Teacher Education

Chairperson: Suzann Girtz
Elementary Program Director:
 
Secondary Program Director: 

Master of Initial Teaching

Directed by our Jesuit mission, the School of Education develops socially responsible professionals who serve with care, competence, and commitment. The department of teacher education offers a thorough preparation in professional teaching at the graduate level.  It is committed to the development of exemplary educators through the integration of knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for teaching and learning in a global and democratic society. The program utilizes a cohort group structure in which entering candidates proceed through a prescribed sequence of classes together.  The Masters of Initial Teaching program leads to an elementary or secondary teacher certification in a one (1) or two (2) year program.

Applicants seeking elementary education certification will receive an elementary endorsement and teach grades K-8 as generalists in a self-contained classroom. Secondary education certification candidates teach grades 5-12 and choose a specific content area (endorsement) to teach. The content areas must be selected from one of the following approved endorsements offered at Gonzaga: biology, chemistry, physics, English language arts, social studies, health and fitness, mathematics, music, and designated world languages. Additional endorsements are encouraged. For additional endorsements, visit the certification office for requirements.

The Teacher Education program is advised by a Professional Education Advisory Board (PEAB) composed of area teachers, school administrators, educational staff associates, representatives of professional organizations, teacher candidates, and faculty.

The teacher certification program meets standards specified by the Washington Professional Education Standards Board (PESB) and the Northwest Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC).

Washington State certification requirements may change, so it is the applicant’s responsibility to stay current by checking with their School of Education advisors and the Certification Office.

Admission Requirements

Each applicant must submit the following materials to the School of Education Graduate Admissions Office:

  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.
  2. A completed application form (see the School of Education website: http://www.gonzaga.edu/soe/grad).
  3. A $50.00 non-refundable application fee.
  4. One (1) official transcript from all colleges or universities attended. Transcript analysis for endorsement is required. International applicants must submit foreign transcripts in the original language and an English copy. Only degrees and courses from a regionally accredited institution will be accepted.
  5. A written statement of purpose addressing the applicant’s
    1. commitment to becoming a K-12 educator
    2. past and present academic experiences
    3. ability to work with children or youth.
  6. Two (2) confidential letters of recommendation from individuals who have current knowledge of the applicants' teaching capabilities. Gonzaga University Recommendation forms are required. Individuals recommending the applicant should be selected with care and be able to attest to the qualities listed on the Confidential Recommendation forms (see the School of Education website).
  7. A resume, template provided.
  8. A personal interview with the MIT admissions committee.
  9. Passing score for the Basic Skill Requirement in each category: Reading, Writing, and Math with minimum scores in either the WEST B, SAT, ACT or CBEST test.
  10. Passing score for the WEST E or NES test in the applicant's primary content area
  11. Submission of an official TOEFL score of at least 550 (minimum score of 80 if taken via internet) by each international applicant who has graduated from a foreign college or university and who native language is not English.
  12. Submission of a financial declaration and supporting documentation by each international applicant.
 

Elementary Education Certification: 43 credits

EDPE 517 Abuse Prevention 1 credit
EDPE 518 Physical Education and Health Methods 3 credits
EDSE 501 Psychology of Children with Exceptionalities 3 credits
EDTE 505 Field Experience I 1 credit
EDTE 506 Field Experience II 1 credit
EDTE 507 Field Experience III 1 credit
EDTE 509 Mathematics Methods 3 credits
EDTE 510 Science Methods 2 credits
EDTE 511 Instructional Foundations 3 credits
EDTE 512E Elementary Differentiated Instruction and Assessment 3 credits
EDTE 537 Integrated Instruction: Language Arts, Art, Music and Drama 2 credits
EDTE 540 Foundations of Reading and Language Arts 3 credits
EDTE 550 Social Studies Methods 2 credits
EDTE 555E Classroom Environment: Management/Procedures/Routines 3 credits
EDTE 632 Educational Research and Assessment 3 credits
EDTE 633 Research and Evaluation 2 credits
EDTE 689 Professional Seminar A/B 1 credit
EDTE 696A Elementary Student Teaching 6 credits

