Master of Business Administration (MBA)

The MBA of Choice

Gonzaga’s MBA of Choice offers a comprehensive graduate education for professional management in a dynamic and complex economic environment. The program allows students the opportunity to choose among a large selection of electives to design a curriculum which will best satisfy their individual educational and career goals. The program prepares graduates for leadership roles in business and other organizations. The curriculum provides students opportunities to apply concepts, techniques, and practice in the functional disciplines of business. Students are intellectually challenged and taught to develop an appreciation of human behavior in organizations and the responsibilities facing entrepreneurs and managerial decision-makers.

Degree Requirements

To complete the MBA degree program, thirty-three credit hours of 600-level graduate business administration courses are required beyond the pre-requisite courses. Students are expected to maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.00. Degree requirements consist of 23 credit hours of core courses and 10 hours of graduate-level electives.

For more information visit: www.gonzaga.edu/MBA

Core Courses: 23 credits

MBUS 600 Orientation 0 credit
MBUS 610 Economic Environment of the Firm 2 credits
MBUS 612 Managing People and Performance 2 credits
MBUS 613 Quantitative and Statistical Analysis 3 credits
MBUS 614 Business Ethics 2 credits
MBUS 616 Strategic Management 2 credits
MBUS 624 Finance Theory and Practice 2 credits
MBUS 625 Operations Theory and Practice 2 credits
MBUS 626 Information Systems Theory and Practice 2 credits
MBUS 627 Marketing Theory and Practice 2 credits
MBUS 628 Managerial Accounting 2 credits
MBUS 629 Corporate Financial Reporting 2 credits
Elective Courses (Concentration) 10 credits

Total Credits Required – 33 credits (35 for Project Management Concentration) 

MBA Concentrations

In addition to the MBA of Choice, the Graduate School of Business offers the MBA with concentrations in Finance (nine credits) or Project Management (12 credits).  The MBA concentrations permit a student to tailor coursework to match career and educational goals and interests. The core courses are the same for the concentrations as they are for the MBA of Choice. Instead of 10 hours of electives, however, this program substitutes additional course requirements. These courses are offered on a two year cycle.

Finance Concentration

9 finance credits + 1 general elective/non-finance
Two of the following three courses:
4 credits
MBUS 660 Investments
MBUS 662 Advanced Corporate Finance
MBUS 665 Mergers and Acquisitions
Five credits from the following courses:
MBUS 660 Investments
2 credits
MBUS 662 Advanced Corporate Finance
2 credits
MBUS 665 Mergers and Acquisitions
2 credits
MBUS 683 * Current Issues in Ethics
1 credit
MBUS 689 * Current Issues in Finance
1 credit
MBUS 690 * Current International Issues
 (International Finance Only)
1 credit

*Current issues courses covering different finance topics may be taken multiple times with the approval of your MBA advisor. Additional 600-level elective courses may be offered that count towards the finance concentration – please check with your MBA academic advisor.

Project Management Concentration

Required Project Management Courses (8 credits):
MBUS 670 Foundations of Project Management 3 credits
MBUS 671 Risk Management 1 credit
MBUS 631 Communications Management 1 credit

MBUS 679 Applied Project Management:
                  Simulations, Case Studies & Computer Applications

2 credits
   
Elective Project Management Courses (4 credits): 
Block A (2 credits):  
MBUS 673 Global Project Management
1 credit
MBUS 674 Agile Project Management
1 credit
MBUS 677 Managing Complex Projects
1 credit
MBUS 676 Contract Management and Procurement
1 credit
   
