Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Information & Resources

Latest Updates

May 27

April 27

April 20

April 16

Updated May 27, 2020, 4:40 p.m.

General Health Guidelines

If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have COVID-19, please review these guidelines from the Washington State Department of Health to care for yourself and to help protect other people in your home and community.

  1. What to do if you have confirmed or suspected coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
  2. What to do if you were potentially exposed to someone with confirmed coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
  3. What to do if you have symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and have not been around anyone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a Coronavirus Self-Checker. The purpose of the Coronavirus Self-Checker is to help you make decisions about seeking appropriate medical care. The system is not intended for the diagnosis or treatment of disease or other conditions, including COVID-19. To use the Self-Checker, click on the following link and complete the Self-Checker survey in the gold box on the right-hand side of your screen.

Coronavirus Self-Checker

Updated March 27, 2020, 11:05 a.m.

Are you a First-Year, Transfer, or Prospective student? Do you have questions about the Undergraduate Admissions process, Financial Aid, or other COVID-19-related issues? Check out the Undergraduate Admissions COVID-19 FAQ

 

The Gonzaga University (GU) Emergency Management Team is monitoring the outbreak in coordination with state and local health departments. As of the date above, no members of the GU community have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

This page is intended to provide information about COVID-19, precautions that are being taken and prevention measures you can take, as well as information on the effects of measures various agencies are taking to stem the outbreak.

This page is not intended to be all-encompassing and should not be considered to be providing medical or legal advice. In all instances, you should consult with a relevant expert for guidance specific to your circumstances.

This is an evolving situation, and updates are available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Washington State Department of Health and the Spokane Regional Health District. Travel notices for countries with community transmission are available through the CDC website.
 
 

Health, wellness, and prevention

The virus has been named “SARS-CoV-2” and the disease it causes has been named “coronavirus disease 2019” (abbreviated “COVID-19”). 

COVID-19 is a newly identified coronavirus that is causing an outbreak of respiratory illness. It was first identified in December 2019 in the city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Since then, the virus has been identified in multiple countries internationally, including cases in the United States (U.S.).

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), human coronaviruses are common throughout the world and usually cause mild to moderate illness in people. This new virus is a public health concern because: 

  • It is newly identified and much is still unknown about it.
  • Two other human coronaviruses, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, have caused severe illness.

There have been NO reported cases of COVID-19 on the Gonzaga University campus.

Updated March 16, 2020 at 4:08 p.m.
 

The CDC has reported community spread of COVID-19 in a number of states including Washington. The first reported deaths in the U.S. occurred in Washington state as a result of community spread and the situation is being closely monitored and mitigated by government agencies and public health officials. COVID-19 is spread:

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • By respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
  • Possibly by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touching your own mouth, nose or eyes. This is not the main way the virus spreads.

According to the CDC, the virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Transmission in the United States

In the United States (U.S.), COVID-19 cases include:

  • Imported cases in travelers.
  • Cases among close contacts of a known case.
  • Community-acquired cases where the source of the infection is unknown.

The CDC has reported community spread of COVID-19 in a number of states including Washington. The first reported deaths in the U.S. occurred in Washington state as a result of community spread and the situation is being closely monitored and mitigated by government agencies and public health officials.

Updated March 12, 2020 at 5:35 p.m.
 

According to the CDC, at this time, the general American public, including Gonzaga University students and employees, are unlikely to be exposed to this virus. The immediate health risk from COVID-19 is considered low.

As more COVID-19 testing has become available, more states with likely report cases of COVID-19. The risk assessment will continue to be updated as the situation evolves.

Updated March 12, 2020 at 5:38 p.m.
 

Symptoms usually appear within 2- 14 days after exposure. Symptoms may be flu-like, ranging from mild to serious, and include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

Risks for developing symptoms of COVID-19 include:

  • Travel to any affected geographical area within the past 14 days.
  • Having close contact with someone who is known to have had COVID-19.
Updated March 12, 2020 at 5:41 p.m.
 

There is no vaccine to prevent this virus. The most effective prevention at this time is to avoid exposure. You can visit the CDC website on prevention for detailed information. A summary of this information is below.

The CDC recommends the following actions to minimize your risks:

  • Stay informed and up-to-date by monitoring the CDC website.
  • Get vaccinated for influenza (the flu) and other respiratory diseases.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • If you think you are sick, call your health care provider first for assistance.

There are also several “do not” actions the CDC recommends:

  • Do not travel to affected geographic areas.
  • Do not use face masks. CDC does not recommend the use of face masks for the general public to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
  • Do not show prejudice to people of/from affected areas out of fear of this new virus. Do not assume that someone from an affected area is more likely to have the virus.
 

