agree to one (1) strongly disagree. The last column on the rating sheet may be checked if you're feel you have “insufficient knowledge” of the candidate to make a judgment.
  4. Two letters of recommendation, from recent supervisors, sent directly from the recommending persons to the School of Education Graduate Admission Office with the Confidential Recommendation forms attached (see the School of Education website).
    1. Written Recommendation: Please write your letter of recommendation on school or district letterhead. It is crucial that you address all of the items; we score the candidate’s likelihood of success in graduate work and “fit” to our program against all of these criteria.
      1. Describe and give examples of the candidate’s ability to lead, or leadership experiences in the school setting.
      2. Describe and give examples of the candidate’s commitment to serving students.
      3. Describe and give examples of the candidate’s teaching ability.
      4. Describe and give examples of the candidate’s commitment to diversity and ability to advocate for the success of all students.
  5. One official transcript from each college or university attended. International applicants must submit foreign transcripts in the original language and an English copy. Final transcripts must bear a posted Bachelor’s degree. Only degrees and courses from a regionally accredited institution will be accepted.
  6. A résumé that shows career history and highlights leadership experiences. List and describe any specific training and / or experiences you have had as a group / project leader, co-coordinator of change initiatives, or trainer. Please include length of service. Applicants, please structure your vita as shown below and explicitly address each of the bulleted items:
    • Work Experience Describe your work history (most recent first), including location, length of service, and position
    • Professional Development/Training List career related training and professional development programs completed within the past four years. Include the source of training, and the duration and year completed.
    • Technology Training Briefly describe your level of training and experience in using information technology including computers, software, and telecommunications networks as tools for business, education, teaching, and personal use.
    • Volunteer/unpaid service List and describe and voluntary/unpaid post-secondary employment and/or community service experience. Please include name of organization, length of service, and a brief description of duties.
    • Leadership Experience Please describe any specific training and/or experiences you have had as a group/project leader, co-coordinator of change initiatives, or as a trainer.
  7. An official TOEFL score of at least 550 (minimum score of 80 if taken via Internet) by each international applicant who has graduated from a foreign college or university and whose native language is not English.

Prerequisite

A Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university is required and a minimum of three (3) years of teaching experience is preferred.

Master of Education in Educational Leadership - Washington State

The Master of Education in Educational Leadership Program is an integrated program for educators who aspire to be effective teacher leaders or administrative leaders. We believe that educational teams become stronger when greater understanding exists about the roles of each of its members. Because the program integrates content and professional standards appropriate to both teachers and administrators, candidates also may elect to complete their principal or program administrator certification in conjunction with the master’s program. Theory and practice are explored from the perspective of both teachers and administrators, and coursework is differentiated depending on the candidates’ career goals.

The program is designed for working educators with a focus on linking theory and research to practical issues in teaching and leadership using candidates' local districts as the context for their study. Candidates are admitted into a cohort of educators from their local areas and experience the benefits of a collaborative learning community. Faculty travel to the candidates’ location. Courses are held in the evenings or on weekends depending on the needs of the cohort. As candidates work on assignments for each of the program courses, they have the opportunity to explore issues important to them in their own classrooms, schools, and districts. Each cohort is assigned a faculty advisor who works with them through the entire program. Currently, the program is approved to be delivered in the State of Washington.

Master of Education in Educational Leadership - Alberta, Canada 

This program is currently unavailable. Please see instead the Master of Education in Educational Leadership - On-line Master's Degree Program.

Master of Education in Educational Leadership Program is an integrated program for educators who aspire to be effective educational leaders. The program is designed for working educators with a focus on linking theory and research to practical issues in leadership using candidate's local districts as the context for their study. Candidates are admitted into a cohort of educators from their local area and experience the benefits of a collaborative learning community. Faculty travel to the candidates' location. Courses are held in the evenings or on weekends depending on the needs of the cohort. As candidates work on assignments for each of the program courses, they have the opportunity to explore issues important to them in their own classrooms, schools, and districts. Each cohort is assigned a faculty advisor who works with them through the entire program. Currently, the program is approved to be delivered in the province of Alberta, Canada.

Notice for Students and Public:

This program is offered pursuant to the written approval of the Minister of Advanced Education and Technology effective September 2009, having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the Minister.  Nevertheless, prospective students are responsible for satisfying themselves that the program and the degree will be appropriate to their needs (for example, acceptable to potential employers, professional licensing bodies, or other education institutions).

Master of Education in Educational Leadership - British Columbia, Canada

This program is currently unavailable. Please see instead the Master of Education in Educational Leadership - On-line Master's Degree Program.

The Master of Education in Educational Leadership Program is an integrated program for educators who aspire to be effective educational leaders. The program is designed for working educators with a focus on linking theory and research to practical issues in leadership using candidate's local districts as the context for their study. Candidates are admitted into a cohort of educators from their local area and experience the benefits of a collaborative learning community. Faculty travel to the candidates' location. Courses are held in the evenings or on weekends depending on the needs of the cohort. As candidates work on assignments for each of the program courses, they have the opportunity to explore issues important to them in their own classrooms, schools, and districts. Each cohort is assigned a faculty advisor who works with them through the entire program. Currently, the program is offered under written consent to be delivered in the province of British Columbia, Canada.

