Engineering Science

Assistant Professor: B. Dorie
 
The following Engineering Science courses are service courses for all majors within the School of Engineering and Applied Science:
Lower Division
ENSC 191 First Year Seminar
3.00 credits
An introduction to multiple aspects of engineering as well as the university intellectual life. A primary focus is on programming and the use of computers within the engineering disciplines. Through a focus on hands-on projects performed in teams, the course introduces students to commonalities and differences among the engineering disciplines, modes of inquiry, project design, teaming, skills in professional/technical writing, persuasive arguments (based on evidence, logic and critical thinking), innovation, and the use of multiple languages (English, computing, graphic) to communicate technical ideas to colleagues and clients. Fall.
Concurrent:
ENSC 191L
ENSC 191L First Year Seminar Lab
.00 credits
See ENSC 191.
Concurrent:
ENSC 191
ENSC 192 First Year Seminar
3.00 credits
A continuation of the concepts introduced in ENSC 191. Spring.
Concurrent:
ENSC 192L
ENSC 192L First Year Seminar Lab
.00 credits
See ENSC 192.
Concurrent:
ENSC 192
ENSC 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
ENSC 205 Statics
3.00 credits
A vector treatment of systems of forces and moments in equilibrium. Topics include centroids, distributed loads, effects of friction; analysis of trusses and frames and calculations of moments of inertia. PHYS 103 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 103 Minimum Grade: D
ENSC 244 Computer Methods for Engineers
3.00 credits
Course developing facility in the solution of engineering problems by numerical methods using digital computers. A practical treatment of the computational tools for solving linear and non-linear algebraic equations, and ordinary differential equations. Techniques of numerical differentiation, integration, regression analysis, and interpolation. Use of mathematics computer software.
Prerequisite:
MATH 260 Minimum Grade: D
ENSC 290 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Upper Division
ENSC 300 Engineering Economics
2.00 credits
Techniques of evaluating engineering decisions in the economic realm. Selected topics include: annual cost, present worth, future worth, rate of return, and benefit cost ratio analysis in engineering project alternatives.
Prerequisite:
MATH 258 Minimum Grade: D
ENSC 301 Mechanics of Materials I
3.00 credits
Behavior of materials, elementary theories of stress and strain, generalization of these theories to stress distribution, and deformation and instability in structural members.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 205 Minimum Grade: D
ENSC 306 Dynamics
3.00 credits
A vector treatment of kinematics and kinetics. General motion of a particle, energy and momentum methods for particles and rigid bodies.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 205 Minimum Grade: D
ENSC 352 Fluid Mechanics
3.00 credits
Fluid properties, fluid statics, fluids in motion, momentum and energy equations, dimensional analysis, boundary layers, flow in conduits, drag and lift.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 205 Minimum Grade: D
ENSC 355 Thermal Science
3.00 credits
First and second law of thermodynamics applied to closed and open systems; introduction to conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer. For non-mechanical engineering majors only.
ENSC 371 Advanced Engineering Math
3.00 credits
Application of advanced mathematical techniques to problems of interest to engineers and scientists. Analytical methods involving topics such as ordinary and partial differential equations, special functions, and complex valued functions.
Prerequisite:
MATH 260 Minimum Grade: D
ENSC 400 Fund of Engineering Exam
.00 credits
Proctoring of the practice examination for Students in preparation for the Fundamental of Engineering Exam (1st exam toward professional licensing), and of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences assessment surveys (dates and times are announced during the semester). Also requires Students to take the Washington State Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Examination. Students must show proof of having taken the examination as part of the requirements of this course.
Prerequisite:
EENG 491 Minimum Grade: D or MENG 491 Minimum Grade: D or ENSC 491 Minimum Grade: D or CENG 491 Minimum Grade: D or CPSC 491 Minimum Grade: D
ENSC 405 Engineering Project Management
3.00 credits
Current tools used to manage engineering and technical projects. Topics covering both theory and practice: Definition of a project; Management and organization; Project planning, including chartering, project scope management, project time (schedule) management, project cost management, quality management, communications, project risk management, and procurement/contract management; Project control; and Project completion/termination.
ENSC 413 Automation
2.00 credits
Use of programmable controllers to automate manufacturing processes and equipment. Ladder logic and state based control languages. Controller architecture and system software. Structured design using Grafcet. Interactive graphic operator interface design. Safety considerations. Sensors and instrumentation. Single Loop Controllers
Prerequisite:
ENSC 244 Minimum Grade: D and (EENG 411 Minimum Grade: D or MENG 461 Minimum Grade: D)
ENSC 413L Automation Lab
1.00 credit
Must be taken concurrently with ENSC 413. Three hour lab per week.
ENSC 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
ENSC 481 Special Topics in Engineering
1.00- 6.00 credits
Special topics in engineering. Admission is based on satisfying any specified pre-requisite, co-requisite and/or restrictions particular to that special topic course. Fall and Spring.
ENSC 482 Special Topics
1.00- 6.00 credits
Special topics in engineering. Admission is based on satisfying any specified pre-requisite, co-requisite and/or restrictions particular to that special topic course. Fall and Spring.
ENSC 483 Independent Study in Engineer
1.00- 3.00 credits
Admission is based on evidence of ability to pursue independent study in depth and approval of a submitted project in engineering science. Prerequisite: permission of Department Chair and Dean. Fall and Spring.
ENSC 484 Independent Study in Engineer
1.00- 3.00 credits
Admission is based on evidence of ability to pursue independent study in depth and approval of a submitted project in engineering science. Prerequisite: permission of Department Chair and Dean. Fall and Spring.
ENSC 490 Directed Study
.00- 3.00 credits
Directed study of a specific topic in engineering. Admission is based on satisfying any specified pre-requisite, co-requisite and/or restrictions particular to that topic in this course. Fall and Spring.
ENSC 491 Senior Design Project I
2.00 credits
Elective senior design project of an interdisciplinary or specialized nature involving both technical and non-technical aspects of an engineering problem for students in any of the engineering majors. Fall.
ENSC 492 Senior Design Project II
3.00 credits
Ongoing completion of an elective senior design project of an interdisciplinary or specialized nature involving both technical and non-technical aspects of an engineering problem for students in any of the engineering majors. Spring.
Prerequisite:
ENSC 491 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
ENSC 400
ENSC 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.