Military Science

Chairperson: Major Edward Adams, Professor of Military Science
Assistant Professors:
Dr. Alan Westfield, Mr. Dan Sheahan, Captain Jason Baggott; Sergeant First Class Dennis Quirk, Sergeant First Class Arthur Thorness

The Military Science program at Gonzaga University is an element of the United States Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). This highly decorated and nationally recognized program is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Army, Gonzaga University, and Whitworth University. It provides training and qualification for leadership positions in the Regular Army, the U.S. Army Reserve, or the Army National Guard. Qualified students earn a commission as an Army Second Lieutenant while achieving a college degree in the academic discipline(s) of their choosing. Cadets incur no obligation during their first two years of ROTC and are not members of the U.S. Army (unless they are ROTC scholarship winners). Lower-division courses are open to all Gonzaga students.

The objectives of the program are to prepare academically and physically qualified scholar/athlete/leaders for the challenge of serving as commissioned officers in the world’s best Army. To that end, the program strives to build leaders of character and competence to serve their country and community.

Description of the Program

The program meets the country’s requirement for officer-leaders in the Army (active duty, National Guard, and Reserves). It is, therefore, multifaceted, with distinctive sub-elements to meet individual needs and requirements. For example, ROTC is traditionally a four-year program, but individuals with prior service, members of Reserve or National Guard units, participants of JROTC in high school and summer Cadet Initial Entry Training (CIET) participants may receive advanced-placement credit and may complete the program in two years. Students enroll in one military science class, leadership laboratory and the military physical fitness course per semester. The program consists of two phases: the basic course (lower division), normally taken during the freshman and sophomore years or completed through advanced-placement credit, and the advanced course (upper division).

Basic Course

First-year and second-year courses, MILS 101, MILS 102, MILS 201, and MILS 202 are designed for beginning students who want to qualify for entry into the advanced course and for those students who may want to try military science without obligations. In addition to their academic requirements, basic-course cadets may participate in a variety of extracurricular activities. Placement credit for the basic course may be granted to students who have completed initial entry training for the armed forces, three years of Junior ROTC in high school or the ROTC Leaders’ Training Course. MILS 101 and MILS 102 concentrate on fundamental skills, concepts, values, and problem solving and provide an overview of how the military fits into society. MILS 201 and MILS 202 more thoroughly address problem solving, critical thinking, communications, conflict-resolution skills and leadership.

Advanced Course

The advanced course consists of MILS 301, MILS 302, MILS 401, and MILS 402. It is open only to students who have completed the basic course or earned placement credit (see above). Students must also enroll in leadership labs (MILS 301L, MILS 302L, MILS 401L, or MILS 402L) and Military Physical Fitness (MILS 303, MILS 304, MILS 403, or MILS 404). Students also attend the four-week ROTC Cadet Leader Course (CLC) during the summer between their junior and senior years. In addition to their academic requirements, advanced-course cadets provide student leadership for the Gonzaga Bulldog Battalion.

Completion of the basic course, advanced course, and CLC, coupled with a bachelor’s degree from the college, qualify the cadet for a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army.

Financial Assistance

Advanced-course students receive a subsistence allowance. Junior cadets receive $450 a month for up to ten months and senior cadets receive $500 a month for ten months. Freshman and sophomore cadets who are on scholarship and contracted will receive $300 and $350 a month, respectively, for ten months each year.
Scholarships: Freshman-level and sophomore-level students may compete for Army ROTC campus-based scholarships. These scholarships are applied to tuition and fees plus an allowance for books. A student need not be enrolled in ROTC to be eligible to compete for two-year or three-year scholarships. No commitment is made until a scholarship is accepted, the student meets all administrative and physical criteria, and the oath for contracting is administered. High school seniors interested in applying for a four-year scholarship normally submit applications by January 1st of their senior year.

Fees, Uniforms, and ROTC Texts:

There are no fees for any classes. Uniforms, texts, and other equipment are furnished without charge. Students are responsible for and must return all government property issued to them.

