Courses

SOSJ 101 Intro Solidarity & Soc Justice
3.00 credits
This course provides an overview of social justice theories, causes and effects of structural injustice, and various examples of social change. Distinctions between charity and social justice are clarified and special attention is paid to the practice of solidarity. Fall.
SOSJ 160 Journalistic Writing
3.00 credits
An introduction to journalistic-style writing across media platforms, including broadcast journalism and public relations writing. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Equivalent:
JOUR 110 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 180 Special Topics
.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by Instructor.
SOSJ 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
SOSJ 220 Sex, Gender and Society
3.00 credits
Explores theories and research on the constructions of masculinity and femininity and how these influence our individual lives and social institutions.
Equivalent:
SOCI 244 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
WGST 201 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 240 Social Probl, Sol & Soc Change
3.00 credits
This is a course on the study of major social problems. Specifically, the course will demonstrate how sociology skills can be employed to bring about social change. Fall.
Equivalent:
SOCI 200 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 260 Fund of Television Production
3.00 credits
A practicum dealing with the technical aspects of television production along with creative generation of live, original programs. Students learn the basics of how television signals are created and transported, and then demonstrate proficiency in all crew areas concerned with live productions. In addition, this course provides a much greater sense of media literacy as it applies to mainstream messages in the media today. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
SOSJ 260L
Equivalent:
BRCO 203 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 260L Fund of TV Production Lab
.00 credits
See SOSJ 260 for course description.
Concurrent:
SOSJ 260
Equivalent:
BRCO 203L - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 261 Photojournalism
3.00 credits
Emphasis on the role of photography in visual journalism. Includes lab instruction in photo editing techniques. Digital cameras supplied. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
INMD 101 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
JOUR 270 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 262 Civic Journalism
3.00 credits
Emphasis on the style of journalism that fosters community engagement. Research, reporting and interviewing techniques that focus on news coverage of public organizations and groups that participate in framing public policy. A variety of writing styles will be utilized.
Prerequisite:
JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D or SOSJ 160 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
JOUR 210 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 280 Special Topics
1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by Instructor.
SOSJ 310 Faith, Justice and The Church
3.00 credits
What does our Christian faith have to say about our economic, political, social and cultural structures and practices? An examination of the ways our Church calls us to practice a 'faith that does justice.' Offered annually.
Equivalent:
RELI 335 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 320 Work, Wages, and Inequality
3.00 credits
An economic perspective on labor market issues. Explores recent controversial topics such as inequality in earnings, race and sex discrimination in labor markets, immigration, minimum wage laws and labor unions, health and safety regulations in the work place. Spring.
Prerequisite:
ECON 201 Minimum Grade: D or ECON 270H Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
ECON 312 - OK if taken between Fall 2015 and Summer 2016
ECON 322 - OK if taken since Fall 2016
SOSJ 321 Race and Minority Relations
3.00 credits
A consideration, through theory and research, of the concepts of race; racial conflicts; ethnic, political, sexual, and religious minorities; and the modes of adjustment to such situations. Fall, alternate years.
Equivalent:
SOCI 323 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 322 Social & Economic Inequalities
3.00 credits
Examines the distribution of such social rewards as income, power, style of life, wealth, and prestige among members of a society. Also considers a variety of sociological explanations for the distribution of rewards; compares and contrasts stratification systems across societies. Fall, alternate years.
Equivalent:
SOCI 327 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 323 Elite & White Collar Deviance
3.00 credits
This course examines deviance and crimes committed by organizations and the rich and powerful. The nature, extend and societal effects of various types of elite and white collar deviance are examined. Spring, alternate years.
Equivalent:
CRIM 355 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOCI 355 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 325 Inequality, Crime & Urban Life
3.00 credits
In this class, student will consider the problems of crime and inequality as intertwined. Students will also move beyond simplistic explanations of these problems and towards a more complex understanding of the relationships between social institutions - like criminal justice, economics, education, politics, and the media - and how these institutions collaborate (overtly and covertly) to reproduce crime and inequality in America's inner cities. Spring.
