Counselor Education

Chairperson: Curtis Garner

Degrees:

Mission Statement for the Department of Counselor Education

Following the Jesuit tradition with ever-increasing awareness of human nature, diversity, social issues and the power relationship, we model and promote theory and reflection informed transformational leaders who are intentional, ethical counselors of growth and learning in families, schools, and communities.

Department Theme Statement

We are kind practitioners who are intentional in the development of relationships that honor the strengths of all individuals and the promotion of transformational growth.

Admissions

Each applicant must submit the following materials to the School of Education Graduate Admissions Office:

  1. A completed application form (see the School of Education Website: http://www.gonzaga.edu/soe/grad) and non-refundable fee.
  2. A written statement of purpose addressing the following two topics (one typed page, single spaced):
    a. a description of interests in graduate studies in counseling and relation to the desire to become a counselor; and
    b. an assessment of current strengths as a potential counselor and description of benefits in gaining a counseling master’s degree.
  3. A minimum of two letters of recommendation to be sent directly from the recommending persons (your employer, professor, supervisor, or colleague) to the School of Education Graduate Admissions Office using the Confidential Recommendation forms (see the School of Education website: http://www.gonzaga.edu/soe/grad).
  4. One official transcript from each college or university attended (international applicants must submit foreign transcripts in the original language and an English copy), final transcripts must bear a posted bachelor’s degree.  Only degrees and courses from a regionally accredited institution will be accepted.
  5. Submission of an official TOEFL score of at least 550 (minimum score of 80 if taken via Internet) by each international applicant who has graduated from a foreign college or university and whose native language is not English.
  6. Submission of a financial declaration form and supporting documentation by each international applicant.
  7. Final acceptance will be based on selected candidates’ interviews.
  8. Site-Based: Although a bachelor’s degree in psychology is not a pre-requisite for admission to the site-based Master of Counseling program, it is highly recommended. For applicants without said degree, a reading list will be provided and students must pass a knowledge-based competency exam prior to advancement to candidacy.

Credit Transfer Information

With departmental permission a student may be permitted to take graduate courses up to 12 semester credits in a non-matriculated manner before full admission to the program. No more than six graduate credits from another accredited university (less than five years old) are applicable toward the degree before admission. Ask your advisor for transfer credit information.

Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Clinical Mental Health Counseling Mission

The Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program models ethical, moral, and professional leadership as counselor educators to promote development of a solid knowledge base, a sound skills set, and an experienced understanding of the process of personal transformation. Clinical mental health counseling students are prepared to live as creative, productive, morally grounded, socially just, service-oriented leaders in the profession.

This program offers preparation for professional counselors within community agencies, hospitals, college settings, private practice, and clinics. All counselor candidates attain a core of competencies with individualization taking place through supervised internship settings. Emphasis is placed on translating theory and research from coursework into services for clients. A major focus of the program is the development and operationalization of the student’s personal theory of counseling.

Program Description

The Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is designed to train professional counselors for a variety of employment settings, including family counseling, social service and mental health agencies, college counseling centers, and private practice. Qualified candidates are screened, using standard graduate school admissions and comprehensive interviews. Candidates are introduced to theoretical and practical academic teachings, which are woven together throughout the program to ensure a rich educational experience. Upon completion of the program, they are reintroduced to the community as qualified counselors who will enhance their community through service and leadership.

A major focus of the program is in developing and operationalizing the student's personal theory of counseling. Emphasis is placed on translating theory and research from course work to services for clients. Counselor training utilizes personal as well as multi-media instruction, carefully balanced to include didactic and experiential teaching. Diverse internships are available in community agency settings with 100 hours of practicum (40 hours of direct service) and 600 hours (240 hours of direct service) of internship required. Approximately 200 hours of supervision are provided by onsite and University supervisors. Core competencies are individualized to each internship setting.

Another major focus of the program is personal growth and development. It is the belief of the faculty that students must possess insight and awareness and must be clear about the boundaries between personal issues and those of the client. To that end, students are presented with a number of opportunities for self-discovery and process and are referred outside the program for counseling when necessary. Solid mental health is the foundation to providing professional counseling services.

A primary goal of Gonzaga’s counseling program is to identify and select students who present the highest potential for success as counselors. Indicators of counselor success are demonstrations of skills, emotional intelligence, conflict resolution, consistent interpersonal behaviors, recognition of strengths and weaknesses, a clear grasp of goals, and increasing knowledge of one’s impact on others.

The following skills are essential for successful counseling:

  • Counselor-Client Communication
    Counselors must be able to demonstrate paraphrasing, reflection of feelings, clarification, silence, attending, minimal verbal response, and identification of affect. The counselor must recognize the congruence of the client’s communication as demonstrated by verbal, non-verbal, and extra-verbal cues.
  • Recognition of Impact
    Counselors must be aware of how their actions may affect the client. This not only includes communication, but also confidentiality and professional standards. The counselor must take professional responsibility for providing the best possible counseling environment to assist a client’s progress.
  • Personal Growth
    Counselors should take responsibility for their own personal growth and must be able to deal with personal issues in healthy ways.
  • Conflict Resolution
    Counselors should be able to use productive methods for resolving conflicts with and between others.
  • Approach
    Client issues may be accessed cognitively, affectively, spiritually, and/or behaviorally. Counselors should be aware of traditional and innovative counseling methods.
  • Cultural Differences
    Counselors should be sensitive to the needs of multicultural populations in providing counseling intervention.
  • Consultation and Referral
    Counselors must be able to identify their areas of expertise and know when and how to consult and refer clients to specialized resources.