Extracurricular Activities

Color Guard: The Gonzaga University Color Guard participates in a variety of school and civic functions where precision drill or presentation of the U.S. flag is appropriate.
Intramural Sports:
The ROTC program sponsors teams that participate in flag football, volleyball, basketball, softball and other sports of the Gonzaga University intramural leagues. The program sponsors special event teams at both Gonzaga and Whitworth and sponsors cadet intramural teams as coordinated by the Gonzaga cadets with the professor of Military Science.
Special Qualification Training:
Advanced-course and select basic-course cadets may participate in confidence-building courses such as Air Assault School, Airborne School, Northern Warfare Training Center, and Cadet Troop Leadership Training at locations around the world.

Lower Division
MILS 101 Intro to Army & Critical Think
3.00 credits
MIL S 101 introduces you to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership and communication. You will learn how the personal development of life skills such as cultural understanding, goal setting, time management, stress management, and comprehensive fitness relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. Learn fundamental concepts of leadership in a profession in both classroom and outdoor laboratory environments. Weekly requirements: up to three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MILS 101L, plus required participation in a minimum of three one hour sessions for physical fitness. Participation in one off-campus exercises (mandatory). Purchasing an annual Washington State Park Discover Pass for this class is highly encouraged. Passes are $33 per year. http://www.discoverpass.wa.gov.
Concurrent:
MILS 101L
MILS 101L Leadership Laboratory
1.00 credit
Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science course. Learn and practice basic skills. Gain insight into advanced course in order to make an informed decision whether to apply for it. Build self-confidence and team-building leadership skills that can be applied throughout life. Purchasing an annual Washington State Park Discover Pass for this class is highly encouraged. Passes are $33 per year. http://www.discoverpass.wa.gov.
MILS 102 Intro Ldrshp & Critical Think
3.00 credits
Learn/apply principles of effective leadership. Reinforce self-confidence through participation in physically and mentally challenging exercises with upper division ROTC students. Develop communication skills to improve individual performance and group interaction. Relate organizational ethical values to the effectiveness of a leader. Weekly requirements: up to three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MILS 102L, plus required participation in three one hour sessions for physical fitness. Participation in one off-campus exercise (mandatory).
MILS 102L Leadership Laboratory
1.00 credit
MILS 103 Military Physical Fitness Prog
1.00 credit
Intensive military physical fitness program designed to raise the level of individual physical fitness to its highest potential with emphasis on the development of an individual fitness program and the role of exercise and fitness in one's life. Participate in and learn to lead a physical fitness program.
MILS 104 Military Physical Fitness
1.00 credit
MILS 190 Directed Reading
.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
MILS 191 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
MILS 201 Leadership & Decision Making
3.00 credits
Learn/apply ethics-based leadership skills that develop individual abilities and contribution to the building of effective teams. Develop skills in oral presentations, writing concisely, planning events, coordination of group efforts, advanced first aid, land navigation and basic military tactics. Learn fundamentals of ROTC's Leadership Development Program. Weekly requirement up to three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MILS 201L, plus required participation in a minimum of three one hour sessions for physical fitness. Participation in several off-campus (mandatory) exercises. Purchasing an annual Washington State Park Discover Pass for this class is highly encouraged. Passes are $33 per year. http://www.discoverpass.wa.gov.
Concurrent:
MILS 201L
MILS 201L Leadership Lab
1.00 credit
Purchasing an annual Washington State Park Discover Pass for this class is highly encouraged. Passes are $33 per year. http://www.discoverpass.wa.gov.
MILS 202 Army Doctrine & Team Dvlpmnt
3.00 credits
Introduction to individual and team aspects of military tactics in small unit operations. Includes use of radio communications, making safety assessments, movement techniques, planning for team safety/security and methods of pre-execution checks. Practical exercises with upper division ROTC students. Learn techniques for training others as an aspect of continued leadership development. Weekly requirements: up to three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MILS 202L, plus required participation in a minimum of three one hour sessions for physical fitness. Participation in several off-campus exercises (mandatory).
MILS 202L Leadership Lab
1.00 credit
MILS 203 Mil Phys Fitness Program
1.00 credit
MILS 204 Military Physical Fitness
1.00 credit
MILS 290 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
MILS 291 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
Prerequisite:
MILS 201 Minimum Grade: D or MILS 290 Minimum Grade: D
Upper Division
MILS 300 Ranger Challenge