The CDC recommends that the general public wear cloth face coverings in public settings, in addition to practicing good social distancing and hygiene issues, particularly in areas of significant community-based transmission.

The general public should not wear surgical masks or N-95 respirators as these critical supplies should be maintained for use by healthcare workers and other medical first responders.

In support of this recommendation, Gonzaga will not be providing N-95 respirators or surgical masks for general use by employees. Employees may voluntarily decide to wear a cloth face covering at work in support of their individual risk assessments and needs.

Further information about this recommendation, as well as a demonstration to make a cloth face covering, are located on the CDC website.

Updated April 16, 9:20 a.m.

 

Monitor your symptoms closely.

If you have a fever or cough, you might have COVID-19.  If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have COVID-19, follow the steps below to care for yourself and to help protect other people in your home and community.

Stay home except to get medical care

  • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care.
  • Avoid public areas: Do not go to work, school, or public areas.
  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home

  • Stay away from others: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Limit contact with pets & animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus.
  • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a facemask. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.

Call ahead before visiting your healthcare provider

  • Call ahead: If you have a medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.

Wear a facemask if you are sick

  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.
  • Should I go to my healthcare provider’s office and get tested for COVID-19? 
  • If you have any of the conditions that may increase your risk for a serious viral infection, age 60 years or over, are pregnant, or have medical conditions, call your healthcare provider’s office and ask if you need to be evaluated in person. They may want monitor your health more closely or test you for influenza. 
  • If you do not have a high-risk condition and your symptoms are mild, you do not need to be evaluated in person and do not need to be tested for COVID-19. There are currently no medications to treat COVID-19. 

Take care of yourself. Rest as much as possible. Drink lots of fluids.

The CDC also advises you to:

  • Avoid contact with others and do not travel while sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Clean your hands by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If no soap and water is available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60%–95% alcohol immediately after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.

Please do not show up at a clinic, urgent care or other health facility without calling first. If you have a medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have (or may have) COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.

  • Telemedicine (Teladoc for Gonzaga employees on Premera) may also be available, enabling you to consult a provider from home.
  • Students on the Spokane campus may contact Gonzaga University Health & Counseling Services at (509) 313-4052 or their primary care provider.
  • Faculty, other academic personnel, and staff should contact their primary care provider.
Updated March 27, 2020 at 11:03 a.m.
 

Only health care providers can request a test for the virus that causes COVID-19. Testing is based on symptoms and risk factors such as travel history or exposure to individuals known to have the disease.

For this reason, walk-in testing is NOT available at any health care facility in the region, including Gonzaga University Health and Counseling Services.

If you are experiencing respiratory symptoms, DO NOT go to a health care provider before calling first. Please follow the directions in the “What do I do if I feel sick?” question if you are ill.

Updated March 12, 2020 at 6:09 p.m.
 

If you are sick with COVID-19 or your health care provider suspects you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and you have been tested, follow the steps below to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.

1) Stay home except to get medical care.

  • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care.
  • Avoid public areas: Do not go to work, school, or public areas.
  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

2) Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home.

  • Stay away from others: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Limit contact with pets & animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus.
  • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a facemask. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.

3) Call ahead before visiting your healthcare provider.

  • Call ahead: If you have a medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.

4) Wear a face mask if you are sick.

  • If you are sick: You should wear a face mask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.
  • Should I go to my healthcare provider’s office and get tested for COVID-19?
    • If you have any of the conditions that may increase your risk for a serious viral infection, age 60 years or over, are pregnant, or have medical conditions, call your healthcare provider’s office and ask if you need to be evaluated in person. They may want monitor your health more closely or test you for influenza.
    • If you do not have a high-risk condition and your symptoms are mild, you do not need to be evaluated in person and do not need to be tested for COVID-19. There are currently no medications to treat COVID-19. 

5) Take care of yourself. Rest as much as possible. Drink lots of fluids.

The CDC also advises you to:

  • Avoid contact with others and do not travel while sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Clean your hands by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If no soap and water is available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60%–95% alcohol immediately after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items.
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday.
  • Monitor your symptoms.
  • Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing).
    • Before seeking care:
      • Call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19.
      • Put on a face mask before you enter the facility.
      • These steps will help the healthcare provider keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting infected or exposed.
    • Ask your healthcare provider to call the local or state health department. Persons who are placed under active monitoring or facilitated self-monitoring should follow instructions provided by their local health department or occupational health professionals, as appropriate.
    • If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the dispatch personnel that you have, or are being evaluated for COVID-19. If possible, put on a face mask before emergency medical services arrive.
Updated March 12, 2020 at 5:59 p.m.
 