    Program Outline: 60 credits

    Core Required Courses
    FIRST YEAR:
    Fall Semester
    EDCE 560 Counseling Issues and Ethics 3 credits
    EDCE 570 Special Issues in Counseling 1 credit
    EDCE 639 Counseling Theories 3 credits
    EDCE 695 Counseling Pre-Practicum 4 credits
    EDCE 698 Research and Statistics 4 credits
    EDCE 586 Introduction to Clinical Mental Health Counseling 2 credits
    Spring Semester
    EDCE 588 Human Growth and Development 3 credits
    EDCE 616 Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology 4 credits
    EDCE 650 Group Process 2 credits
    EDCE 696 Counseling Practicum 4 credits
    One of the following: 3 credits
    EDCE 589 Marriage and Family Counseling
    EDCE 587 Child-Adolescent Counseling
    Summer Semester
    EDCE 565 Assessment in Counseling 3 credits
    EDCE 605 Occupational Choice and Career Development in Counseling 2 credits
    SECOND YEAR:
    Fall Semester
    EDCE 697A Counseling Internship 5 credits
    EDCE 664 Group Facilitation 2 credits
    EDCE 581 Chemical Dependency in Counseling 2 credits
    Spring Semester
    EDCE 697B Counseling Internship 5 credits
    EDCE 550 Multicultural Counseling 3 credits
    Summer Semester
    EDCE 689 Pro Sem: Advanced Theory Design 3 credits
    EDCE 699 Comprehensive Oral Examination 0 credits
    Elective Courses
    EDCE 690 Directed Readings variable credit
    EDCE 691 Directed Study variable credit
    EDCE 692 Independent Study variable credit
    EDCE 694 Special Project

    variable credit

    Students must complete an additional two elective credits to complete the required 60 credits. Electives can be taken in courses offered in Marriage and Family or School Counseling programs, summer practicum/internship course, optional electives offered through the department, or directed study in an area pertinent to the student's needs. 

    Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Counseling

    Marriage and Family Mission

    The Marriage and Family Counseling Program promotes excellence in the practice of couples and family counseling through specialized training in the development of professionalism, service, and growth. Marriage and family counseling students possess the knowledge, skills, and practices necessary to address a wide variety of issues in the context of relationships and families and are prepared to serve as advocates, educators, and leaders in strengthening individuals, families, and communities.

    This program offers preparation for professional counselors within community agencies, hospitals, college settings, private practice, and clinics. All counselor candidates attain a core of competencies with individualization taking place through supervised internship settings. Emphasis is placed on translating theory and research from coursework into services for clients. A major focus of the program is the development and operationalization of the student's personal theory of counseling.

    Program Description

    The Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Counseling is designed to train professional counselors to specialize in providing marital, couple, and family counseling for a variety of settings, including family counseling, social service and mental health agencies, college counseling centers, and private practice. Qualified candidates are screened, using standard graduate school admissions and comprehensive interviews. Candidates are introduced to theoretical and practical academic teachings, which are woven together throughout the program to ensure a rich educational experience. Upon completion of the program, they are reintroduced to the communities as qualified counselors who will enhance their community through service and leadership.

    A major focus of the program is developing and operationalizing the student's personal theory of counseling. Emphasis is placed on translating theory and research from course work to services for clients. Counselor training utilizes personal as well as multi-media instruction, carefully balanced to include didactic and experiential teaching. Diverse internships are available in community agency settings with 100 hours of practicum (40 hours of direct service) and 600 hours (240 hours of direct service) of internship are required. Approximately 200 hours of supervision are provided by onsite and University supervisors. Core competencies are individualized to each internship setting.

    Another major focus of the program is personal growth and development. It is the belief of the faculty that students must possess insight and awareness and must be clear about the boundaries between personal issues and those of the client. To that end, students are presented with a number of opportunities for self-discovery and process and are referred outside the program for counseling when necessary. Solid mental health is the foundation to providing professional counseling services.

    A primary goal of Gonzaga's counseling program is to identify and select students who present the highest potential for success as counselors. Indicators of counselor success are demonstrations of skills, emotional intelligence, conflict resolution, consistent interpersonal behaviors, recognition of strengths and weaknesses, a clear grasp of goals, and increasing knowledge of one's impact on others.

    The following skills are essential for successful counseling:

    • Counselor-Client Communication
      Counselors must be able to demonstrate paraphrasing, reflection of feelings, clarification, silence, attending, minimal verbal response, and identification of affect. The counselor must recognize the congruence of the client's communication as demonstrated by verbal, nonverbal, and extra-verbal cues.
    • Recognition of Impact
      Counselors must be aware of how their actions may affect the client. This not only includes communication, but also confidentiality and professional standards. The counselor must take professional responsibility for providing the best possible counseling environment to assist a client's progress.
    • Personal Growth
      Counselors should take responsibility for their own personal growth and must be able to deal with personal issues in healthy ways.
    • Conflict Resolution
      Counselors should be able to use productive methods for resolving conflicts with and between others.
    • Approach
      Client issues may be accessed cognitively, affectively, spiritually, and/or behaviorally. Counselors should be aware of traditional and innovative counseling methods.
    • Cultural Differences
      Counselors should be sensitive to the needs of multicultural populations in providing counseling intervention.
    • Consultation and Referral
      Counselors must be able to identify their areas of expertise and know when and how to consult and refer clients to specialized resources.

