Mechanical Engineering

Chairperson: Dr. Massimo "Max" Capobianchi
Professors: K. Ansari, M. Capobianchi, P. Ferro, G. Hordemann (Emeritus)
Associate Professors: T. Chen, J. Marciniak
Assistant Professors: M. Baumgardner, T. Fitzgerald
Lecturer: A. Delane, J. Weston

Mechanical Engineering is that branch of engineering that encompasses the study of forces, motion, energy, materials, manufacturing, and design in order to apply them to the creation of mechanical devices and systems that serve society (e.g., engines, refrigerators, machines, tools, etc). This is accomplished through a process of problem description, creative idea generation, design, analysis, judgment, planning, and production that typically involves a host of professionals who may all have been educated as mechanical engineers. For example, mechanical engineers may be involved in product design, analysis, and testing, in developing manufacturing processes, in defining product requirements and trouble-shooting customer problems, in project management, and in research and education.

The profession serves many diverse fields and industries such as the aerospace, pharmaceutical, automotive, biomedical engineering, and power generation industries, to name just a few. In fact, any device or system that involves energy or movement probably involved one or more mechanical engineers in its creation. Some exciting, rapidly developing fields and emerging technologies of interest to mechanical engineers include fuel cells (the use of chemical fuel and an oxidant to directly produce electricity), rapid prototyping (the use of computer-controlled machines to fabricate complete objects in one step directly from computer models), mechatronics (the integration of mechanical systems and electronic sensing and control), biomedical engineering (the application of engineering to problems in medicine and biology), nanoengineering (the creation of materials and devices at the nanometer level, i.e., at the atomic, molecular, or supramolecular levels), and MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems-the integration of mechanical, chemical, and/or electronic systems at the chip level).

The Department of Mechanical Engineering at Gonzaga University develops men and women who are both competent engineers and educated, responsible human beings. The development of these two characteristics in students is affected by course work from both the liberal arts and the profession. Thus, these two aspects are interwoven, being a single, integrated fabric having many threads contributed by many curricula. This synthesis is expressed by the engineering program educational objectives that are listed in the School of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog, and by the Gonzaga University Mission Statement that may be found at the beginning of the catalog.

Diversity of opportunity and professional breadth are hallmarks of the mechanical engineering profession. This translates into a need for a thorough grounding in a variety of mathematical, scientific, and engineering fundamentals. Thus, the Mechanical Engineering Program at Gonzaga University prepares the student in the areas of mathematics, chemistry, physics, mechanics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, materials, manufacturing, design, control theory, experimentation, and economics. These fundamentals are enhanced with exposure to important engineering tools such as: mathematical techniques; computer programming; computer applications including computer aided design (CAD), computer aided manufacturing (CAM), finite element analysis (FEA), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD); and the use of equipment, instruments, and software typically found in manufacturing and laboratory situations. Since teamwork is an essential aspect of the modern practice of mechanical engineering, the Mechanical Engineering Program gives considerable attention to building personal communication skills through team design projects, reports, and presentations. Furthermore, as a critical component of the program, all students engage in design courses beginning in their Sophomore year, culminating in a two-semester capstone design experience in the Senior year. That experience entails requiring student design teams, led jointly by faculty and practicing engineers, to solve real industrial design problems. Finally, the degree requirements also include the opportunity for breadth as well as concentration in particular engineering applications through a group of technical electives taken in the senior year (the list of allowed technical electives is given below). The department also has a five-year plan available for students wishing to proceed at a slower pace or for those planning to add a minor in business or in a liberal arts subject such as physics, music, or art. Information and a suggested course package is also available for students planning to enroll in the Gonzaga-in-Florence Engineering Semester program.

The following curriculum details the course requirements for each semester. In addition to these courses, all students must take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination prior to graduation (see ENSC 400, “Fundamentals of Engineering Exam” course in the Spring semester of the Senior year). Finally, students who follow a curriculum sequence other than that listed below should meet with their Academic Advisors at their first opportunity in order to resolve any scheduling conflicts that may arise due to off-schedule course availability and/or course pre- and co-requisite structure. In all cases, students must comply with the pre- and co-requisite requirements in order to be granted admission into courses.

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering: 138 credits


(1) ENSC 300 is waived under the following circumstances:
  • Students enrolled in the Hogan Entrepreneurial Leadership program: ENSC 300 is waived.
    Students pursuing the General Business or Analytical Finance minor:
    ENSC 300 is waived after completing both (ECON 200 or (ECON 201 and ECON 202)) and BFIN 320
  • Students Pursuing the B.S. in Engineering and M.B.A. program: ENSC 300 is waived after completing both (ECON 200 or (ECON 201 and Econ 202)) and BFIN 320.

The above courses are not intended to be options for the ENSC 300 course. Hence, students who are not in one of the above programs are required to take ENSC 300. Also, students who comply with one of the above criteria must complete all of the courses required to waive ENSC 300 prior to enrolling in any course for which ENSC 300 is a pre-requisite.

(2) Students must show proof of final registration with the State of Washington for the Fundamentals of Engineering examination, or proof of having taken the examination in the State of Washington, as part of the requirements of this course.