Secondary Education Certification: 37 credits

EDPE 517 Abuse Prevention  1 credit
EDSE 501 Psychology of Children with Exceptionalities  3 credits
EDTE 505 Field Experience I 1 credit
EDTE 506 Field Experience II 1 credit
EDTE 507 Field Experience III 1 credit
EDTE 511 Instructional Foundations 3 credits
EDTE 512S Secondary Differentiated Instruction and Assessment 3 credits
EDTE 518 Discipline Specific Literacy 3 credits
EDTE 520 Teaching in the Middle School 3 credits
EDTE 554 Discipline Specific Methods 3 credits
EDTE 555S Classroom Environment: Management Procedures/Methods 3 credits
EDTE 632 Educational Research and Assessment 3 credits
EDTE 633 Research and Evaluation 2 credits
EDTE 689Professional Seminar 1 credit
EDTE 696B Secondary Student Teaching 6 credits

 

Optional Endorsements

ESL English Speakers of Other Language Endorsement - 14 credits

MTSL 503 Immigrant and Refugee Perspectives 3 credits
MTSL 501 Theory and Practice of Language Teaching 3 credits
MTSL 508 Principles of Second Language Acquisition 3 credits
EDTE 566 Literacy for English Language Learners 3 credits
MTSL 550 Language Awareness 1 credit
MTSL 580 TESOL Field Experience 1 credit