     

    Program Outline: 60 credits

    Core Required Courses
    FIRST YEAR:
    Fall Semester
    EDCE 560 Counseling Issues and Ethics 3 credits
    EDCE 639 Counseling Theories 3 credits
    EDCE 695 Counseling Pre-Practicum 3 credits
    EDCE 698 Research and Statistics 4 credits
    EDCE 583 Introduction to Marriage and Family Counseling 2 credits
    Spring Semester
    EDCE 588 Human Growth and Development 3 credits
    EDCE 616 Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology 4 credits
    EDCE 650 Group Process 2 credits
    EDCE 696 Counseling Practicum 3 credits
    EDCE 589 Marriage and Family Counseling 3 credits
    Summer Semester
    EDCE 565 Assessment in Counseling 3 credits
    EDCE 605 Occupational Choice and Career Development in Counseling 2 credits
    EDCE 603 Human Sexuality 2 credits
    SECOND YEAR:
    Fall Semester
    EDCE 697A Counseling Internship 5 credits
    EDCE 664 Group Facilitation 2 credits
    EDCE 592 Advanced Family Systems 3 credits
    Spring Semester
    EDCE 697B Counseling Internship 5 credits
    EDCE 550 Multicultural Counseling 3 credits
    EDCE 638 Theories of Couples Counseling 2 credits
    Summer Semester
    EDCE 689 Pro Sem: Advanced Theory Design 3 credits
    EDCE 699 Comprehensive Oral Examination 0 credits

    Master of Arts in School Counseling

    School Counseling Mission

    The mission of the School Counseling Program is to facilitate the development of excellence in professional competence and personal growth. School Counseling graduates are prepared for distinguished service particularly in the areas of leadership, advocacy, social justice, and a respect for diversity in support of the educational achievement and life success skills of all students.

    This program offers preparation for professional counselors who will serve in the K-12 school setting. School counselor candidates are competent in core knowledge, skills, and practice based on Washington State and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) standards. They participate in a supervised practicum (100 hours) and internship (600 hours) in the schools. The uniqueness of the program is embodied in its cohort model, the development and application of the student’s personal theory of counseling, a transformational personal and professional growth process, and the teaching of comprehensive, state of the art school counseling best practices.

    Program Description

    The Master of Arts in School Counseling is designed to train professional counselors to work with students, staff, parents, and the community to support student achievement in the areas of personal, social, academic, and career development in K-12 schools. The successful school counseling graduate receives Washington State Residency Certification as an Educational Staff Associate (ESA).

    Qualified candidates are screened using standard graduate school admissions and comprehensive interviews. Candidates are introduced to theoretical and practical academic teachings which are woven together throughout the program to ensure a rich educational experience. Upon completion of the program, they are reintroduced to the communities as qualified counselors who will enhance the educational community through service and leadership.

    A major focus of the program is developing and operationalizing the student’s personal theory of counseling. Emphasis is placed on translating theory and research from course work to services for school students. Counselor training utilizes personal as well as multi-media instruction, carefully balanced to include didactic and experiential teaching. Internships are available in school settings with 100 hours of practicum (40 hours of direct service) and 600 hours (240 hours of direct service) of internship are required. Approximately 200 hours of supervision are provided by onsite and University supervisors. Core competencies are individualized to each internship setting.

    Another major focus of the program is personal growth and development. It is the belief of the faculty that graduate students must possess insight and awareness and must be clear about the boundaries between personal issues and those of the school student. To that end, students are presented with a number of opportunities for self-discovery and process. Solid mental health is the foundation to providing professional counseling services in schools.

    A primary goal of Gonzaga’s counseling program is to identify and select graduate students who present the highest potential for success as counselors. Indicators of counselor success are demonstration of skills in emotional intelligence, conflict resolution, leadership, consistent interpersonal behaviors, recognition of strengths and weaknesses, a clear grasp of goals, and increasing knowledge of one’s impact on others.

    The following skills are essential for successful counseling:

    • Counselor-Student Communication
      Counselors must be able to demonstrate paraphrasing, reflection of feelings, clarification, silence, attending, minimal verbal response, and identification of affect. The counselor must recognize the congruence of the student’s communication as demonstrated by verbal, nonverbal, and extra-verbal cues.
    • Recognition of Impact
      Counselors must be aware of how their actions may affect the student. This not only includes communication, but also confidentiality and professional standards. The counselor must take professional responsibility for providing the best possible counseling environment to assist a student’s progress and support academic achievement.
    • Personal Growth
      Counselors should take responsibility for their own personal growth and must be able to deal with personal issues in healthy ways.
    • Conflict Resolution
      Counselors should be able to use productive methods for resolving conflicts with and between others.
    • Approach
      School student issues may be accessed cognitively, affectively, and/or behaviorally. Counselors should be aware of traditional and innovative counseling methods.
    • Cultural Differences
      Counselors should be sensitive to the needs of multicultural populations in providing counseling intervention.
    • Consultation and Referral
      Counselors must be able to identify their areas of expertise and know when and how to consult and refer students for specialized resources.