According to the CDC, there is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19. People with COVID-19 should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. For severe cases, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions.

People who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 should contact their healthcare provider immediately.

 

According to the Washington State Department of Health, people with preexisting health conditions are at higher risk to develop complications from a COVID-19 infection. Your health is the top priority, so public health officials may recommend that you stay home if there are more community infections.

The Department of Health has created guidelines to help you plan and prepare in the event of needing to limit time in public or if you become sick. Your health care team can also assess your current medications and conditions to help you think about actions that can minimize risk to you and your household.

 

As you are returning from a geographic area with a COVID-19 outbreak, please plan to stay home for 14 days and self-monitor for symptoms.

  • Stay home and away from others for 14 days
  • Self-monitor your health for symptoms of fever, cough or difficulty breathing
  • Avoid close contact with others (at least 6 feet apart)
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alconhol based hand-sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Clean your hands often with soap and water—if not available use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday
  • If you become ill during the 14 days, notify the Spokane Regional Health District at (509) 324-1500

We recommend that anyone returning from a country with a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Travel Notice check in with secondary Gonzaga University contacts even if you have mild or no symptoms.

Updated March 17, 2020 at 11:32 a.m.
 
 

We understand that some community members are concerned. Remember that according to our state and local health departments, the risk to the Gonzaga University community and to the U.S. population as a whole is currently low. If you would like to talk with someone, support is available to students through campus mental health services:

You can help prevent the spread of coronavirus and other viral illnesses by doing the following:

  • Get vaccinated for influenza (the flu) and other respiratory diseases.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • If you think you are sick, call your health care provider first for assistance

How can I manage my concern for family and friends who live in areas directly affect by COVID-19?

If you have family or friends in an area affected by COVID-19, you may have concerns about them. We encourage you to be in contact with them. It is also helpful to stay informed and up to date by monitoring the CDC website. If you would like to talk with someone, support is available:

Updated March 17, 2020 at 11:43 p.m.
 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces (e.g., door knobs, tables, keyboards light switches). Use a disinfectant registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or a 10% bleach/water solution to clean surfaces. Please avoid putting disinfectant gels or liquids on electronics and other equipment, including elevator buttons, unless they have been indicated as safe to use on those devices.

You can also check the CDC's website for more tips on how to clean and disinfect as well as how to protect yourself.

Updated March 17, 2020 at 12:11 p.m.

 

The University’s custodial cleaning program uses an EPA-registered disinfectant to clean touchpoints, public and common area restrooms and kitchens daily. Students living in on-campus housing are expected to clean the private bathrooms in their residences.

There are also dispenser stations throughout campus containing hand sanitizer. Hand sanitizer can help prevent the spread of the virus, though proper hand-washing technique is deemed to be more effective by the CDC.

Facilities crews have also implemented extra measures to clean and disinfect surfaces in public areas that are touched frequently. This includes surfaces such as door handles, banisters, and elevator buttons. An increased cleaning of these “touch points” has been in place since October to reduce health risks during flu season. But we have stepped up these preventative measures to further mitigate risks of the novel coronavirus. It is also recommended that all departments purchase single use disinfectant wipes for human touch points within their work spaces such as keyboards, public counters, credit card readers, phones, and shared surfaces and items. We will continue to monitor recommendations from the CDC for preventing the spread of the virus.

 

Tuition and Fees

The University is absolutely committed, despite these extraordinary times, to doing everything possible to support our students in completing their coursework this semester. In addition to the added expense associated with the transition to digital environments and the additional time involved with course preparation in that context, we continue to provide many of the student services that are available when students are on-campus. For this reason, we are not pro-rating tuition, or course fees, as we will continue to provide an enriching experience for our students. Gonzaga asks for your flexibility and understanding while we work to give our students the best experience possible in these unprecedented times.

 

The University will be refunding 50% of the room charge and the meal plan charge (less Bulldog Bucks) to students who are not living in Gonzaga’s residence halls after spring break.

 

Gonzaga appreciates that parking usage patterns for our students, faculty and staff have been impacted by the State of Washington Stay Home, Stay Healthy order. Parking pass fees are used to support annual parking, safety and security infrastructure on campus and such costs are incurred regardless of usage patterns. Additionally, such fees also support other parking, safety and security equipment and technology investments that benefit the campus community over the life of such investments. As such, no refunds will be issued for parking pass fees.

Moving forward Campus Security and Public Safety will review parking pass renewal fees for the coming year beginning in August 2020 in light of COVID-19. Should you have further questions or concerns you can contact Becky Wilkey, Director of Campus Security and Public Safety at (509) 313-3996.