Block B (2 credits):  
MBUS 672 Decision Making for Managers
1 credit
MBUS 675 Quality Management
1 credit
MBUS 633 Team Building Intensive
2 credits
MBUS 697 Internship
1 credit
MBUS 699 Project Management Special Topics
1 credit
MBUS 500 Economic Analysis
3.00 credits
Key micro and macroeconomic models which are critical to the development of modern economics are explored. Analysis includes theories of supply and demand, theory of the firm, pricing, employment, monetary and fiscal policy, and international trade and finance. Fall.
Equivalent:
ECON 103 - Successful completion
MBUS 500T Economic Analysis
3.00 credits
To familiarize the student with the concepts and tools of microeconomics and macroeconomics.
MBUS 501 Review of Statistical Concepts
1.00 credit
The purpose of this course is to review basic statistical concepts, such as descriptive statistics, probability distributions (binomial and normal), sampling distribution, inferences (point estimates and confidence intervals), hypotheses testing (one-sample tests, two-sample tests), Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), as well as simple linear regression analysis. Furthermore, the course will provide students with hands-on experience in using statistical software (MegaStat) to assist in making effective decisions.
MBUS 502 Review of Financial Acct Conc
1.00 credit
The review will begin with business transaction analysis, including both non-accounting and technical accounting treatments, leading to a discussion of the accounting cycle and the resulting major financial statements (income statement and balance sheet). The class will then drill down and examine in more detail accounting for (1) accounts receivable and bad debt expense; (2) inventory and cost of goods sold; (3) property, plant, and equipment, and depreciation expense; (4) current liabilities and accrued expenses; (5) bonds payable and interest expense; and (6) transactions with owners. The class will conclude with a discussion of the statement of cash flows.
MBUS 510T Marketing Analysis
3.00 credits
This course explores the "process of exchange." Class lecture, readings and assignments acquaint students with important marketing concepts that any organization can use to effectively satisfy consumer needs while also achieving internal objectives.
MBUS 520 Financial Management
2.00 credits
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic theoretical foundation and tools to employ in financial decision-making. Of primary importance is provision for the necessary mathematical and analytical methods needed to continue into advanced finance courses. These techniques are commonly encountered by professionals in all areas of business management. Also, the thought process and techniques introduced in this class can be readily applied to everyday personal decision-making situations.
Equivalent:
BFIN 320 - Successful completion
MBUS 520T Financial Analysis
3.00 credits
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic theoretical foundation and tools to employ in financial decision-making. Of primary importance is provision for the necessary mathematical and analytical methods needed to continue into advanced finance courses. These techniques are commonly encountered by professional in all areas of business management. Also, the thought process and techniques introduced in this class can be readily applied to everyday personal decision making situations.
MBUS 560 Accounting Analysis
3.00 credits
This course is intended as an introduction to financial and managerial accounting concepts. Students successfully completing the class will have: a) a general knowledge of accounting concepts and techniques; b) a familiarity with the accounting procedures used to account for most business transactions; c) the ability to prepare basic financial reports; d) an understanding of the uses and limitations of accounting information; e) an understanding of some of the ethical issues in accounting; and f) the ability to provide at least an elemental interpretation of the information contained in a set of financial statements. Spring.
Equivalent:
ACCT 263 - Successful completion
MBUS 560T Accounting Analysis
3.00 credits
Professionals in many disciplines are likely to confront accounting and financial management issues regularly in their careers. This course is intended as an introduction to financial and managerial accounting concepts.
MBUS 590 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Guidelines are available in the Graduate School of Business office. Requirements must be met before registration. Summer.
MBUS 600 Orientation
.00 credits
This zero credit Orientation is held one evening per semester just prior to the start of classes. It must be taken during the student's first semester in either the Master of Accountancy or Master of Business Administration programs. Topics include an orientation to the Graduate School of Business programs, University facilities available to students, team-building, communication skills, and students will receive pertinent information regarding academic honesty, professional standards, and networking. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
MBUS 610 Econ Environment of the Firm
2.00 credits
Managers must understand the nature and objectives of the firm in the economy. This course emphasizes how firms are affected by their market structure and how they interface with society, government and the global economy. Topics are selected from: competitive markets, market imperfections, pricing strategies, game theory, the economic model of human behavior, compensation and incentives, government regulation, fiscal and monetary policy, foreign exchange, and trade policy. Spring.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 613 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 612 Managing People & Performance
2.00 credits