     

    Program Outline: 60 credits

    Core Required Courses
    FIRST YEAR:
    Fall Semester
    EDCE 559 Critical Issues in School Counseling 3 credits
    EDCE 639 Counseling Theories 3 credits
    EDCE 695 Counseling Pre-Practicum 3 credits
    EDCE 698 Research and Statistics 4 credits
    EDCE 585 Introduction to School Counseling 2 credits
    Spring Semester
    EDCE 588 Human Growth and Development 3 credits
    EDCE 616 Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology 4 credits
    EDCE 650 Group Process 2 credits
    EDCE 696 Counseling Practicum 3 credits
    EDCE 587 Child and Adolescent Counseling 3 credits
    EDCE 595 Special Issues in School Counseling 2 credits
    Summer Semester
    EDCE 564 Assessment in School Counseling 2 credits
    EDCE 605 Occupational Choice and Career Development in Counseling 2 credits
    EDCE 600 Trauma, Crisis, and Grief 2 credits
    SECOND YEAR:
    Fall Semester
    EDCE 581 Chemical Dependency in Schools 2 credits
    EDCE 610 Classroom Management in the Schools 2 credits
    EDCE 697A Counseling Internship 5 credits
    EDCE 664 Group Facilitation 2 credits
    Spring Semester
    EDCE 697B Counseling Internship 5 credits
    EDCE 550 Multicultural Counseling 3 credits
    Summer Semester
    EDCE 689 Pro Sem: Advanced Theory Design 3 credits
    EDCE 693 Comprehensive Orals for School Counselors 0 credits
    EDCE 699 Comprehensive Oral Examination 0 credits
    Elective Courses
    EDCE 690 Directed Readings variable credit
    EDCE 691 Directed Study variable credit
    EDCE 692 Independent Study variable credit
    EDCE 694 Special Project variable credit

    Master of Counselling (Site Based)

    Master of Counselling, Site-Based Program Mission Statement

    The Master of Counselling program provides counsellor education for students, reflecting ethical and cultural aspects of Canadian life with focus on province-related needs and trends. The program promotes the development of a solid knowledge base and strong clinical skills, while fostering personal growth and transformation. Students are prepared to be ethical, competent, service-oriented counsellor practitioners.

    This program offers preparation for professional counsellors within community agencies, schools, and clinics in Canada. Candidates attain a core of competencies, with individualization taking place through supervised internship settings. Emphasis is placed on translating theory and research from course work to services for clients. A major focus of the program is the development and operationalization of the student's personal theory of counselling. This degree is a two-year program for students and is provided in a cohort model.

    Notice for Students and Public (site-based Alberta):

    This program is offered pursuant to the written approval of the Minister of Advanced Education effective September 1, 2009, having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the Minister. Nevertheless, prospective students are responsible for satisfying themselves that the program and the degree will be appropriate to their needs (for example, acceptable to potential employers, professional licensing bodies, or other educational institutions).

    Notice for Students and Public (site-based British Columbia):

    This program is offered under the written consent of the Minister of Advanced Education, Skills &, Training effective July 28, 2017, having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the minister. Nevertheless, prospective students are responsible for satisfying themselves that the program and the degree will be appropriate to their needs (for example, acceptable to potential employers, professional licensing bodies, or other educational institutions).