Notice for Students and Public:

This program is offered under the written consent of the Minister of Advanced Education, Skills and Training effective June 23, 2017, having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the minister.  Nevertheless, prospective students are responsible for satisfying themselves that the program and the degree will be appropriate to their needs (for example, acceptable to potential employers, professional licensing bodies, or other educational institutions).

 

Master of Education in Educational Leadership - On-line Master’s Degree Program

The Department of Educational Leadership and Administration offers a 30-credit online program.

The Department of Educational Leadership and Administration develops reflective, educational leaders who are committed to a spirit of inquiry and social justice and who guide their communities toward a rich, equitable, and comprehensive education for all students.

The on-line Master of Education in Educational Leadership program is designed for practicing educators who aspire to become more effective formal and informal leaders in the K-12 environment. An educational leader’s key task is to foster learning for everybody in that environment.

The 30-credit program consists of 11 courses delivered across four consecutive semesters. The 10 courses in this program are designed to help educators develop the knowledge and skills that will help them create a school environment in which everyone can realize their potential.

This on-line master’s program is, at heart, a community of learners. To enhance this community of learners, this program is designed as a cohort model. Members of the cohort will begin the program through a front-loaded on-line course, then meet during the last few days in June and the first week in July on the Gonzaga campus in Spokane. While in Spokane, members of the cohort will meet each other, their cohort advisor, and their instructors. They will participate in orientation activities and some face-to-face instruction. They will then return to their homes to complete the rest of the program through on-line courses. The on-line coursework will be enhanced by personal one-to-one support via Blackboard, e-mail, telephone, and teleconferencing throughout the program.

By opening doors to people across the region and around the world, this program will enrich the lives of participants as we bring together people from different social, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds.


Program Outline: 30 credits

Master of Education in Educational Leadership is a 30 credit degree program.

EDLA 618 Professional Literature Review 3 credits
EDLA 626 Cultural Competence Development 3 credits
EDLA 628 Educational Leadership and Inquiry 3 credits
EDLA 633 Educational Leadership and Organizations 3 credits
EDLA 638 Educational Leadership: Change, Management, and Supervision 
3 credits
EDLA 641 Educational Leadership and Community 3 credits
EDLA 653 Educational Leadership: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment 3 credits
EDLA 688 Evidence-Informed Decision Making 3 credits
EDLA 689 Professional Seminar 3 credits
EDLA 698 Research and Data Analysis 3 credits
EDLA 699 Comprehensive Oral Exam 0 credits

Master of Education in Educational Leadership with Principal or Program Administrative Certification is designed for those individuals that wish to complete their master's degree with certification in the State of Washington.

EDLA 612 Leadership Role Seminar (fall) 3 credits
EDLA 613 Leadership Role Seminar (spring) 3 credits
EDLA 620 Certification Internship (fall) 3 credits
EDLA 630 Certification Internship (spring)

3 credits

The Department offers the following certification program:

Principal Certification

The Department of Educational Leadership and Administration understands that school leaders face many challenges, including legislated learning, under-funded programs, and the demands of a global economy, and increasing pressures for school reform, assessment, and accountability. School leadership programs begin with the assumption that school leaders do more than provide effective supervision. Today’s school leaders also work with peers, administrators, and parents to achieve school, district, and state goals. Research on school leadership indicates that student achievement is heavily influenced by the ethos of the school. An effective school ethos is characterized by faculty collegiality, collaboration, and a sense of community in which leaders demonstrate the courage to address tough issues, the commitment and care to improve conditions for everyone in the community, and the individual, personal and technical competence to be effective.

Admissions

Selection of candidates is based on the information gathered from the materials identified below. Each applicant should submit the following materials to the School of Education Graduate Admissions Office:

  1. A completed application form (see the School of Education website: http://www.gonzaga.edu/soe/grad)
  2. Two letters of recommendation from Principal / Colleague
  3. Two nomination letters from Superintendent and Principal
  4. A copy of your résumé
  5. A written statement of purpose
  6. A copy of your teaching or ESA certificate from WA State
  7. A copy of your abuse course taken.
  8. One official transcript all colleges or universities attended, one must be degree barring.International applicants must submit foreign transcripts in the original language and an English copy.Final transcripts must bear a posted bachelor's degree from an accredited university.

Prerequisites

A Master’s Degree from an accredited institution, a valid teaching or ESA certificate, currently employed in a K-12 setting in the state of Washington, and a minimum of (three) 3 years of K-12 experience.