Reading Endorsement – 17 Credits

EDTE 540 Reading, Writing, & Communication I 3 credits
EDTE 537 Reading, Writing & Communication II 3 credits
EDTE 505 Field Experience 1 credit
EDTE 561 Reading Diagnosis 3 credits
EDTE 562 Child and Adolescent Literature 3 credits
EDTE 564 Reading Practicum 1 credit
EDTE 566 Literacy for English Language Learners 3 credits
EDTE 505 Field Experience I
1.00 credit
Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to explore firsthand the instruction, assessment, and technology practices that are at work in schools. The course will aid the teacher candidate to focus and integrate learning by observing, reflecting and analyzing instructional events in the school site. The course will enable teacher candidates to observe and participate in instructional decision-making strategies for differentiation, and various assessment models. Teacher candidates are required to submit a Field Experience Request form to the Field Experience Office a minimum of a month prior to the semester they are taking the course. This form can be found on Blackboard under Teacher Certification & Field Experience Materials Course. . The field experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the classroom and travel by car may be required. In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
EDTE 506 Field Experience II
1.00 credit
Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to explore firsthand the instruction, assessment, and technology practices that are at work in schools. The course will aid the teacher candidate to focus and integrate learning by observing, reflecting and analyzing instructional events in the school site. The course will enable teacher candidates to observe and participate in instructional decision-making strategies for differentiation, and various assessment models. Teacher candidates are required to submit a Field Experience Request form to the Field Experience office a minimum of a month prior to the semester they are taking the course. This form can be found on Blackboard under Teacher Certification & Field Experience Materials Course. The field experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the classroom and travel by car may be required. In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
EDTE 507 Field Experience III
1.00 credit
Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to explore firsthand the instruction, assessment, and technology practices that are at work in schools. The course will aid the teacher candidate to focus and integrate learning by observing, reflecting and analyzing instructional events in the school site. The course will enable teacher candidates to observe and participate in instructional decision-making strategies for differentiation, and various assessment models. Teacher candidates are required to submit a Field Experience Request form to the Field Experience Office a minimum of a month prior to the semester they are taking the course. This form can be found on Blackboard under Teacher Certification & Field Experience Materials Course. The field experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the classroom and travel by car may be required. In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
EDTE 509 Mathematics Methods
3.00 credits
This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates for teaching mathematics to elementary students. The course will present current theory and practice in mathematics education. Specifically, candidates will develop the knowledge, skills and disposition to teach mathematics to all children.
EDTE 510 Science Methods
2.00 credits
This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates for teaching science to elementary students. The course will present current theory and practice in science education. Specifically, candidates will understand how students develop understanding of scientific concepts and learn and apply science specific pedagogy in instructional planning assessment. Spring.
EDTE 511 Instructional Foundations
3.00 credits
This course examines the philosophical social, historical and theoretical foundations of learning, intelligence, and instruction in the context of culturally diverse populations. The course also addresses issues and needs pertaining to contemporary American society from both ethical and legal perspectives. Themes include learning theory and human development, philosophy and history of education, cultural competency, ethics, and law as they relate to the classroom teacher.
EDTE 512E Elem Diff Instr & Assmnt
3.00 credits
This course is designed to engage student teacher candidates in developing competencies and strategies for successful teaching within multiple content areas and with a range of student learning abilities: race, color, national origin, gender, native language, age, social or economic status, family structure and lifestyle, religious preference, or disability. The course will cover the essential elements of K-8 instruction: planning, implementation, accommodations, differentiation and assessment of instruction, and the integration of technology to meet the Washington State's Common Core.
EDTE 512S Sec Diff Instr & Assmnt
3.00 credits
This course is designed to engage student teacher candidates in developing competencies and strategies for successful teaching within multiple content areas and with a range of student learning abilities: race, color, national origin, gender, native language, age, social or economic status, family structure and lifestyle, religious preference, or disability diverse learners. The course will cover the essential elements of 6-12 instruction: planning, implementation, accommodations, differentiation and assessment of instruction, and the integration of technology to meet the Washington State's Common Core.
EDTE 518 Discipline Specific Literacy
3.00 credits
This course presents the theory and practice for developing interdisciplinary literacy in secondary classrooms including the structure and development of language and its effective expression in specific disciplines are presented in this course. In particular, students gain competencies in working with texts, supporting academic language development, and adapting instruction to make it accessible to English language learners.
EDTE 520 Teaching in the Middle School
3.00 credits
The purpose of this course is to help the prospective middle level/secondary teacher candidate develop in-depth knowledge and understanding of early adolescents. The middle school reform movement and the developmental characteristics and the needs of adolescents provide a framework for this course.
EDTE 531 Inst Meth:Rdg/Wrtg/Comm II
3.00 credits
The purpose of this course is twofold: one, to prepare teachers to create appropriate methods for teaching literacy which provide opportunities for children to become involved with literacy in a purposeful and meaningful manner and, second, to become aware of available literary resources, including technology for thematic teaching.
EDTE 537 Integrated Instruction
2.00 credits
Candidates will become proficient in creating appropriate opportunities for children to engage in a meaningful way with authentic literature through a variety of methods. Students will develop an integrated curriculum for classroom implementation at a designated grade level, K-12 which appeals to different learning styles and is compatible with state mandates. This integrated curriculum will be in a thematic format which will connect the content areas through the fine arts and the language arts.
EDTE 540 Fndn of Reading and Language
3.00 credits
This course provides candidates with the opportunity to investigate theories and practices supporting reading and language arts instruction in K-8 schools. Teacher candidates develop a repertoire of instructional practices to plan for student learning in reading development, writing, grammar, and spelling. Practical approaches to assessment incorporated in the lesson plan.