    Program Outline: 43 credits

    Core Required Courses:
    EDCE 525 Introduction to Canadian Counselling 1 credit
    EDCE 551 Diversity in Counselling 2 credits
    EDCE 558 Canadian Counselling Issues and Ethics 3 credits
    EDCE 567 Career Development and Assessment in Counselling 4 credits
    EDCE 584 Counselling Across the Life Span 3 credits
    EDCE 590 Marriage and Family Counselling 3 credits
    EDCE 616 Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology 3 credits
    EDCE 640 Counselling Theories 3 credits
    EDCE 658 Group Process and Facilitation 3 credits
    EDCE 684 Pre-Practicum A in Counselling 2 credits
    EDCE 685 Pre-Practicum B in Counselling 4 credits
    EDCE 686 Practicum in Counselling 5 credits
    EDCE 689 Pro Sem: Advanced Theory Design 3 credits
    EDCE 698 Research and Statistics 4 credits
    EDCE 699 Comprehensive Oral Examination 0 credits
    Comprehensive Written Examination
    Elective Courses
    EDCE 690 Directed Readings variable credits
    EDCE 691 Directed Study variable credits
    EDCE 692 Independent Study variable credits
    EDCE 694 Special Project variable credits
    EDCE 525 Intro to Canadian Counselling
    1.00 credit
    This course provides information and insight into the roles and functions of various counselling specialties within the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta. This course serves as a prerequisite for EDCE 640 Counselling Theories and EDCE 558 Canadian Counselling Issues and Ethics. Summer.
    EDCE 550 Multicultural Counseling
    3.00 credits
    This course provides an opportunity for students to gain insight into the significance of culture and how it relates to behavior and mental health. This course includes readings and discussions of culturally sensitive diagnostic and treatment issues with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, physical status, age, socioeconomic status and religion. It is essential for future counselors to understand the unique nature of interpersonal distress and happiness on pathogenesis and health functioning. Diagnosis and treatment without consideration of such factors may constitute unethical behavior.
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 697A Minimum Grade: B-
    EDCE 551 Diversity in Counselling
    2.00 credits
    Students gain an understanding of behavior and mental health given the cultural context of relationships, issues and trends, and between multicultural and pluralistic national and international societies related to such factors as attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences of culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, education, family values, religious and spiritual values, socioeconomic status, and unique characteristics of individuals, couples, families, ethnic groups, and communities. Through learning the theories of multicultural counseling, theories of identity development, and multicultural competencies, students will understand the advocacy process needed to address institutional and social barriers that impede access, equity, and success of clients. Spring.
    EDCE 558 CA Counselling Issues & Ethics
    3.00 credits
    Content will focus on Canadian and specifically provincial (British Columbia and Alberta) issues and ethics of the Canadian Counselling and Psychology Association (CCPA) with accompanying texts and other materials that are regional and province specific. Gonzaga graduates in the counselling profession are expected to be at the forefront as leaders in the profession by role modeling the highest ethical standards possible. Through discussion, assigned reading, and written work, students develop and present their personal understanding of and response to critical issues in the counselling field. Specifically, students will study ethical and legal considerations, roles in social justice, advocacy, and conflict resolution, cultural self-awareness, the nature of biases, prejudices, processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination, and other culturally supported behaviors that are detrimental to the growth of the human spirit, mind, or body. Other issues to be discussed include professional roles, functions, and relationships with other human service providers; public and private policy processes, including the role of the professional counsellor in advocating on behalf of the profession; advocacy processes needed to address institutional and social barriers that impede access, equity, and success of clients; the ethical standards of CCPA and related entities; and applications of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling. Fall.
    EDCE 559 Critical Iss Schl Counseling
    3.00 credits
    This course introduces students to ethical and legal considerations specifically related to school counseling. Students become familiar with school law, including policies and procedures related to Student Rights and Responsibilities, students with disabilities education, child abuse prevention, and mandatory reporting. Students are exposed to both the American Counseling Association and the American School Counseling Association, codes of ethics, and the application of such in a school setting. An emphasis is placed on helping students examine and become aware of their beliefs and values and the potential impact these might have on the way they provide counseling.
    EDCE 560 Counseling Issues and Ethics
    3.00 credits
    Graduates of the Master of Arts Program in Counseling at Gonzaga University are expected to be at the forefront in demonstrating the highest ethical standards possible in the counseling profession. In a time when the helping profession is increasingly being held accountable for the behavior of its members, the development and implementation of personal and professional standards that exemplify the best in role models and leadership are imperative. Through discussion, assigned reading, and written work, students develop and present their understanding of and response to critical issues in the counseling field.
    EDCE 564 Assessment in Schl Counseling
    2.00 credits
    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and working knowledge of test and non-test methods of individual appraisal, including the selection, administration, scoring, interpretation, and application of various assessments. Individual and group measures used in schools will be reviewed and discussed. This course is not intended to qualify students to perform psychological assessments or to otherwise provide assessment services to the general public. Rather, this course is intended to familiarize students with appraisal methods and instruments used in school counseling
    EDCE 565 Assessment in Counseling
    3.00 credits
    This course is intended to familiarize students with test and non-test methods of appraisal, including administration, scoring, and interpretation of tests. Individual and group tests and clinical procedures widely used to appraise intelligence, aptitudes, interests, achievement, development, personality, and learning approaches are surveyed. It is stressed that this course is not intended to qualify students to perform psychological assessments or to otherwise perform assessment services to the public. Its purpose is to familiarize students with appraisal methods and instruments typically used in counseling and to assist students in the process of performing assessments appropriate to the counseling profession.
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 588 Minimum Grade: B- and EDCE 616 Minimum Grade: B-
    EDCE 567 Career Dev & Assmt in Cnsllg
    4.00 credits