Equivalent:
CRIM 357 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 326 African American History
3.00 credits
A study of the experiences of African-Americans from the 1600s to the present, which will include the development of slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, African-Americans on the frontier, and the African-American experience in the 20th century. Equivalent: HIST 358
Equivalent:
HIST 358 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
SOSJ 327 Sociology of Education
3.00 credits
This course is a sociological analysis of American Schools and Schooling, with a particular focus on social inequality. The course will investigate how race, class, and gender shape student experiences and the policy efforts that have been (and could be) attempted to alleviate student inequalities. Throughout the course we will address the fundamental tension between the success of individuals and the collective good in education. Equivalent: SOCI 388
Equivalent:
SOCI 388 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
SOSJ 328 -isms:Racism, Classism, Sexism
3.00 credits
This course examines the intersections of race, class and gender with respect to a wide range of issues in the United States and in relationship to the transnational context. While emphasizing race, class and gender, other categories of difference (will be woven throughout sexuality, gender identity, disability, etc.). We will use an interdisciplinary lens to explore social stratification; globalization and neoliberalism; the historical process of racialization; and social class, sex, sexuality and gender across time, cultures, gender ideologies, and feminisms. We will analyze how race and ethnicity are reproduced, maintained, contested, and resisted in social relations, institutional structures, and cultural practices. Equivalent: WGST 303
Equivalent:
WGST 303 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
SOSJ 329 Third World Development
3.00 credits
Focus on political development in the Third World. After examining the making of the Third World through imperialism and colonialism, analyzes key political institutions (the state, political parties, the military), the international economic context of dependency and vulnerability. Several case studies follow a common analytical framework to trace experiences with democratic and authoritarian rule and assess the underlying causes of democratic success and failure. Equivalents: POLS 359 and INST 310
Equivalent:
INST 310 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
POLS 359 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
SOSJ 341 Citizenship in the U.S.
3.00 credits
This course explores the history of citizenship in the United States from its founding in the Revolutionary era to the present. We will examine how and why the rights and obligations of citizenship have changed over time. We will also consider philosophical and theoretical frameworks involved in building and in understanding citizenship. And, significantly, we will explore the ways that Americans worked to democratize institutions that treated citizens differently because of race, ethnicity, class, national origin, or gender. This course is geared towards students interested in history, law, politics, ethnic studies, women’s studies, and social movements. Fall, alternate years.
Prerequisite:
HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
HIST 367 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 342 Women and Politics
3.00 credits
History and dynamics of women's political movements (both conservative and liberal) in the U.S. Survey of women's current levels and styles of participation in U.S. government and politics. Offered annually.
Equivalent:
POLS 322 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
WGST 340 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 343 Race & Ethnicity Politics
3.00 credits
Examines the conditions facing selected racial and ethnic groups in the U.S., with African Americans being the primary case for analysis. Topics include the social construction of race and ethnicity, the wide range of political strategies and tactics employed by racial and ethnic groups in pursuit of equality, and U.S. immigration policy. Offered annually.
Equivalent:
POLS 326 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 344 Collective Behavior & Soc Mvmn
3.00 credits
Crowds, riots, protests, and social movements are the subject matter of this course. These forms of social behavior are often characterized by the spontaneous development of new norms and social organization that may contradict, reinterpret and/or challenge existing social arrangements. The purpose of this course is to examine the range of collectivities encompassed within the field of collective and social movement behavior, and their impact on society particularly their role in promoting social change and social justice.
Equivalent:
SOCI 334 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 345 Global Social Change
3.00 credits
This course examines social change and its implications for individuals and groups at the local and global level, and offers sociological perspectives on the political, economic, and cultural processes of globalization throughout the world, including Asia, Latin America, North America, Africa and the Middle East. This course explores the historical development of global capitalism with a focus on the changing relationships between markets, states, and civil societies, and analyzes the forces that promote and resist these changes, including migration, state violence and social movements. Questions of power and inequality will be central to our approach, as we explore global social change through the lens of world-systems theory, neoliberalism, and neo-institutionalism. Offered every other year.
Equivalent:
SOCI 380 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 346 Tyranny to Democracy 21 C.
3.00 credits
Between 1974 and 2000 more than fifty countries in Southern Europe, Latin America, East Asia, and Eastern Europe shifted from authoritarian to democratic systems of government. Examines the causes and nature of these democratic transitions. Investigates several case studies of democratic transitions in different areas of the world in order to understand the factors responsible for the democratic trend and to ascertain which key variables best explain completed democratic transitions and democratic consolidation. Spring, alternate years.
Equivalent:
INST 392 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
POLS 368 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 347 Coming to America
3.00 credits
Immigration, race, and ethnicity in American History. We will discuss the factors that impelled our ancestors to leave the "Old Country" and the "New World" features that made it attractive. Where did they settle? How were they received? While considering ethnic identity, religion, assimilation, community, citizenship, work, gender, class, nativism, and exclusion, we will discover why it is important that we study not only our own roots, but also the background of others in this polyethnic nation.
Equivalent:
HIST 351 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 360 Writing in the Workplace
3.00 credits
Students in this course will learn how to identify and navigate social and communicative contexts that affect writing and composing processes in organizational settings. To support their learning, students will write and read about writing in the workplace, critique samples of professional writing, and research workplace writing in situ, within an organization of their choosing.
SOSJ 361 Christian Leadership
3.00 credits
The scriptural and traditional foundations for religious leadership; contemporary leadership theories; the development and role of Christian leaders in the Church and world today. Fall and Spring.
Equivalent:
RELI 343 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 362 Advanced Public Speaking
3.00 credits
A rigorous examination of the various forms of public address. Students will hone their skills through a variety of classroom presentations. Fall and Spring.