The Principal Certification Program consists of 12 credits

Program Outline:

EDPC 912 Leadership Role Seminar (fall) 3 credits
EDPC 920 Certification Internship (fall) 3 credits
EDPC 913 Leadership Role Seminar (spring) 3 credits
EDPC 930 Certification Internship (spring) 3 credits

Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership (EdD)

The Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership is a cohort-based program that consists of 51 credits distributed across 7 semesters. The program is delivered through three summer semesters of traditional face-to-face classes in Spokane, supplemented by four semesters of on-line courses that support candidates throughout two academic years, and supported by regular contact and individualized coursework with doctoral advisors and field-based mentors. Candidates will develop a capstone project in which they effectively leverage data to deal with a problem of practice in their professional setting. This hybrid program will enable candidates to continue working in their professions as they complete their doctoral studies. The EdD program includes the completion of a capstone project that will demonstrate a synthesis and culmination of the candidate’s work. Candidates will engage in scholarly inquiry to analyze, evaluate, and effectively leverage data in order to deal with a self-identified problem of professional practice.

Admissions

Admissions decisions will be made through the use of weighted criteria. The faculty of the EdD program will determine admission into the program based on a rubric-based evaluation of prior academic work, three recommendations, résumé, and a written statement. The weighted criteria for those elements will result in a decision to interview or not interview, either in person or via Skype.

In making our admission decisions, we consider the applicant’s leadership qualities, character, motivation, commitment to social justice through pre-K-12 education, ability to work independently and in teams, academic ability, and writing ability. Admission to this program requires a master’s degree or its equivalent and at least five (5) years of professional experience in the pre-K-12 school (or closely related) environment.

We gather this information through the following required application materials:

  1. Evidence of a minimum of five years of relevant professional experience in the pre-K-12 environment or other relevant educational experience.
  2. Application form, in the EdD admissions packet, submitted to the Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership in the School of Education.
  3. Two official transcripts from the university at which highest degree was earned.
  4. Evidence of an earned master’s degree with a minimum 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale.
  5. Three letters of recommendation (two from current or recent supervisors, one from other stakeholder such as board member, university instructor, or community member, but NOT to include faculty who will teach in Gonzaga’s EdD program), all three of which are included in the EdD Application Packet. Please ensure that these three letters of recommendation adhere to Department guidelines and are submitted directly from the recommending persons to the SOE Graduate Admission office using the confidential recommendation forms (SOE website: School of Education). Department guidelines for letters of recommendation to the Doctoral program: Please write your letter of recommendation on school or district letterhead. It is crucial that you address all of the items. We score the candidate’s likelihood of success in doctoral work and “fit” to our program against all of these criteria: Describe and give examples of the applicant’s ability to lead, or describe and give examples of the applicant’s leadership experiences in professional setting. Please attach the Confidential Recommendation forms in which you rate the candidate according to the scale five (5) strongly agree to one (1) strongly disagree. The last column on the rating sheet may be checked if you're feel you have “insufficient knowledge” of the candidate to make a judgment. (see the School of Education website).
  6. A current CV, vita, or résumé that adheres to the following Department guidelines:
    1. Identify your professional experience in the pre-K-12 environment or other relevant educational experience.
    2. Identify evidence of your leadership responsibilities with individuals, teams, departments, and/or committees.
    3. Identify your progression in the field with evidence of training, increasing responsibility in, or contribution to, the field, and/or volunteer service to the community.
  7. A personal written statement of no more than 500 words. In this written statement, do these four things:
    1. Articulate your professional mission and purpose.
    2. Articulate what you expect to learn that will support you in your mission and purpose.
    3. Identify a problem of professional practice that you would like to address.
    4. Tell how addressing that problem will help you realize your mission and purpose.
  8. An interview, via telephone, skype, or in person, with the Department Chair, Program Director, and another member of the EdD faculty.
  9. A $50.00 non-refundable fee.

Gonzaga welcomes applications from international students. If you are an international student, please complete and include a Financial Declaration form, the Form I-20, a financial declaration form, and a copy of your passport picture page. Non-native English speaking students must present evidence of English proficiency sufficient for graduate-level work. Gonzaga University requires the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and that the official scores be sent from ETS. In lieu of the TOEFL*, Gonzaga will accept satisfactory completion of Level 108 of the University’s English as a Second Language program with a grade point average of at least 3.0 and the recommendation of the ESL faculty. Applicants should submit transcripts in both their native language and a professional, certified English translation. Photocopies are not accepted as official documents and may not be used for evaluation purposes.

Deadlines

Applications to the EdD program are due by January 31.  EdD faculty will review applications and screen candidates for interviews during the first week of February, and conduct interviews through mid-February. We will notify prospective students of admission decisions by the end of February. Classes begin in July.

Non-Matriculation

Due to the nature of the cohort model, the EdD program does not accept students on a non-matriculated basis.

Program Outline: 51 credits

 The Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership is a 51-credit degree program.

Prerequisites

A master’s degree from an accredited college or university is required, with a minimum 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale.

At least five (5) years of professional experience in the pre-K-12 school (or closely related) environment.