This course focuses on understanding behavioral concepts necessary for the effective management of people in organizations. Current literature, case studies and simulations will be used to demonstrate application of concepts. Topics covered include perception, motivation, leadership, managing teams and conflict, supportive communication, leveraging diversity and performance management. Fall and Spring.
MBUS 613 Quantitative & Stats Analysis
3.00 credits
This course is designed to expose students to the use of spreadsheet-based models and the scientific research process to support problem solving and decision making in a business environment. Basic statistical concepts will be reviewed, such as descriptive statistics, probability distributions, sampling distribution, inferences, hypotheses testing, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), as well as simple linear regression analysis. Students will also gain hands-on experience in using statistical software (MegaStat) to assist in making effective decisions. Emphasis is on the acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of data to solve business problems. Case problems may be used to provide practical experience in data analysis and interpretation. Fall and Spring.
MBUS 614 Business Ethics
2.00 credits
In general, business ethics is the study of ethical concerns that arise in connection with business as it is currently practiced, typically in a capitalist setting. This particular course, given the audience, will focus on a handful of basic points of interest that relate essentially to the business lives of managers, especially entrepreneurial managers.
MBUS 615T Small Business Marketing
3.00 credits
This course presents practical marketing techniques with a strong theoretical basis. Students will acquire an understanding of how marketing techniques may be adapted effectively for efficient use in small business environments. Issues in buyer behavior and marketing research will be discussed.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 510 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 616 Strategic Management
2.00 credits
This is a capstone course designed to apply and integrate concepts and analytical tools that students have studied in their MBA or MAcc coursework. This course adopts a general management perspective to analyze complex business situations, identify critical issues, and develop effective solutions. Consideration is given to ethical dimensions of strategic decision making. The emphasis throughout is on developing strategic thinking skills and understanding the fundamentals for achieving competitive advantage in a dynamic global environment. Completion of the functional core courses required prior to registration and is preferably taken in the student's final semester. Fall and Spring.
MBUS 616T Tribal Strategic Management
1.00 credit
This course adopts a general management perspective to analyze complex business situations, identify critical issues, and develop effective solutions. Consideration is given to ethical dimensions of strategic decision making. The emphasis throughout is on developing strategic thinking skills and understanding the fundamentals for achieving competitive advantage in a dynamic global environment. Completion of the functional core courses required prior to registration and is preferably taken in the student's final semester. Summer.
MBUS 617 Tribal Leadership
1.00 credit
This course offers an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural examination of leadership in tribal communities. It will examine the cultural and business implications of the leadership challenge in tribal economic and political systems by addressing the fundamental questions: What are distinguishing theories and practices of effective tribal leadership that define its cultural acumen in postmodern times? Using critical pedagogical strategies, students will study the history causes, structures and consequences of this notion called "tribal leadership."
MBUS 624 Finance Theory and Practice
2.00 credits
This course is designed to develop students' understanding of financial theory and how it can be applied to financial decisions a business must make. Included are such topics as cost of capital, capital budgeting, capital structure and working capital management. Fall and Spring.
MBUS 625 Operations Theory and Practice
2.00- 3.00 credits
The main purpose of this course is to help graduate business students understand the impact of operations in determining the best strategies for the business as a whole. The course covers the main principles and concepts pertaining to such issues as the development of a manufacturing strategy, order winners and order qualifiers, lean manufacturing/thinking and six sigma, process choice and product profiling, supply chain management, manufacturing planning and control systems (MPC), etc.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 613 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 626 Info Systems Theory and Pract
2.00- 3.00 credits
This course introduces information system theories and explores issues related to managing and using IS functions and resources from a managerial perspective. The course also investigates the overall information resources of an organization and the strategic role of IS in improving/creating competitive advantages. Real world cases that show how companies have put ideas into practice are examined and discussed.
MBUS 627 Marketing Theory and Practice
2.00 credits
The emphasis in this course is on marketing decision-making based upon an evaluation of the market, the product, promotion effort, price, and channels of distribution. The course provides essential knowledge of marketing needed by the modern executive. Fall and Spring.
MBUS 628 Managerial Accounting
2.00 credits