    This course is designed to acquaint students with the theories, practice, and pragmatic aspects of vocational and life planning counselling. Students will develop their own synthesis of theoretical assumptions regarding vocational development and choice, integrate their theory into counselling practice, become familiar with information systems and centers, and prepare a comprehensive life planning program appropriate for use in the students' employment setting. Students will also become familiar with test and non-test methods of appraisal, including technical and methodological principles, administration, scoring, and interpretation of tests used in counselling with a particular focus on career assessment tools. This course is not intended to qualify student to perform assessments using psychological testing or to otherwise perform assessment services to the public without further education, training, and supervision. Rather, this course is intended to familiarize students so that they can identify and understand instruments typically used in counselling and have more expertise in the application of career assessment tools.
    EDCE 570 Special Issues in Counseling
    1.00 credit
    This course is designed to provide students with specific education regarding the following five specialty topics in relation to the profession of counseling via a monthly seminar: 1) Suicide Prevention and Assessment, 2) Consultation, 3) Trauma Response and Crisis Intervention, and 4) Models of Supervision.
    EDCE 581 Chemical Dependency/Addiction
    2.00 credits
    This class is designed to provide students with specific education regarding chemical dependency recognition, diagnosis, co-occurring disorders, and impact on medical and mental health issues. Specifically, as a result of this course and in accordance with the CACREP standards, students will know the disease concept and etiology of addiction and co-occurring disorders. They will learn appropriate counseling strategies when working with clients with addiction and co-occurring disorders. They will learn to identify standard screening and assessment instruments for substance use disorders and process addictions, as well as know the impact of co-occurring substance use disorders on medical and psychological disorders.
    EDCE 583 Intro Marital Couple Family
    2.00 credits
    This course serves as an introduction to couples and family theories and therapy. General principles of family development and systems theory are explored. The student is asked to think in relationship or systems terms regarding family behavior. Through participation in experiential assignments, students will acquire an understanding of family development and couple and family theories.
    EDCE 584 Counselling across Lifespan
    3.00 credits
    This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth exploration of the mental health issues specific to various populations across the lifespan. This course will thoroughly represent human growth and development with specific and current interventions appropriate to different developmental levels and stages. Special emphasis is placed on 'normal' development compared to 'pathological' development. Students study human behavior, including an understanding of developmental crises, disability, exceptional behavior, addictive behavior, psychopathology, and situational and environmental factors that affect both normal and abnormal behavior. There is special sensitivity to the issues of child abuse, multicultural awareness, and at-risk populations. Students are introduced to a variety of counseling procedures and interventions appropriate to both agency and school settings. Spring.
    EDCE 585 Intro to School Counseling
    2.00 credits
    This course introduces the field of school counseling and provides an overview of the profession, role and function of the counselor in the school, history and trends, and school counselor professional identity. A basic framework for comprehensive school counseling programs is introduced. Student achievement and personal/social and career development are discussed in relation to current societal and educational issues, barriers, and opportunities that may affect student success. Education reform and structure of school, guidance lesson planning and delivery, social advocacy, and counselor as consultant are among other topics covered.
    EDCE 586 Intro to CMH Counseling
    2.00 credits
    This course includes an orientation to Clinical Mental Health Counseling and familiarization with role and function, standards of care, professional ethical guidelines, and an understanding of the historical, philosophical, and social roots of counseling and consultation practices of the counseling profession.
    EDCE 587 Child & Adolescent Counseling
    3.00 credits
    This course provides specialized knowledge and skills training in counseling children and adolescents. Students will particularly work with the implementation of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) as a model for working with elementary, junior high and/or high school students who struggle with social, emotional, and behavioral challenges.
    EDCE 588 Human Growth and Development
    3.00 credits
    Through this course, students review, analyze, and interpret theories of individual and family development and transitions across the life-span; theories of learning and personality development and human behavior, including an understanding of and ability to evaluate developmental crises, disability, addictive behaviors, and environmental factors as they affect both normal and abnormal behavior. Human Growth and Development involves aspects of cognitive, behavioral, social, spiritual, physical, and emotional realms. Ethical and legal concerns will be examined, and students will be asked to assess these as they relate to human growth and development. Students will also identify and evaluate aspects at different times across the life span. This course will also explain and interpret the effects of crisis, disaster, and trauma across the life span. Effects of situational versus enduring influences will be assessed, and students will be expected to defend their judgments. Associated with human growth and development will be discussions and interpretations of resiliency in a multicultural world. Application, summary, and evaluation to those we serve will be an emphasis and will receive constant attention.
    EDCE 589 Marriage and Family Counseling
    3.00 credits
    Students examine the major contemporary theories and approaches in Marriage and Family Counseling. Major theories and concepts of family dynamics, family life cycle, and lifestyles are examined.
    EDCE 590 Marriage & Family Counselling
    3.00 credits
    Students examine the major contemporary theories and approaches in Marriage and Family Counseling. Concepts of family dynamics, family life cycle, and lifestyles in general are presented. Students will explore systems theories and related interventions as well as processes for selecting appropriate modalities for family assessment and counseling. Role and function, ethical and legal considerations, the structure and operations of professional organizations and credentialing bodies, and the implications of professional issues unique to marital, couple, and family counseling are discussed as are pertinent roles of racial, ethnic, cultural heritage, nationality, socioeconomic status, family structure, age, gender, sexual orientation, religious and spiritual beliefs, occupation, physical and mental status, and equity issues. Fall.
    EDCE 592 Adv Family Systems
    3.00 credits
    Students will engage in an advanced theoretical study with an emphasis on researched applications of family counseling.
    EDCE 594 Special Topics
    1.00- 3.00 credits
    The effects of violence, chemical dependency, and related family concerns on family dynamics and their impact on couple and family counseling. Students will understand family development and the family life cycle and the impact of specific problems and challenges on family functioning.
    EDCE 595 Spec Iss in School Counseling
    2.00 credits
    This course extends the knowledge and skill introduced in EDCE 585 as students begin the application of learning in their practicum. Emerging issues in the school setting are covered in a discussion format. Instructional and counseling strategies (multiple intelligences, solution focused counseling, resilience research, and other related topics) that support student academic and personal/social success are taught. Spring.