Technical Electives

The courses used to satisfy the technical elective requirements must normally be selected from the following list. However, students may take other courses for technical elective credits but only with the prior approval of both the student’s academic advisor and the chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The actual technical elective courses offered from the list below varies from year to year and the department may on occasion offer one or more pre-approved technical elective courses that are not listed below. Courses other than MENG courses may have pre and/or co- requisites that are outside of the normal mechanical engineering curriculum. Students wishing to take these courses should plan well in advance in order to comply with all admission requirements prior to enrolling in the course.

  • MENG 435 Applications in Vibrations
  • MENG 442 Advanced Heat Transfer
  • MENG 445 Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning
  • MENG 447 Advanced Energy Systems
  • MENG 450 Topics in Machine Design
  • MENG 456 Design for Manufacturing
  • MENG 465 Introduction to Finite Elements
  • MENG 467 Designing with Polymers and Composites
  • MENG 477 Material Selection for Design
  • MENG 480 Advanced Fluid Mechanics
  • MENG 484 Manufacturing Systems
  • CENG 301 Structural Analysis I
  • CENG 390 Structural Analysis II
  • ENSC 405 Engineering Project Management
  • EENG 412 Digital Control Systems
  • ENSC 413 Automation
  • PHYS 307 Optics
    PHYS 402 Advanced Mechanics
    PHYS 450 Statistical Physics
Lower Division
MENG 221 Materials Engineering
3.00 credits
Introduction to the structure-property-processing relationship in metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials, and to the atomic structure of materials and its influence on mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Students explore how alloying and thermomechanical processing modifies structure and changes the properties of materials.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: D or TRAN GCHM Minimum Grade: T
MENG 291 Intro to Mech Eng Design
2.00 credits
Introduction to mechanical engineering design, with emphasis on the creation and communication of design ideas. Students will learn construction geometry, visualization (orthographic views, isometric views, sectional views, etc.), hand sketching and drawing of initial designs, and how to create 2-D drawings. Detailed treatment of dimensioning and tolerancing. Strong focus on the design of basic machine elements in order to prepare the student for further coursework in machine design, and senior projects, as well as direct application in the practice of mechanical engineering. The design process, including business letters, proposals, product specifications, product descriptions, prototype fabrication, and product descriptions will be introduced.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 192 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
MENG 291L
MENG 291L Intro to Mech Eng Design Lab
1.00 credit
Hands on use of SOLIDWORKS CAD system to create 3-D models and 2-D drawings of machinery elements and assemblies. Laboratory assignments are coordinated with lecture content from MENG 291. Student projects will focus on the creation of machinery elements and assemblies in a team environment.
Concurrent:
MENG 291
Upper Division
MENG 301 Manufacturing Processes
2.00 credits
Overview of manufacturing processes and how they influence design decisions. Emphasizes design for manufacturability, process comparison, and process specification.
Prerequisite:
MENG 221 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
MENG 301L
MENG 301L Manufacturing Processes Lab
1.00 credit
Laboratory experiences with machine tools and manufacturing processes. Calculations and problem solving that reinforce lecture topics.
Concurrent:
MENG 301
MENG 321 Thermodynamics I
3.00 credits
The first and second laws of thermodynamics; thermophysical properties of matter, ideal gases and their mixtures; concept of entropy as applied to thermal systems.
Prerequisite:
MATH 259 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 322 Thermodynamics II
3.00 credits
Second Law analysis, power and refrigeration cycles, mixtures, combustion, and high speed flow. Applications of first and second law analysis to engineering systems.
Prerequisite:
MENG 321 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 330 Machine Design
3.00 credits
Application of stress analysis and theories of failure to basic machine elements. Design of elements under static and fatigue loading. Design involving mechanical elements such as shafts, columns, flywheels, springs, and welds.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 301 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 341 Heat Transfer
3.00 credits
One and multidimensional steady conduction, transient conduction, internal and external forced convection, natural convection, radiation heat transfer, boiling and condensation, heat exchangers.
Prerequisite:
MENG 321 Minimum Grade: D and ENSC 352 Minimum Grade: D and MATH 260 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 411 Instrumentation Systems
3.00 credits
Basic concepts of measurement and analysis of measurement uncertainties and experimental data. Study of transducers and investigation of data acquisition, signal conditioning, and data processing hardware typically utilized in performing mechanical measurements.
Prerequisite:
EENG 201 Minimum Grade: D and ENSC 371 Minimum Grade: D and MATH 321 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
MENG 411L
MENG 411L Instrumentation Systems Lab
1.00 credit
Laboratory exercises supporting the topics covered in MENG 411.
Concurrent:
MENG 411
MENG 412 Mechanical Measurements
3.00 credits
Study of the techniques used for measuring displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, pressure, flow, temperature, and strain. Investigation of the proper application and the associated limitations of the techniques and of the required instruments. The topics are studied within the context of obtaining experimental solutions to engineering problems in thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, mechanics, and strength of materials.
Prerequisite:
MENG 411 Minimum Grade: D and MENG 341 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
MENG 412L
MENG 412L Mechanical Measurements Lab
1.00 credit
Laboratory exercises supporting the topics covered in MENG 412.
Concurrent:
MENG 412
MENG 434 Vibration Engineering
3.00 credits