The principal objective of this course is to explain how accounting data can be interpreted and used by managers in planning, organizing, and controlling organizational activities. The basic processes of cost behavior, product costing, and the use of accounting numbers for performance evaluation will be covered. The intent is not to dwell on accounting procedures; however, a basic understanding of financial accounting and organizational procedures will be necessary to fully understand the concepts covered in this course.
MBUS 629 Corporate Financial Reporting
2.00 credits
Corporate financial accounting theory and reporting practice will be studied. The emphasis will be on the analysis and use of corporate financial reports in business decision-making. Ethical dimensions of corporate financial reporting will be considered, as well as more traditional technical topics, which may include receivables, inventory, long-lived assets, investments, leases, pensions, revenue, recognition, fair value measurements, stock option accounting, or financial derivatives.
MBUS 631 Communications Management
1.00 credit
This course introduces verbal and written communication management strategies vital to successful project stakeholder management. An overview of critical communication and conflict resolution issues encountered by project managers and the methods to negotiate and resolve conflict is studied and practiced. Students will learn how to create a communications management plan and identify stakeholders to facilitate timely, effective communications to expedite the decision-making process. Through application, students will learn how to provide clear, concise, and complete communications using the appropriate channels to the right audience to manage negotiations and lead successful domestic and global projects.
MBUS 633 Team Building Intensive
2.00 credits
This course will focus on work group dynamics, the opportunities and threats involved with group work. leadership of small groups, and team training and development. Individuals will complete pre- and post-class assignments. During the class, students engage in exercises, simulations. reflections, and discussions regarding to application of research suggestions in the field of team dynamics .
MBUS 641 Sports Economics
2.00 credits
Explores the economic incentives present in professional and amateur sports. Specifically, the business of sports is examined including: revenue maximization, ticket pricing, league structure, stadium financing, advertising, labor relations/player pay, federal anti-trust exemptions, and Title IX.
MBUS 647T Entrepreneurship
1.00 credit
The primary objective of this course is to give the student an understanding of the entrepreneurial process. This includes: An understanding of the entrepreneur, an analysis of the role of the entrepreneurship in the economy, business plan development, financing concerns, strategic issues. This objective will be accomplished with a special emphasis on the process as it applies to the American Indian community.
MBUS 660 Investments
2.00 credits
This course covers the fundamentals of security valuation and analysis, market efficiency, the scientific evidence surrounding investment strategies, and the relationship between risk and return. Trading mechanics, types of trades, and alternative investment vehicles will be discussed.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 624 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 661 Sustainable Business
1.00 credit
This class includes both the evaluation of financial performance via financial statement and ratio analysis as well as planning for growth and external financial requirements. The derivation of pro-forma statements, cash budgets, and credit analysis and policy, will be covered as will means for evaluating financial alternatives available for meeting a corporation's funding requirements.
MBUS 662 Advanced Corporate Finance
2.00 credits
The course covers both the theoretical background and practical implications of the central issues in corporate financial management, including capital structure decisions, dividend payout decisions, and asset valuation. Real options are considered as an enhancement to traditional capital budgeting methods. Also, issues related to security design are covered.
MBUS 664 Derivatives
1.00 credit
The class focuses on futures, forwards, and options on common stock and foreign currencies. Institutional aspects of derivatives markets, as well as factors influencing the value of these contracts are studied. In option valuation, the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model and the Binomial tree model of option valuation are covered in detail. Various portfolio strategies using combinations of call and put options to exploit investors' expectations of future asset prices are also covered.
MBUS 665 Mergers & Acquisitions
2.00 credits
This class includes coverage of merger types, their characteristics, and motivations for mergers. The market for corporate control will be introduced, as will the agency problem and how it relates to merger activity. Principles of valuation will be applied to takeovers and some examination of merger law, corporate governance reform, and the scholarly research of M & A's will also be included in the course.
MBUS 670 Foundations of Project Mgmt
3.00 credits
Modern organizations rely heavily on project management to ensure that they realize their organizational strategies and objectives. In recent years, project management has increased in visibility and importance, both as a profession and as an organizational priority. Organizations are demanding professionals who can deliver on the promise of project management. This course will introduce the fundamentals of effective traditional and agile project management, present industry standards and best practices, while providing guidance on becoming project management professionals.
MBUS 671 Risk Management
1.00 credit