EDTE 550 Social Studies Methods
2.00 credits
This course presents a global approach to the teaching of social studies at the elementary level with an emphasis on age appropriate strategies for teaching major concepts in the variety of social science disciplines.
EDTE 553 Methods for Teaching ELL
3.00 credits
This course is designed to prepare elementary and secondary candidates to effectively plan, adapt and design instruction to support English Language Learners' linguistic and academic development. Candidates will explore, analyze, and enact a variety of ELL teaching and assessment methods that can be applied across grade levels, classroom contexts, and content areas.
EDTE 554E Secondary Methods-English
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements.
EDTE 554F SecondaryMethods-SocialStudies
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements.
EDTE 554L Field Exp: Add-On Endorsement
1.00 credit
This is a lab course which will accommodate teacher candidates who add-on and additional endorsement. Teacher candidates are required complete a Field Experience Request form prior to taking this course which can be found on the Gonzaga School of Education website under Field Experience. This course must be taken concurrently with an EDTE 554A—T Discipline Specific Methods course. Requires current fingerprint clearance throughout the semester and Character & Fitness form on file. Fall only.
EDTE 554M Secondary Methods-Math
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements
EDTE 554S Secondary Methods-Science
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements
EDTE 554T Secondary Methods-World Lang
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements
EDTE 555E Clssrm Env:El Mgmt, Proc & Rtn
1.00- 3.00 credits
Teacher candidates are provided with strategies to manage the elementary classroom to create a motivated classroom climate, communicate with teacher candidates, parents, school, and community agencies, and to deal effectively with problem situations, management, instructional approaches, and corrective measures. Teacher as leader will be the primary metaphor which requires candidates to investigate the role of power and communication in teaching.
EDTE 555S Clssrm Env:Sec Mgmt, Proc &Rtn
1.00- 3.00 credits
Teacher candidates are provided with strategies to manage the elementary classroom to create a motivated classroom climate, communicate with teacher candidates, parents, school, and community agencies, and to deal effectively with problem situations, management, instructional approaches, and corrective measures. Teacher as leader will be the primary metaphor which requires candidates to investigate the role of power and communication in teaching.
EDTE 561 Reading Diagnosis
3.00 credits
The course provides teacher candidates with the in-depth skills and knowledge to identify and diagnose reading strengths and deficiencies of K-12 students. Appropriate instructional strategies for remediation and extension are developed and implemented. This class incorporates field experience components and is intended for the reading endorsement.
EDTE 562 Child and Adol Literature
3.00 credits
This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills in research-based assessment for MIT candidates to become prepared to enter the teaching profession. Course topics include practitioner-based research, activities to further clarify professional identity and knowledge of students, opportunities to collect and analyze student work samples and assignments to integrate artifacts into a plan for action to promote learning and equity in the classroom.
EDTE 564 Practicum Reading
1.00- 4.00 credits
This course creates and applies literacy instruction/ assessment strategies in a K-12 classroom setting. School location arranged. Practicum requires completion of a form, and Dept. permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB. This course is intended for the reading endorsement.
EDTE 566 Literacy & Engl Lang Learner
3.00 credits
This course provides literacy knowledge related to working with English learners. Teacher candidates and tutors will create classroom materials for English language learners to support their learning of literacy knowledge. Teacher candidates will take theoretical knowledge that will be translated into practical application through the creation of lesson plans, stories and tutoring. This course is intended for the reading endorsement.
Equivalent:
MTSL 514 - OK if taken since Fall 2004
EDTE 590 Directed Readings
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Readings requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
EDTE 591 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Study requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
EDTE 592 Independent Study
.00- 6.00 credits
Independent Study requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
EDTE 594 Special Project
1.00- 6.00 credits
Independent Study requires completion of a form, and departmental permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
EDTE 611 Continuing Thesis Education
1.00 credit
EDTE 632 Ed Research and Assessment
3.00 credits
This course, a two-credit continuation of educational research, is the second of four research classes offered to Masters of Initial Teaching (MIT) candidates over the span of one year. It is designed to provide the knowledge and skills in qualitative/action research and continue to explain the components of the Student Impact Project (SIP), as well as their connection to the Teacher Performance Assessment, especially the Assessment Task. Course topics to include examples of practitioner-based research, activities to further clarify professional identity and knowledge of students, opportunities to collect and analyze study work samples and assignments to integrate artifacts into a personalized research plan.
EDTE 633 Ed Research & Data Eval
2.00 credits
This course, a two-credit continuation of EDTE 632, is the second of two research courses offered to Masters of Initial Teaching (MIT) candidates over the span of one year. It is designed to provide a review of the knowledge and skills in qualitative/action research, an overview of data analysis methodologies.
EDTE 689 Professional Seminar
1.00 credit
This seminar focuses on the final preparation and presentation of a capstone performance project. It provides the opportunity for critical review by peers and professors. The Professional Seminar is the formal presentation of the completed project. Graduate students present their project before a committee of graduate faculty, peers, and members of the community. Successful completion of the project is required for granting of the MIT degree.
EDTE 696A Student Teaching - Elementary
6.00 credits
This is a culminating 16 week capstone experience in which the teacher candidate assumes the full responsibility of an elementary teacher under the direction of a University supervisor and a co-operating teacher. Concurrent seminars are provided for student interaction, problem solving, certification requirements and informational support. Current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
EDTE 696B Student Teaching - Secondary
6.00 credits
This is a culminating 16 week capstone experience in which the teacher candidate assumes the full responsibility of a secondary teacher under the direction of a University supervisor and a co-operating teacher. Concurrent seminars are provided for student interaction, problem solving, certification requirements and informational support. Current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
EDTE 900 Workshop
1.00- 12.00 credits
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.