Program Outline: 51 credits
EDLD 701Framework for Effective Leadership 3 credits
EDLD 702 Culture and Identity 3 credits
EDLD 703 Research Methods and Data Collection 3 credits
EDLD 704 Data Sources, Priorities, and Planning 3 credits
EDLD 705A Review of Literature on Problem of Practice 3 credits
EDLD 705BProblem of Practice Internship I 1 credit
EDLD 706 Leveraging Fiscal Resources 3 credits
EDLD 707A Action Plan for Problem of Practice 3 credits
EDLD 707B Problem of Practice Internship II 1 credit
EDLD 708 School Improvement: People, Data, Processes 3 credits
EDLD 709 Ethics: A Higher Standard of Leadership 3 credits
EDLD 710 Data Analysis 3 credits
EDLD 711 Building Capacity: Continuous Improvement 3 credits
EDLD 712A Leadership Integration for Problem of Professional Practice 3 credits
EDLD 712B Problem of Practice Internship III 1 credit
EDLD 713 System-wide Curriculum and Assessment 3 credits
EDLD 714 Capstone Completion 3 credits
EDLD 715 Organizational Analysis: Overcoming Systemic Barriers 3 credits
EDLD 799 Doctoral Conference and Oral Exam 3 credits
EDLA 564 Art and Science of Teaching
3.00 credits
This course examines frameworks for enhancing student learning from the perspectives of leadership in the classroom and at the building or district level. The course will build on the educational applications of brain research and on strategies for creating safe and effective learning environments. Candidates will be asked to apply course content at the classroom level and school leadership level.
EDLA 565 Assessment and Learning
3.00 credits
This course is designed to help candidates extend their expertise in applied educational measurement at the classroom, building, district, state, provincial, and national levels. The philosophical, cultural, ethical, and political issues surrounding assessment and evaluation will be examined from the perspectives of classroom practitioners and school leaders. Candidates will also focus on involving students in a variety of rigorous assessment methods to promote a fair, supportive, and reciprocal learning environment.
EDLA 597 Instructional Practicum
3.00 credits
This is a field-based experience for practicing teachers. The focus is on the development and documentation of growth standards from research on teaching. Teachers use peer coaching, effective schools research, climate expectations, and goal setting strategies. Some application of specific models, social styles, and positive growth strategies may be involved.
EDLA 600 Program Administrator Intern
3.00 credits
The internship is planned for candidates contemplating a calling to central office administration. This two semester course field experience places the candidate-administrator in a firsthand work experience in which academic knowledge can be applied in the educational setting. The candidate's experience is aligned to Washington State Program Administrator Certification requirements.
EDLA 601 Professional Development
1.00- 5.00 credits
This course is designed for experienced teachers. The course involves both in-class and field-based learning.
EDLA 609 Program Adm Role Seminar
2.00 credits
This course is delivered through a series of five seminars during the candidates' internship year. Attendance of each seminar in the specific sequence is mandatory. Seminar topics include budget allocation and distribution, staffing, ASB funds, special education law, personnel, public relations and the job search process.
EDLA 610 Program Administrator Intern
3.00 credits
The internship is planned for candidates contemplating a calling to central office administration. This two semester course field experience places the candidate administrator in a firsthand work experience in which academic knowledge can be applied in the educational setting. The candidate's experience is aligned to Washington State Program Administrator Certification requirements.
EDLA 611 Continuing Education
1.00 credit
This is an individualized study designed by the student in consultation with the professor. It requires self-directed learning in a selected area of interest; the professor serves as resource.
EDLA 612 Leadership Role Seminar
3.00 credits
This course is delivered through a series of five seminars during the candidate's internship year. Attendance of each seminar in the specific sequence is mandatory. Seminar topics include budget allocation and distribution, staffing, ASB funds, special education law, personnel, public reflections and the job search process. Fall.
EDLA 613 Leadership Role Seminar
3.00 credits
This course is delivered through a series of five seminars during the candidate's internship year. Attendance of each seminar in the specific sequence is mandatory. Seminar topics include budget allocation and distribution, staffing, ASB funds, special education law, personnel, public reflections and the job search process. Spring.
EDLA 618 Professional Literature Review
3.00 credits
This course will guide candidates through the first steps in the process of evidence-informed decision making. Candidates will learn how to articulate a topic that is specific to their problem of professional practice, access research-based literature specific to the problem of practice that guides their action research project, analyze and critique the relevant literature, marshal the relevant literature into a coherent whole, learn and practice skills in graduate level writing, and then write a professional review of the literature according to APA and Departmental guidelines.
EDLA 620 Principal Internship
3.00 credits
The internship is planned for the candidate's second year in the program. The field experience places the candidate-administrator in a firsthand experience in which academic knowledge can be applied to the educational setting. The candidate's experience is aligned to Washington State principal certification requirements.
EDLA 623 Risk and Protective Factors
3.00 credits
This course addresses the interdependency of family, school and community as they impact the school-aged child. Risk factors are addressed, as well as protective factors that can support family, school, and community in fostering resiliency in children.
EDLA 625 Classroom Intervention Skills
3.00 credits
This course offers teachers the opportunity to learn communication and counseling skills that can be used within the instructional settings. Supportive classroom management techniques that result in logical consequences and assist the child in accepting responsibility for behavior are addressed. This course focuses on a multitude of methods and modalities in order to address various learning styles to reduce non-academic stressors.