 

Back to Table of Contents


Campus housing

Housing and Residence Life is committed to providing as much information as possible for our students during this period. We have received several requests for information regarding what will happen to personal belongings for students unable to return to campus. A process for returning or storing student belongings has not been determined but is under development at the administrative level of the university. We anticipate that we will have a process in place on or before April 13th. Should you have essential items (textbooks, course material, computers, medical devices) that need to be packed and shipped, we are committed to doing so. Please note, federal law prevents us from mailing prescription drugs. To receive such items, please fill out the Essential Items form on the Zagliving portal. Please note, non-essential items will not be shipped at this time. Additionally, we will not donate or throw out belongings before exhausting all attempts to connect with students.

 

Once a process has been determined regarding non-essential property, we will communicate that plan. We appreciate your patience in this time of significant challenge.

 

All on-campus residence are closing.  Specifically:

  • Alliance
  • Burch
  • Catherine/Monica
  • Chardin
  • Corkery
  • Coughlin
  • Crimont
  • Cushing
  • DeSmet
  • Dillon
  • Dooley
  • Dussault
  • Goller
  • Kennedy
  • Lincoln
  • Madonna
  • Marian
  • Roncalli
  • Sharp Apartment
  • Sharp House
  • Twohy

Questions for residents in university-owned off-campus apartments and houses are addressed at the conclusion of the FAQ.

 
Yes, ZagCards will work until March 27th at 5:00 p.m.  You should still have your room keys.  If not, you'll need to contact Campus Security for a "key service."  If you need building access after 5:00 p.m. on March 27th but before April 13th, please contact the Housing Office to make arrangements.
 

 You can move out of your room at any time between now and March 27th at 5:00 p.m. without prior arrangement. After 5:00 p.m. on March 27th, your access will be allowed after submission of the Check-Out Information Form on ZagLiving. The deadline for you to remove all of your belongings is April 13, 2020.

If circumstances make returning to move out of your room by April 13th an impossibility, please contact the Housing Office at (509) 313-4103, between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., secure your belongings and check out of your room.

 

An Express check out envelope was provided underneath your unit door. There may be multiple envelopes – one for you and another for your roommate, suitemates or apartment mates. If you don’t find an express checkout envelope, please contact the Housing and Residence Life Office, 509-313-4103, housing@gonzaga.edu.

Please complete the information on the envelope and place your keys inside. After completely moving out, please place the envelope in the blue drop box on the south side of Crosby (outside the building). This drop box will be checked daily.

 

Please mail your keys back to the Housing and Residence Life office (include your name) by April 13, 2020:

Housing and Residence Life

502 E Boone Ave.

Spokane, WA 99258-2515

 

To reduce the possible exposure of the virus to others, you should remove all of your belongings and place your trash in the dumpster outside. If you have items to donate to veterans, please take them to the collection sites in the McCarthy Parking Lot, DeSmet Circle and Tilford Parking Lot. Our partners with the Army National Guard will be on site between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 19th through Saturday, March 21st to take your donations. We would appreciate it if you do your best to clean your space with the supplies on hand.

 

Yes, we have compiled a list of storage facilities. You can find them here.

 

Yes. Boxes will be made available as needed.

 

If circumstances make returning to move out of your room by April 13th an impossibility, please contact the Housing Office at (509) 313-4103, between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and we will work with you on making special arrangements to secure your belongings and check out of your room.

 

In order to reduce social density and promote social distancing, we strongly recommend students return to their permanent residence. We recognize that for a few students returning to your permanent address may not be possible due to extenuating circumstances.

International students, housing-insecure students, and those who for any reason cannot leave campus may apply to remain in the residence halls, and these requests will be handled on a case-by-case basis. Students who are approved to remain must agree to abide by a more restrictive set of standards for personal conduct, including behaviors intended to reduce the risk of viral transmission, and in certain cases, may be relocated to another room on campus. Students who seek permission to remain on campus and who fall into one of the above categories must submit a Request to Stay form on ZagLiving as soon as possible, but no later than Monday, March 23rd at 12:00 p.m. Noon (PDT). Students requesting an exception will be informed of a decision no later than Wednesday, March 25th.

 

If you have a computer, textbooks, or class materials in your room that you need immediately for your classes, please contact the Housing Office. We will make arrangements as soon as we are able to ship these to you. Additionally, if you have medicine in your room that you need, please let us know.