    Concurrent:
    EDCE 696
    EDCE 600 Trauma, Crisis, and Grief
    2.00 credits
    This course is designed to give school counselors a theoretical and practical background in crises, grief, and trauma as it relates to students and school communities. Crisis prevention and response, including suicide risk assessment, will also be addressed.
    EDCE 603 Human Sexuality
    2.00 credits
    Students will learn a basic understanding of human sexuality. Normal psycho-sexual development, sexual functioning and its physiological aspects and sexual dysfunction along with it's treatment will be covered.
    EDCE 605 Occ Chce & Career Dvlp Counsel
    2.00 credits
    This course is designed to acquaint students with the theory practice, and pragmatic aspects of vocational and life planning counseling. Students develop their own theoretical assumptions regarding vocational development and choice, integrate their theory into counseling practice, become familiar with information systems and centers, and prepare a comprehensive life planning program appropriate for use in future employment settings.
    EDCE 610 Classroom Management in School
    2.00 credits
    This course will provide an understanding of the role of the counselor in managing classroom behavior, including how to establish positive counselor-student relationships and peer relationships that help meet the student’s basic psychological needs while building a community of support within the classroom.
    EDCE 611 Continuing Research
    1.00 credit
    Required of all graduate students to maintain continuous enrollment in the program while completing their final project.
    EDCE 616 Psychpthlgy and Psychphrmclgy
    3.00- 4.00 credits
    This course is designed to provide a cognitive foundation in theoretical and treatment perspectives on psychopathological disorders of adults, including an understanding of the application of theses perspectives in clinical settings for diagnostic and treatment purposes. Attention is given to identifying the specific symptoms associated with common psychological disorders, the multi-axial evaluation system of the DSM IV, differential diagnostic considerations, and psychopharmacological issues and interventions. The issues of severity of psychosocial stressors as well as the importance of actual adaptive functioning levels associated with each disorder are covered.
    EDCE 638 Theories in Couples Counseling
    2.00 credits
    The study of the development of the couple-counseling field and the issues and theories related to its practice.
    EDCE 639 Counseling Theories
    3.00 credits
    Students in this course will have the opportunity to examine historic and current cognitive, affective, spiritual, and behavioral theoretical orientations to counseling psychology and the application of theory to counseling service, case conceptualization, and counseling interventions. From this historical and current exploration, students will begin to develop a personal model of counseling, a general framework for understanding and practicing counseling. Additionally, students will examine the historical development of consultation, explore the stages of consultation and the major models of consultation, and apply the theoretical material to case presentations. Students will also begin to develop a personal model of consultation. Fall.
    EDCE 640 Canadian Counselling Theories
    3.00 credits
    Canadian students will have the opportunity to examine historic and current cognitive, affective, spiritual, and behavioral theoretical orientations to counselling psychology and the application of theory to counselling service, case conceptualization, and counselling interventions. From this historical and current exploration, students will begin to develop a personal model of counselling, a general framework for understanding and practicing counseling. Additionally, students will examine the historical development of consultation, explore the stages of consultation and the major models of consultation, and apply the theoretical material to case presentations. Canadian students will also begin to develop a personal model of consultation. Fall.
    EDCE 650 Group Process
    2.00 credits
    This course was designed to prepare students for the potential ethical and legal dilemmas that may arise in the counseling profession. This two credit graduate level course is intended to assist students with developing knowledge about the ethical standards associated with this profession. Additionally, the identification of core values is essential to personal development. Exploration of these core values, in combination with the development of an ethical decision making model, will challenge students to be prepared for the various dilemmas they may encounter in the workforce. In order to provide the required experiential component to this course, it is offered in conjunction with EDCE 664 Group Facilitation.
    EDCE 658 Group Process and Facilitation
    3.00 credits
    This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of group counseling. Students will gain experience in developing and refining group leadership techniques with emphasis on group process and dynamics. This course will focus on both historical and current literature regarding the theoretical and experiential understandings of group purpose, developmental stages, dynamics such as roles, norms, and therapeutic factors, leadership orientations and styles, process, counseling theories, group counseling methods, and skills. Students will refine their theory and skills, and they will integrate the theoretical and experiential understandings of group theory and practice.
    EDCE 664 Group Facilitation
    2.00 credits
    This course provides experience in developing and refining group leadership techniques with emphasis on group simulations and demonstrations. Students experience a minimum of 10 clock hours of membership in small group activity as well as experience in leaders of small group.
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 650 Minimum Grade: B-
    EDCE 684 Counselling Pre-Practicum (A)
    2.00 credits
    Prior to beginning the full fall semester pre-practicum, students are introduced to the basic counselling skills of attending. Students are prepared to begin the placement experience, primarily by shadowing and observing clinical practice and receiving supervision at their site. This course serves as prerequisite for 685 Counselling Pre-practicum (B). Summer.
    EDCE 685 Counselling Pre-Practicum (B)
    4.00 credits
    Through this course, students develop skills, techniques, and the process critical to counseling. The historical development of counseling theories will be discussed with an exploration of affective, behavioral, and cognitive theories; essential interviewing and counselling skills that assist the student in creating appropriate professional boundaries therapeutic relationships, establish appropriate counseling goals, design intervention strategies, evaluate client outcome, and successfully terminate the counselor-client relationship. Students will learn and begin to personalize a general framework for understanding and practicing counseling and consultation. EDCE 685 Pre-Practicum requires 100 hours of field placement work during the fall semester immediately preceding the spring semester EDCE 686 Practicum. Those 100 hours shall be a combination of experiences including such activities as: orientation, shadowing, co-counselling (if permitted). In general, the pre-practicum placement is a time to get acclimated to the agency placement, learning the protocols, paperwork requirements, and other needs. Students may begin to accrue supervised hours. With Program Director approval and Site-Supervisor permission, some experience may be applied to the direct contact hours criteria-generally done during EDCE 686 Practicum in the spring semester (or 250 total hours). This course serves as a pre-requisite to Counselling Practicum (EDCE 686). Fall.