EDLA 626 Culture and Diversity
3.00 credits
Candidates will examine issues concerning accepting, respecting, appreciating, and accommodating all members of society who are entitled to enjoy the benefits of education, regardless of their race, color, national origin, gender, native language, age, social or economic status, family structure and lifestyle, sexual orientation, religious perspective, or ability level. Candidates will explore diversity from a global perspective.
EDLA 627 Teacher as Counselor
3.00 credits
This introductory course addresses the metacognitive aspects of the teacher as person and counseling skill development for classroom teacher use. Areas of emphasis will include self-awareness, awareness of impact on others, recognizing and attending to different learning styles and personality types, maintaining healthy relationships with others, and creating a vision for the future. It will focus on personal and academic growth.
EDLA 628 Ed Leadership and Inquiry
3.00 credits
This course includes methods and strategies teachers can use to match pedagogy to the various learning styles of students. Teachers translate theory into practice through experiences within the classroom as well as collaborate with families and community agencies. The course focuses on practical application of theory by the creation of curricula using methods, strategies, and resources that have been designed to facilitate child resiliency, involve family, and utilize school and community resources.
EDLA 630 Principal Internship
3.00 credits
The internship is planned for the candidate's second year in the program. The field experience places the candidate-administrator in a firsthand experience in which academic knowledge can be applied to the educational setting. The candidate's experience is aligned to Washington State Principal Certification requirements.
EDLA 633 Ed Leadership & Organizations
3.00 credits
This course is designed to enhance candidates’ understanding of organizations and to build their capacity as leaders with and without authority to help their organization achieve its goals. Candidates will apply leadership theories in an analysis of their problem of practice.
EDLA 635 Principalship
3.00 credits
This course explores the role of the building administrator. It examines the nature of school leadership in today’s schools; core values and beliefs; and the relationships of the principal with students, teachers, parents, and the community.
EDLA 638 Ed Ldrshp: Chng, Mngmnt, Sprvs
3.00 credits
This course is designed to provide an overview of the school leader's role in developing a shared vision, mission, and set of core values for continuous school improvement. Candidates will study fundamental leadership and management principles and skills to explore methods of effective school operations such as financial, human resources, and technology. Candidates will also study and describe the processes and practices of effective school supervision and evaluation methods embedded in trust and professional growth.
EDLA 641 Ed Leadership & Community
3.00 credits
The purpose of this course is to advance candidates understanding of school and community relationships by applying and promoting a culture of learning that is respectful of all stakeholders. This course will address the significant aspects of developing school and community partnerships that create supports for the academic, social, and emotional needs of students.
EDLA 646 Staff Development
3.00 credits
This course provides the professional teacher with an understanding of the concepts of adult learning and development and an awareness of some of the components, processes, and techniques of staff development programs. The focus is on the underlying theme of staff development programs that the professional teacher perceives learning and the acquisition of new competencies as a life-long process.
EDLA 647 Adv Learning Strategies
3.00 credits
This course is designed to identify for teachers, principals and curriculum developers a range of teaching models and instructional approaches for creating learning environments. The course provides a systematic exploration of interactions among educational objectives, pedagogical strategies, curricular designs, social and psychological theory. The course emphasizes the wide range of options teachers may adopt and adapt to their unique teaching situation. The course assists students in developing a basic repertoire of teaching models through analysis of the underlying theoretical structures, principles and procedures of four different groups of approaches to teaching. Students will have the opportunity to participate in the "coaching" process designed to assist with the acquisition of new teaching behaviors.
EDLA 648 Teacher Leadership
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the skills of promoting effective cooperation between community and school. It also includes discussion of communication strategies, team building, and meeting patron need. Prerequisite: Postgraduate standing or permission. (Canada only)
EDLA 650 Instructional Practicum
3.00 credits
This is a field-based experience for practicing teachers. The focus is on the development and documentation of growth standards from research on teaching. Teachers use peer coaching, effective schools research, climate expectations, and goal setting strategies. Some application of specific models, social styles, and positive growth strategies may be involved.
EDLA 651 Supervision of Instruction
3.00 credits
This course is designed to support the position that the primary purpose of supervision is to provide the means for teachers and supervisors to increase their understanding of the teaching-learning process through collaborative inquiry that can increase classroom effectiveness and student learning. The primary assumption on which this course rests is given a democratic setting; all teachers have the potential for growth and are capable of making appropriate instructional decisions based on relevant classroom data. Teachers are perceived as active constructors of their own knowledge about learning and teaching and supervision is viewed as a collaborative means in creating this knowledge. The emphasis is on multiple methods of collecting objective data during instruction that can be used to make inferences and interpretations regarding the effectiveness of the teaching process.