Elements of vibrating systems. Free, forced harmonic and transient vibrations of single-degree-of-freedom systems with and without damping. Vibration isolation and control. Two-degree-of-freedom systems. Application of matrix techniques.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 306 Minimum Grade: D and ENSC 371 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 435 Applications in Vibrations
3.00 credits
Continuation of MENG 434. Practical applications of vibration theory to topics such as: Control and suppression of vibrations in machinery; vibration isolation and damping treatments; dynamic vibration absorbers; balancing of rotating and reciprocating machinery; critical speed evaluation of flexible rotors; ground vehicle response to road profile excitation and evaluation of ride performance; vibration in electronic equipment and prevention of vibration failures; aircraft vibration and flutter; and response of structures to earthquakes.
Prerequisite:
MENG 434 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 442 Advanced Heat Transfer
3.00 credits
Advanced topics in conduction, contact resistance, multidimensional transients, periodic heat transfer, non-uniform heat generation, phase change heat transfer, fin heat transfer, and design of shell-and-tube heat exchangers.
Prerequisite:
MENG 341 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 445 Heating Vent and Air Condition
3.00 credits
Introduction to the techniques used in the analysis and design of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Topics include the arrangement of typical air conditioning systems (i.e. all air systems, air and water systems, etc.), moist air processes, comfort and health criteria for indoor air quality, heating and cooling loads, piping system design, building air distribution, and operational principles and performance parameters of typical components (i.e., cooling towers, air washers, heating and cooling coils, etc.)
Prerequisite:
MENG 341 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 447 Advanced Energy Systems
3.00 credits
This course is designed for students to understand the basic engineering principles of clean, renewable, and advanced energy conversion technologies. This course features an overview of various energy sources, their characteristics, and in-depth coverage of engineering technologies of converting these sources to electricity. Students should understand the engineering principles and limitations of each energy conversion technology. They will gain the ability to choose appropriate energy conversion techniques based on the application and energy resource availability.
Prerequisite:
MENG 322 Minimum Grade: D and MENG 341 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 450 Topics in Machine Design
3.00 credits
Continuation of material presented in MENG 330. Design topics involving mechanical elements such as bolts, spur and helical gears, journal bearings and flexible mechanical elements.
Prerequisite:
MENG 330 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 456 Design for Manufacturing
3.00 credits
Principles of Design for Manufacturing (DFM) are taught in the context of manufacturing engineering. Tool design, part features, tolerances and material processing parameters are discussed as examples to demonstrate how overall manufacturing costs are affected. Communication within the supply chain, upstream and downstream, are emphasized to achieve design and manufacturing costs goals. Traditional and nontraditional manufacturing (e.g. additive manufacturing) examples are used to show how DFM principles may be employed in globalized manufacturing. Recommendations from Bralla, Design for Manufacturing, are covered. Value engineering, outsourcing, reshoring, maquiladoras and other manufacturing trends are discussed.
Prerequisite:
MENG 221 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 461 System Dynamics and Control
3.00 credits
Principles of feedback control. Mathematical modeling and analysis of dynamic physical elements and systems. Transient and steady-state response of first and second-order systems. Use of Laplace transforms. System response with zeros and additional poles. Transfer functions and block diagrams. Stability criteria and steady-state errors. Root locus and frequency response methods.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 306 Minimum Grade: D and ENSC 371 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 465 Introduction to Finite Element
3.00 credits
Development of the stiffness matrix method applied to bar and beam elements. The plane problem is discussed and plane elements are presented. The Isoperimetric formulation is introduced. Modeling and accuracy in linear analysis is considered. Utilizes a commercial finite element program in problem solving. One hour lecture and two hour computer Laboratory each week.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 301 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 467 Design w/Polymers-Composites
3.00 credits
Background of composites, stress-strain relations for composite materials, extension and bending of symmetric laminates, failure analysis of fiber-reinforced materials, design examples and design studies, non-symmetric laminates, micromechanics of composites, properties of fibers and matrix materials.
Prerequisite:
MENG 221 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 477 Materials Selection for Design
3.00 credits
Methods of materials selection. Systematic approaches for selecting optimal material when competing criteria exist. Real applications and case studies are included. Several topics including fracture mechanics, corrosion, titanium alloys, etc. are covered.
Prerequisite:
MENG 221 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 480 Advanced Fluid Mechanics
3.00 credits
Ideal fluid flow. Laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows, conservation equations, and solution methods. Turbo machinery. Unsteady flow problems. Basic computational fluid mechanics.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 352 Minimum Grade: D
MENG 484 Manufacturing Systems
3.00 credits
A course designed to familiarize the student with manufacturing decisions required in the industrial sector. Developing manufacturing strategies, integrating process alternatives, equipment selection analysis, process costs, and total integration of manufacturing systems are assessed quantitatively and qualitatively to maximize outcomes. Supply chain and lean topics are covered.
Prerequisite:
MENG 301 Minimum Grade: D
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.