 

At this time, Sodexo Zag Dining plans to continue to provide "grab and go" meal service from the COG for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and currently plans to have both Starbucks and The Marketplace remain open. This is subject to change based on health district directives. If you have question about what meals are offered and dietary restrictions, please contact Sodexo (509) 313-6934.

 

We expect you to treat the situation in which we all find ourselves with regard to COVID-19 seriously. We will have a ‘no tolerance’ policy for conduct that is in violation of our expectations, which can be found here.

 

Yes. This applies to apartments as well as our houses. If you elect to stay, you may remain until the end of your lease term. If, however, you choose to vacate, your rent will be pro-rated and an appropriate refund will be issued. It may be the case that in certain houses, some residents may choose to stay while others choose to vacate. In this situation, students choosing to stay will not be required to pay increased rent.

 

We will calculate a credit to your student account for room and meal plan charges on a pro-rata basis for the remainder of the Spring semester. If a refund is calculated, such amounts will be paid no later than April 10th. If the payor is not the student or parent, such as payments made by a third-party grantor for an outside scholarship, calculated refunds owed will be issued to the third-party grantor.

Any students that are making payments to the University under a payment plan will receive an update on any amounts owed after application of housing and meal plan credits. If you have additional questions please contact Student Accounts at (509) 313-6812. We appreciate your patience as we undertake the work of calculating and processing refunds.

 

There are no restrictions on campus events at this time. Take precautions you would normally take to help prevent the spread of colds and viruses during flu season and remind attendees of these precautions.

 

Questions should be directed to the department coordinating your program. They are consulting with the University Emergency Operations Team and may make program-specific changes or decisions. All participants should take normal precautions related to self-care and the spread of colds and viruses.

 

Back to Table of Contents


International student information

Every student’s situation is different. Gonzaga University’s International Student & Scholar Services (ISSS) office encourages you to make an appointment with your International Student Advisor. Please contact them directly or e-mail isss@gonzaga.edu to set up an appointment to discuss your situation.

 

Gonzaga University is working on a contingency plan in case it is recommended for students to not return to their home country over summer vacation. As the summer approaches, we will reach out to impacted students, if necessary.

 

Every student’s situation is different. We will continue to monitor the situation as the summer semester approaches and can work with you to defer your application. Please contact isss@gonzaga.edu for more information.

 

Back to Table of Contents


Public health response and testing

To protect their privacy, Gonzaga University is not able to legally release personal information about any students or University community members who are being monitored or tested for COVID-19, including their location.

Should any Gonzaga University community member be diagnosed with COVID-19, the Spokane Regional Health District and Gonzaga University would initiate appropriate protocols to protect the health of anyone deemed to be at risk.

 

Spokane Regional Health District closely monitors people who are at potential risk and have protocols for contacting individuals who may have been in close contact with Gonzaga University community members being screened for COVID-19, such as roommates.

Should any Gonzaga University community member be diagnosed with COVID-19, the Spokane Regional Health District and Gonzaga University would initiate appropriate protocols to protect the health of anyone deemed to be at risk.

 

Many of us are concerned about what the people in our communities may be experiencing, including possible stigmatization or discrimination based on racial bias or appearances and recent return from areas most affected by COVID-19. Please help others understand that the risk of coronavirus is not at all connected with race, ethnicity or nationality. As stated by the CDC, travelers from affected areas have performed a valuable service to everyone by helping make sure this disease does not spread further. Helping fight an outbreak can be mentally and emotionally challenging. These travelers need social support upon their return.

Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem. We can fight stigma and help not hurt others by providing social support. We can communicate the facts and prevent the unnecessary harm of stigma.

 

For current information about this evolving public health situation, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) page.

The Washington State Department of Health has established a call center to address questions from the public. If you have questions about what is happening in Washington state, how the virus is spread, or what to do if you have symptoms, please call 1-800-525-0127 and press #.

For local information, visit the following online resources:

 

Back to Table of Contents


Gonzaga Study Abroad

The State Department has issued a "Global Level 4 Health Advisory – Do Not Travel".  All Gonzaga students studying abroad have been strongly encouraged to return home.

 

Students are encouraged to contact the Study Abroad Office at studyabroad@gonzaga.edu for guidance on course completion.

 

Spring 2020

The State Department has issued a “Global Level 4 Health Advisory – Do Not Travel”.  All Gonzaga students studying abroad have been strongly encouraged to return home.  

Summer 2020

GU will now officially cancel summer 2020 Study Abroad programs.

Fall 2020

The Study Abroad programs for Fall 2020 are about 6 months from the start date. At this point, Gonzaga anticipates that all of our study abroad programs will operate as scheduled. However, we continue to monitor the situation and will keep students and families informed as the situation evolves.