EDLA 653 Ed Ldrshp: Curr, Inst & Assmt
3.00 credits
This course addresses the basic approaches to planning and modifying school curricula and places these in historical, ideological, and political contexts. Topics include the diagnosis of needs, selection and organization of learning experiences, evaluating curricular systems, and the elements of the change process that promote equity and access to learning. Candidates will explore the implications of course concepts at the classroom, school, and district levels.
EDLA 662 Leadership and Finance
3.00 credits
This course presents a thorough overview of the economics and financing of education. This course also presents, and prepares participants for using, standard budgeting procedures for managing schools and school systems.
EDLA 663 Leadership and Law
3.00 credits
The course is designed for graduate students in education without prior formal training in school law, but who have experience working in schools. Through multiple activities students are expected to be able to identify legal issues which may arise in their jobs in school, be familiar with the legal rules which govern these issues, and be able to make an educated guess about how a court might apply these legal standards to their situation.
EDLA 665 Assessment and Learning
3.00 credits
This course is designed to help candidates extend their expertise in applied educational measurement at the classroom, building, district, state, provincial, and national levels. The philosophical, cultural, ethical, and political issues surrounding assessment and evaluation will be examined from the perspectives of classroom practitioners and school leaders. Candidates will also focus on involving students in a variety of rigorous assessment methods to promote a fair, supportive, and reciprocal learning environment.
EDLA 670 Leadership & Change Planning
3.00 credits
This course consists of one module that can be taken in either the fall or spring semesters. The module topic addresses planning for school change. The course is designed for those candidates that already hold a master's degree in the field of education and is primarily developed for those individuals that have a Principal or Program Administrator Certification.
EDLA 671 Leadership & Capacity Building
3.00 credits
This course consists of one module that can be taken in either the fall or spring semesters. The module topic addresses Leadership and Building Capacity in others. The course is designed for those candidates that already hold a master's degree in the field of education and is primarily developed for those individuals that have a Principal or Program Administrator Certification.
EDLA 680 Special Topics
.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
EDLA 688 Evdnc Informed Decision Making
3.00 credits
In this course, candidates will create an action plan specific to their problem of professional practice. This action plan will apply leadership practices to promote school growth by addressing systems change. Strategies that enhance educators' collaborative school improvement processes will be explored. Spring or Summer depending on cohort.
EDLA 689 Professional Seminar
3.00 credits
In this course, candidates will demonstrate the integration of the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program. They will also articulate their translation of theory into continuous improvement of professional practice.
EDLA 690 Directed Readings
1.00- 3.00 credits
This is an individualized study based on readings approved by professor. Student develops a selected bibliography.
EDLA 692 Independent Study
.00- 3.00 credits
This is an individualized study designed by the student in consultation with the professor. It requires self-directed learning in a selected area of interest; the professor serves as resource.
EDLA 694 Special Project
1.00- 3.00 credits
This is an individualized and project-based study, which results in a practical application of educational theory. The project or written report of project is submitted to the professor for evaluation.
EDLA 695 Professional Experience
1.00- 3.00 credits
This is a planned series of field experiences in settings related to education, junior colleges, court services, social agencies, etc.
EDLA 698 Research and Data Analysis
3.00 credits
The research course continues from the Educational Leadership and Inquiry course and focuses on helping candidates understand and apply methodological, ethical, and writing formatting issues related to the research process. The course is designed to prepare the candidates to plan and report on self-selected research projects.
EDLA 698A Research Project
3.00 credits
This is a research project for a master's degree.
EDLA 698C Research Seminar
1.00 credit
An analysis of basic elements of research proposal design.
EDLA 699 Comprehensive Oral Exam
.00 credits
The Oral Exam is the opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge acquisition, your ability to use knowledge to solve problems, and a chance to focus on yourself as a leader: how you believe you have grown—in response to each program outcome or goal. Review your work from the program that you think provides evidence of meeting the program outcomes and come prepared to discuss what you have done to meet these outcomes. You may bring notes or evidence that support your self-assessment. Bring a hard copy of the Oral Exam Reflection and email a copy to your advisor in advance of the Oral Exam. (Note: One project/assignment/experience may provide evidence for several of the outcomes or goals).
EDLA 970 Leadership & Change Planning
3.00 credits
This course consists of one module that can be taken in either the Fall or Spring semesters. The module topic addresses planning for school change. The course is designed for those candidates that already hold a Master's Degree in the field of education and is primarily developed for those individuals that have a principal or program administrator certification.
EDLA 971 Leadership & Capacity Building
3.00 credits
This course consists of one module that can be taken in either the Fall or Spring semesters. The module topic addresses Leadership and Building Capacity in others. The course is designed for those candidates that already hold a Master's Degree in the field of education and is primarily developed for those individuals that have a principal or program administrator certification.
 