This course focuses on integrating risk management processes and change management methods as fundamental project management essentials. Using project risk management best practices, students will develop a risk management plan to identify, analyze, and determine risks and their impacts while applying qualitative and quantitative methods to plan, control, and monitor risks and opportunities. Students will plan and respond to change by implementing control processes using change management theories to increase the probability of a successful project.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 670 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 672 Decision Making for Managers
1.00 credit
Decision making is critical for every successful manager. In this course, students will be introduced to various tools and techniques used for problem solving and decision making. Some of the topics to be discussed in this course include: decision making framework. mapping techniques, problems identification tools (such as root cause analysis and theory of constraints), and analytical tools (such as decision tree analysis, optimization techniques, sensitivity & scenario analysis). Being armed with these tools and techniques, current and future managers will be able to analyze a problem and determine the best course of action to resolve it.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 600 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 673 Global Project Management
1.00 credit
This course focuses on global project management and global team management through practical application and international case analyses. The course explores how individuals, groups, and organizations can impact global businesses in areas such as environmental factors, cultural and national differences, outsourcing and third-party contracts, communication and technology barriers, and virtual project management.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 670 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 674 Agile Project Management
1.00 credit
This course examines agile principles and practices and how to successfully blend Agile and traditional project management methodologies in multifaceted projects. Students develop an agile mindset in this course and explore methodologies used for high-risk, shifting requirements, or substantial uncertainty to effectively respond to project changes. Students will learn about DevOps and continuous integration approaches common in IT and high-tech industries.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 670 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 675 Quality Management
1.00 credit
This course introduces students to Project Quality Management (PQM) and the required processes to plan, manage, and control both project and product quality requirements. Quality Management is the discipline of managing quality processes in organizations to limit variation and achieve maximum customer satisfaction at the lowest possible overall cost. The course studies how continuous improvement activities support stakeholders' objectives while identifying quality requirements and/ or standards (plan), translating or breaking down the quality management plan into executable activities (manage), and evaluating the quality management activity results (control).
MBUS 676 Contract Mgmt and Procurement
1.00 credit
This course focuses on the current principles and practices used in managing project procurements and contracts. The course studies types of contracts; contract terms and conditions; local, national, and international contract laws; procurement management plan; state of work (SOW); request for proposal (RFP); and ethical and moral issues.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 670 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 677 Managing Complex Projects
1.00 credit
In this course students will study the aspects contributing to a project's complexity, risk, and uncertainty. Students will learn and apply techniques to create a realistic action plan to begin a complex project and keep it on-track. Students will understand that large, complex projects involving hundreds of resources require tools and approaches that scale up to be successful.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 670 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 679 Applied Project Management
3.00 credits
This capstone course provides an opportunity for students to apply the project management skills acquired in the MBA PM concentration. The course focuses on applying project management theories in leadership, team building, group dynamics, decision making, communication, contracts, and negotiation. Students will use actual workplace project scenarios with a project management information system (PMIS) to initiate a project and evaluate project processes through a project life cycle-from inception to completion-while managing deadlines, administering communications, reporting performance results, and generating deliverables. Students will study project management case studies and participate in simulations in order to apply project management principles and methodologies to critically analyze real-world project management.
Prerequisite:
MBUS 670 Minimum Grade: C
MBUS 680 Current Issues in Operations
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Operations. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to: logistics, supply chain management, process flow, project management, quality and operational research methods. The subject of Current Issues in Operations will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 681 Current Iss in Info Systems
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Information Systems. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to: the use of systems in decision making, information systems design, the use of data in organizations, and e-commerce and information tools. The subject of Current Issues in Information Systems will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 682 Current Iss in Mangerial Acct