1.00 credit
Must be enrolled in Military Science Basic or Advanced Class.
MILS 301 Train Mgmt & Warfight Function
3.00 credits
Series of practical opportunities to lead small groups, receive personal assessments and encouragement, and lead in situations of increasing complexity. Use small unit tactics and opportunities to plan and conduct training for lower division students both to develop such skills and as vehicles for practicing leadership. Weekly requirements: up to three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MILS 301L, plus required participation in a minimum of three one hour sessions for physical fitness. Purchasing an annual Washington State Park Discover Pass for this class is highly encouraged. Passes are $33 per year. http://www.discoverpass.wa.gov.
Concurrent:
MILS 301L
MILS 301L Leadership Laboratory
1.00 credit
Open only to students in the associated Military Science course. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training and activities with Basic Course students and of the ROTC program as a whole. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions. Purchasing an annual Washington State Park Discover Pass for this class is highly encouraged. Passes are $33 per year. http://www.discoverpass.wa.gov.
MILS 302 App Ldrshp in Small Unit Oper
3.00 credits
Continues methodology of MILS 301. Analyze tasks; prepare written or oral guidance for team members to accomplish tasks. Delegate tasks and supervise. Plan for and adapt to the unexpected in organizations under stress. Examine and apply lessons from leadership case studies. Examine the importance of ethical decision making in setting a positive climate that enhances team performance. Weekly requirements up to three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MILS 301L, plus required participation in a minimum of three one hour sessions for physical fitness.
MILS 302L Leadership Laboratory
1.00 credit
MILS 303 Military Phys Fitness Program
1.00 credit
Open only to (and required of) students in MILS 301, 302, 401, 402, of which this program is an integral part. Participate in planning and leading physical fitness programs. Develop the physical fitness required of an officer in the Army. Emphasis on the development of an individual fitness program and the role of exercise and fitness in one's life.
MILS 304 Military Physical Fitness
1.00 credit
MILS 390 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
MILS 391 Directed Reading
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
Prerequisite:
MILS 301 Minimum Grade: D or MILS 390 Minimum Grade: D
MILS 395 Advanced Camp
3.00 credits
A four-week leadership practicum conducted at an Active Army installation. Only open to (and required of) students who have completed MILS 301 and 302. The student receives pay, travel, lodging and most meal costs are defrayed by the U.S. Army. The Advanced Campu environment is highly structured and demanding, stressing leadership at small unit level under varying, challenging conditions. Individual leadership and basic skills performance are evaluated throughout the camp. Although this course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only, the leadership and skills evaluations at the camp weigh heavily in the subsequent selection process that determines the type commission and job opportunities given to the student upon graduation from ROTC and the university.
Prerequisite:
MILS 302 Minimum Grade: D or MILS 391 Minimum Grade: D
MILS 401 The Army Officer
3.00 credits
Plan, conduct and evaluate activities of the ROTC cadet organization. Articulate goals, put plans into action to attain them. Assess organizational cohesion and develop strategies to improve it. Develop confidence in skills to lead people and manage resources. Learn/apply various Army policies and programs in this effort. Weekly requirements: up to three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MILS 401L, plus required participation in a minimum of three one hour sessions for physical fitness, and participation in several off-campus exercises (mandatory). Purchasing an annual Washington State Park Discover Pass for this class is highly encouraged. Passes are $33 per year. http://www.discoverpass.wa.gov.
Concurrent:
MILS 401L
MILS 401L Leadership Laboratory
1.00 credit
Purchasing an annual Washington State Park Discover Pass for this class is highly encouraged. Passes are $33 per year. http://www.discoverpass.wa.gov.
MILS 402 Company Grade Leadership
3.00 credits
Continues the methodology from MILS 401. Identify and resolve ethical dilemmas. Refine counseling and motivating techniques. Examine aspects of tradition and law as they relate to leading as an officer in the Army. Prepare for a future as a successful Army lieutenant. Weekly requirements: up to three hours for class and a required leadership lab, MILS 402L, plus required participation in a minimum of three one hour sessions for physical fitness, and participation in several off-campus exercises (mandatory).
MILS 402L Leadership Laboratory
1.00 credit
MILS 403 Mil Physical Fitness Program
1.00 credit
MILS 404 Military Physical Fitness
1.00 credit
MILS 490 Directed Readings
1.00- 5.00 credits
Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
Prerequisite:
MILS 302 Minimum Grade: D or MILS 391 Minimum Grade: D
MILS 491 Directed Readings
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
Prerequisite:
MILS 401 Minimum Grade: D or MILS 490 Minimum Grade: D
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.