    EDCE 686 Counselling Practicum
    5.00 credits
    This course is designed to serve as the transition between the Pre-practicum phase of the counselor's professional development and preparation for entry level practice by providing for the continued development of counseling skills on site and under direct supervision. Students continue to gain working knowledge of record keeping, resources, and office protocol. They will regularly observe and receive feedback from the Field Supervisor and begin to carry a full caseload of clients representing the diversity of the community. Students must complete supervised practicum experiences that total a minimum of 350 clock hours (100 hour prepracticum plus 250 hour practicum). The practicum includes all of the following: a minimum of 250 hours of direct service with clients, including experience in individual counseling and group work, weekly interaction with an average of one hour per week of individual and/or triadic supervision with an onsite supervisor. Forty hours of class time in the spring semester consists of group supervision and other further didactic experiences. Also, an evaluation of the student's performance throughout the practicum, including a formal evaluation at the conclusion of the practicum will be required.
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 685 Minimum Grade: B-
    EDCE 689 Pro Sem:Advanced Theory Design
    3.00 credits
    This course is designed to prepare students for the culminating experiences in the Masters of Arts Program, the final Professional Seminar and Oral Examination. Students work with their primary professors and with their small groups to revise and refine their personal theories of counseling. Students are given the opportunity to "defend" this personal theory in a format similar to that of the actual final oral.
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 697B Minimum Grade: C or EDCE 686 Minimum Grade: B-
    EDCE 690 Directed Reading
    1.00- 4.00 credits
    Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and departmental permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
    EDCE 691 Directed Study
    1.00- 5.00 credits
    Directed Study requires completion of a form, and departmental permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
    EDCE 692 Independent Study
    1.00- 5.00 credits
    Independent Study requires completion of a form, and departmental permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
    EDCE 693 Comp Orals for Sch Counselors
    .00 credits
    EDCE 694 Special Project
    1.00- 4.00 credits
    Special Project requires completion of a form, and departmental permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
    EDCE 695 Counseling Pre-Practicum
    3.00- 4.00 credits
    Students develop their own counseling style and begin integrating their theories of counseling into a personal process of counseling. Through this course, students develop skills, strategies, and techniques critical to counseling.
    EDCE 696 Counseling Practicum
    3.00- 4.00 credits
    This course is designed to serve as the transition between the pre-practicum phase of the counselor's professional development and the internship experience. Students gain working knowledge of record keeping, resources, and office protocol. They will regularly observe and receive feedback from the Field Supervisor and begin to carry a case load of clients by the middle of the semester.
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 695 Minimum Grade: C
    EDCE 697 Counseling Internship
    1.00- 5.00 credits
    This course is designed to serve as preparation for entry-level practice by continuing to provide for the development of counseling skills on site and under direct supervision (weekly supervision from an assigned site supervisor). Students continue to gain working knowledge of record keeping, resources, and office protocol. They will regularly observe and receive feedback from the field supervisor and carry a caseload of clients representing the ethnic and demographic diversity of the community. Summer.
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 696 Minimum Grade: C
    EDCE 697A Internship
    5.00 credits
    This course provides a minimum of 300 hours on-site counseling experiences (120 hours of which must be in direct service) under direct supervision for advanced students. Students integrate their personal theory of counseling into practice and function as a full staff member in the school or agency counseling setting, demonstrate professional ethics and standards of care, and demonstrate professional counseling skills, strategies, and techniques.
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 695 Minimum Grade: B- and EDCE 696 Minimum Grade: B-
    EDCE 697B Internship
    5.00 credits
    A second semester continuation of 697A. A further 300 hours of field experience, with 120 hours of direct service is required.
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 697A Minimum Grade: B-
    EDCE 698 Research and Statistics
    4.00 credits
    This course is designed to acquaint students with the language and tools of research and statistics as they serve to inform the counseling practitioner. Students often do not come to this course with a strong background in research and, as a result, have a real fear of this subject area. A specific goal of this course is to make research and statistics a subject with which students become comfortable and find application value in professional practice. Students will review and abstract research articles, present the outcomes of this review at a professional conference, and develop a research proposal. Statistical theory and techniques will be developed in the areas of descriptive statistics (e.g., scales of measurement, distribution, central tendency) and inferential statistics (e.g., variance, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, ANOVA, correlation and regression, chi square). This course requires a minimal math background of basic arithmetic, beginning algebra, use of square roots, and order of operations. Having a personal calculator that adds, subtracts, multiplies, divides, and computes square roots (X2) can be helpful and save time.
    EDCE 699 Comprehensive Oral Examination
    .00 credits
    Permission of Chairperson
    Prerequisite:
    EDCE 697B Minimum Grade: B- or EDCE 685 Minimum Grade: B-
    EDCE 900 Workshop
    1.00- 6.00 credits
     

    In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

    The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

    Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
    Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

    • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
    • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
    • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
    • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
    • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

    Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

    • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
    • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

    Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

    • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
    • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

    Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

    • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

    The Broadening Courses

    • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
    • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
    • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
    • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

    The Designations
    Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

    • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
    • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
    • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

    Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

    All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.