Equivalent:
COMM 321 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 363 Argumentation and Debate
3.00 credits
Examination of the fundamentals of advocacy including argumentation theory, techniques of persuasion, refutation, and cross-examination. This course is open to both debate team members and anyone interested in improving their argumentation skills.
Equivalent:
COMM 331 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 364 Persuasion
3.00 credits
Theory and practice of effective persuasive techniques. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Equivalent:
COMM 362 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 365 Interreligious Dialogue
3.00 credits
Investigates the imperative of Christianity and other world religions to engage in respectful dialogue and mutual understanding, exposes pressing practical issues such as religious violence and divisive ideologies, and proposes a comparative theological perspective highlighting spiritual engagement, moral responsibility and reconciliation. Fall and Spring.
Equivalent:
INST 304 - OK if taken since Spring 2016
RELI 350 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 366 Writing for Social Action
3.00 credits
In this course, we will approach writing for social action from a rhetorical perspective, focusing on purpose and audience as well as genre, form, and the craft of writing. Throughout the semester, you will be asked to analyze texts produced by contemporary and historical social movements and activists in order to discern best practices when advocating for a cause.
Equivalent:
ENGL 309 - OK if taken since Fall 2018
SOSJ 367 Emerging Media
3.00 credits
Students integrate reporting and research with audio, video, photos and text to produce and design multimedia packages in a journalistic context. Students may utilize blogging, podcasting, social media and emerging media techniques. Some focus on analysis of the optimal platforms for presenting journalistic content. Spring. Equivalent: JOUR 370
Prerequisite:
JOUR 110 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
JOUR 370 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
SOSJ 397 Special Topics
1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
SOSJ 410 Theories Solidarity & Soc Just
3.00 credits
This course is designed to fulfill the requirements of the Solidarity and Social Justice minor. It builds on the background provided by other courses in the minor and the Core by focusing more explicitly on the role public reason plays in the pursuit of solidarity and social justice. The course will ask “what is justice and how is it related to human solidarity? How do we ground claims about solidarity and social justice through an appeal to reason? What role should reason play in shaping our models of justice and what role can it play in the promotion of solidarity and social justice?”
Equivalent:
PHIL 408 - OK if taken between Fall 2015 and Summer 2017
PHIL 462 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
SOSJ 411 Social Justice
3.00 credits
This course will critically consider famous theories of justice, as well as their applications to some social and moral problems.
Equivalent:
PHIL 409 - OK if taken between Fall 2015 and Summer 2017
PHIL 463 - OK if taken since Fall 2017
SOSJ 412 Ancient Concepts of Justice
3.00 credits
Many Modern theories of social justice rest upon models developed in classical antiquity. Similarly, many modern institutions and laws relating to justice have ancient precursors. This course examines major classical texts dealing with justice: selected Pre-Socratic texts; Plato, Republic; Thucydides, History of Peloponnesian war, Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, Book V, selections from Cicero; selections from other Hellenistic and late Roman authors (including Augustine).
Equivalent:
PHIL 414 - OK if taken since Fall 2016
PHIL 481 - OK if taken between Fall 2015 and Summer 2016
SOSJ 419 Special Topics Block A
1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
SOSJ 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
SOSJ 439 Special Topics Block B
1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
SOSJ 459 Special Topics Block C
1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
SOSJ 461 Intercultural & Intern'l Comm
3.00 credits
Identification and analysis of processes and problems of communication as affected by nation and culture. Effects of differences in attitudes, social organization, role expectations, language and non-verbal behavior - all of which are interrelated. Principles of communication theory as they apply to the intercultural context will be studied. Fall and Spring.
Equivalent:
COMM 418 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 462 Ethnography
3.00 credits
How do you cover a community? In this ethnography class, students will cultivate relationships in disenfranchised/disempowered communities and write stories based on that research. As writers, students will extend beyond reporting events to try to explain contextual meaning as well as the cultural constructs of that community. Spring.
Equivalent:
COMM 381 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 464 Communication & Leadership
3.00 credits
A critical examination of the reciprocity between effective communication and successful leadership. Includes a historical examination of leadership styles, theories, and research. Includes an analysis of motivation, power, and organizational culture, and writing and speaking assignments designed to cultivate leadership skills. Fall.
Equivalent:
COMM 401 - OK if taken since Fall 2015
SOSJ 479 Special Topics Block D
1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
SOSJ 497 Internship
.00 - 6.00 credits
Practical experience working within a variety of settings related to the field of solidarity and social justice. Internships are individually arranged.
SOSJ 499 Solidarity & Soc Jus Praxis
3.00 credits
Students taking this capstone course will participate in a semester-long internship for a justice-oriented organization. As a "praxis" course, the goal is for students to combine action with reflection and understanding. Students will meet weekly to reflect on their practical internship experience and integrate empirical and theoretical information.