EDPC 911 All but Certified (ABC)
3.00 credits
This professional development course is required for all principal and program administrator certification candidates that have not completed the certification program on time. This course is repeatable each semester until the program is complete. All candidates that have not finished the program and want to continue working towards their principal or program administrator certificate must register for this course until they have finished all requirements for certification.
EDPC 912 Leadership Role Seminar
3.00 credits
This online course delivery consists of six modules. The on-line module topics include vision for learning, instructional leadership, organizational management, school/community relations, ethical leadership, and political issues and awareness. Post-masters Administrative Certification Candidates are required to sign up for the course two consecutive semester as directed by the program director and/or internship supervisor. The first three modules of the seminar are completed in the fall and the final three modules completed in the spring.
EDPC 913 Leadership Role Seminar
3.00 credits
This online course delivery consists of six modules. The on-line module topics include vision for learning, instructional leadership, organizational management, school/community relations, ethical leadership, and political issues and awareness. Post-masters Administrative Certification Candidates are required to sign up for the course two consecutive semester as directed by the program director and/or internship supervisor. The first three modules of the seminar are completed in the fall and the final three modules completed in the spring.
EDPC 920 Certification Internship
3.00 credits
The internship is a two-semester field experience that places the student-administrator in a first-hand experience in which academic knowledge can be applied to the education setting.
EDPC 930 Certification Internship
3.00 credits
The internship is a two-semester field experience that places the student-administrator in a first-hand experience in which academic knowledge can be applied to the education setting.
EDPC 970 Leadership & Change Planning
3.00 credits
The on-line professional development course consists of one module that can be taken in either the Fall or Spring semesters. The module topic addresses planning for school change. The course is designed for those candidates that already hold Master's Degree in the field of education and is primarily developed for those individuals that have a principal for program administrator certificate.
EDPC 971 Leadership & Capacity Building
3.00 credits
The on-line professional development course consists of three modules that can be taken in either the Fall or Spring semesters. The module topics address Leadership and Building Capacity in others. The course is designed for those candidates that hold a Master’s Degree in the field of education and is primarily developed for those candidates that have a principal or program administrator certificate.
 