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Managerial Accounting. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to: accounting decision-making tools, the accounting behavior of organizations, forensic accounting, and the communication of accounting information. The subject of Current Issues in Managerial Accounting will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 683 Current Issues in Ethics
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Ethics. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to; ethical decision-making, the application of ethics in disciplinary or cultural contexts, and case studies in ethical and unethical business practices. The subject of Current Issues in Ethics will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 683T Legal Enviroment:Indian Cntry
2.00 credits
This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of the legal environment within which business operates. The course will cover the historical and cultural development of law, as well as practical applications to current business issues. Although the readings will be highlighted in class, students will bear the major responsibility for text assignments. Classroom discussions should focus more on specific legal issues involving doing business on Indian reservations.
MBUS 684 Current Issues in Marketing
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Marketing. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to; buyer behavior, new product promotion, advertising, digital media, creativity, and marketing communications. The subject of Current Issues in Marketing will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 685 Current Iss in Fin Reporting
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Financial Reporting. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to: the use of financial reporting systems, communication of financial data to stakeholders, and financial strategy. The subject of Current Issues in Financial Reporting will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 686 Current Iss in Management
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Management. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to: strategic decision-making, human resources, performance appraisal, negotiations, organizational effectiveness. and conflict resolution. The subject of Current Issues in Management will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 687 Current Iss: Entrepreneurship
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Entrepreneurship. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to; idea development and appraisal, entrepreneurial decision-making, new venture strategy, sales, small business management, and not-for-profit organizational development. The subject of Current Issues in Entrepreneurship will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 688 Current Issues in Economics
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Economics. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to: emerging economies, global markets, economic analysis, economic behavior, and economic models of industries and cultures. The subject of Current Issues in Economics will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 689 Current Issues in Finance
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of Finance. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to; real estate, investments, financial markets, the use of financial modelling tools, valuation, and the role of risk. The subject of Current Issues in Finance will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 690 Current International Issues
1.00 credit
This course will address a variety of topics related to the subject of International Business. Subjects may include, but will not be limited to: international markets, the impact of government and culture on business, doing business internationally, global logistics, international finance, and ethical decision making in a global economy. The subject of Current International Issues will vary between the Fall and Spring semesters of each year.
MBUS 691 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
MBUS 694 Team Building Intensive
2.00 credits
This intensive, 2-credit course combines the highly interactive, challenge activities and in-class and outside assignments. Summer.
MBUS 695 Small Business Consulting
1.00- 3.00 credits
Practicum in providing management assistance to small business and nonprofit organizations in marketing, management, finance, accounting, information systems, operations, and related business areas. Student teams will meet with clients and develop a proposal outlining specific objectives and expected outcomes to be achieved. A final written report will be presented to the client outlining their analyses and recommendations along with implementation strategies. The course will also examine the management of the consulting process, and the role of the consultant as an agent for organization change.
MBUS 697 Internship
1.00- 3.00 credits
Relevant work experience is required that is commensurate with a student's professional interests. Guidelines and criteria are available from the School of Business Administration Internship Director.
MBUS 698 Research Project
1.00- 3.00 credits
Research guidelines are available in the School of Business Administration Office. Research Project requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
MBUS 699 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
These seminars cover topics of importance to business professionals. This course may be repeated for credit with a change in subject matter.
MBUS 699T Tribal Seminar Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
This course will bring Native American Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders together in the summer to meet with and talk about the issues in tribal business and learn about their successes and obstacles.
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.