EDLD 701 Framework for Eff Leadership
3.00 credits
This course presents the conceptual framework for the Doctorate of Educational Leadership. Candidates will develop an understanding of the change process that is grounded in the principles of relational trust, academic press, and social support. Candidates will analyze and create a personal model for leadership based upon the needs of the organization.
EDLD 702 Culture and Identity
3.00 credits
This course defines culture and identity from local and global perspectives. It involves understanding one’s culture, the culture of groups one belongs to, and the culture of others. Candidates will explore various life/world views with practical application for educators, as they develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes that promote self-understanding and student success.
EDLD 703 Research Methods & Data Coll
3.00 credits
This course presents the research process through the development of a research proposal that includes identifying a topic that is specific to their problem of professional practice, analyzing the relevant literature, choosing an appropriate research design, following ethical and legal procedures for conducting human research, and determining the appropriate method to analyze the data. By the end of the course, candidates will be able to evaluate research designs in terms of validity, apply qualitative and quantitative data collection methods, understand the role of hypothesis testing in inferential statistics, and identify appropriate data analysis procedures for a variety of quantitative and qualitative studies.
EDLD 704 Data Sources, Priorities&Plan
3.00 credits
This on-line course focuses on evidence-based practices and the development of knowledge that is necessary for gathering and analyzing relevant data. Doctoral candidates will identify various forms of data and organizational evidence with an emphasis on utilizing the findings for school improvement and change.
EDLD 705A Review of Lit on Probl of Prac
3.00 credits
Integrated with EDLD 705B lab: Problem of Practice Internship I (13-week Field-based Internship) This course is designed to help candidates enhance their skills as school leaders by gathering and marshaling relevant data to solve specific problems of practice. This course is an individualized study based on readings that are approved by the Doctoral Advisor and are related to the candidate’s problem of professional practice. Working closely with their Doctoral Advisor and Field-based Mentor, candidates will examine the literature specific to their problem of practice and then prepare an APA-format review of that literature. This course contributes to the development of the capstone project and will reflect the candidate’s ability to engage in scholarly and organizational inquiry, to read and evaluate the relevant literature, to analyze a problem of professional practice, collect the relevant data and evidence, and to leverage that evidence for change.
EDLD 705B Lab: Probl of Practice Intern
1.00 credit
(Integrated with EDLD 705A: Review of Literature on Problem of Practice) This course is a 13-week internship with the student’s Field-based Mentor. The Doctoral Advisor will submit the course grade for 705A and 705B.
EDLD 706 Leveraging Fiscal Resources
3.00 credits
This on-line course is designed to help candidates learn how to navigate and influence state and federal governmental structures that impact the financial well-being of the system and local school initiatives. Candidates will also develop a foundation of knowledge to guide them in aligning resources at all levels of the organization so that systematic change supports the academic and professional needs at the building level.
EDLD 707A Action Plan for Probl of Pract
3.00 credits
Integrated with EDLD 707b lab: Problem of Practice Internship II (13-week Field-based Internship) In this course, candidates will build upon the work they did in the EDLA 705a Review of the Literature on Problem of Professional Practice course. This course is an individualized study in which the candidates will work closely with the Doctoral Advisor and the Field-based Mentor to analyze the findings from the review of the literature, identify what new data or evidence is required, and to make a plan to collect that new evidence. This course contributes to the development of the capstone project and will help candidates develop the skills necessary to lead a process of evidence-based decision making.
EDLD 707B Lab: Probl of Practice Intern
1.00 credit
(Integrated with EDLD 707a: Action Plan for Problem of Practice) This course is a 13-week internship with the student’s Field-based Mentor. The Doctoral Advisor will submit the course grade for 707a and 707b.
EDLD 708 Schl Imnprove:People,Data,Proc
3.00 credits
The purpose of this course is to provide candidates a foundation in the systems approach for change based upon evidence that promotes a culture for learning. Candidates will learn about an integrated approach in creating school structures that are grounded in achievement and the social, emotional, and behavioral needs of students. Candidates will analyze information and create a plan, based upon the processes learned, that is informed through data and promotes action in supporting teaching and learning.
EDLD 709 Ethics:Higher Standard of Ldr
3.00 credits
This course provides an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the function of philosophical inquiry and ethical analysis in the field of educational leadership. This course also provides a practical orientation to the understanding of forces that affect the ethical decision-making of school leaders. Candidates will analyze the ethical frameworks that bound their professional practice. Through critique of philosophy, theory, and personal practice, as well as classroom situation and analysis, candidates will broaden their understanding of a variety of divergent frameworks of ethical decision-making and relate what they have learned to their professional practice. Particularly in an era of increasing regulatory mandates and decreasing availability of both human and institutional resources, an understanding of the function of ethical analysis is of critical importance in the identification, elucidation, and resolution of controversies in school systems.
EDLD 710 Data Analysis
3.00 credits
This course builds upon the skills developed in EDLD 704 Data Sources, Priorities, and Planning, EDLD 705a Review of Literature on Problem of Practice, and EDLD 707a Action Plan for Problem of Practice. Candidates will analyze the evidence they have gathered to improve student learning or the professional environment. This course contributes to, and will be documented in, the candidate’s capstone project.
EDLD 711 Bldg Cap Continuous Improve
3.00 credits
This on-line course is designed to help candidates align the strengths, interests, and needs of the people they serve with the mission of the organization. Candidates will develop and articulate their mission in a way that strengthens the competence and commitment of the people they serve. Candidates will also learn how to develop and put systems in place that enhance others in a way that builds their competence and commitment in promoting learning for all stakeholders.
EDLD 712A Ldrsp Intgrtn for Prob Prof Pr
3.00 credits
Integrated with EDLD 712B Lab: Problem of Practice Internship III (13-week Field-based Internship) This course builds upon the other courses and contributes to the development of the capstone project by helping candidates integrate principles of leadership, data collection, and leveraging relevant data for meaningful change specific to their problem of practice.
EDLD 712B Lab: Prb of Practice Intrn III
1.00 credit
(Integrated with EDLD 712A: Integration for Problem of Practice) This course is a 13-week internship with the student’s Field-based Mentor. The Doctoral Advisor will submit the course grade for 712A and 712B.
EDLD 713 Sys-wide Curr & Assessment
3.00 credits
This on-line course is designed to help school leaders develop a practical knowledge of the professional, political, and organizational issues surrounding the design, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum, and to increase their ability to lead, direct, and support the learning process and continuing education for everyone in the school system. This course will help doctoral candidates develop an understanding of the various contexts in which curriculum improvement efforts occur, an understanding of the roles of various individuals and groups in curriculum improvement, and the skills necessary to lead the curriculum improvement process. This course is also designed to help school leaders develop the skills to lead the curriculum improvement cycle and the process of curricular evaluation.
EDLD 714 Capston Completion
3.00 credits
The EdD program culminates in the successful completion of a scholarly project that demonstrates a synthesis of the doctoral candidate’s work specific to a significant problem of professional practice. The EdD doctoral capstone is a tangible, academic, and professional product, such as an action plan, a publication in a professional journal, or a result that can be developed from professional practice. The capstone project will reflect the candidate’s ability to engage in scholarly and organizational inquiry to analyze a problem of professional practice, read and evaluate the relevant literature, collect the relevant data and evidence, and solve that problem of professional practice or transform a relevant aspect of professional practice. This substantive project should make a significant, evidenced-based contribution to existing knowledge in the field of educational leadership. The doctoral project may take on many forms, and it will be specific to the candidate’s area of specialization or professional interest. The topic and format of the doctoral project will be reviewed and evaluated by a committee that consists of the candidate’s Doctoral Advisor and the faculty of the Department of Educational Leadership and Administration. The candidates will design, develop, and implement the doctoral project in collaboration with the Doctoral Advisor, the instructors of the research course, along with recommendations from the Field-based Mentors.
EDLD 715 Org Anly:Overcome Syst Barrier
3.00 credits
Candidates will explore classic, modernist, and postmodernist organizational theory in the context of educational organizations. Organizations are explored through the frames of power, culture, structure, and intrapersonal and interpersonal perspectives.
EDLD 799 Doctoral Conference & Oral Ex
3.00 credits
The Oral Exam is the final, formal interaction among the doctoral candidate, the Doctoral Advisor, and the faculty of the Department of Educational Leadership and Administration. The oral exam is a time for the candidate to share reflections and to articulate the level of integration of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions gained as a participant in the doctoral program. The oral exam consists of three areas of focus: 1) The capstone project, 2) The integration of specific leadership skills, 3) Enhanced professional practice. In the capstone and integration portions of the exam, the questions asked are of an integrated and comprehensive nature. In the professional practice portion of the exam, the questions are case-based around organizational dynamics and range from comprehensive to minutely focused. The Oral Exam is scheduled at the successful completion of all coursework at conclusion of the program. Successful completion or the Oral Exam will result in the awarding of the degree Doctor of Education.
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.