Teacher Education

Chairperson: Suzann Girtz
Elementary Program Director:
 
Secondary Program Director:

Directed by our Jesuit mission, the School of Education develops socially responsible professionals who serve with care, competence, and commitment. The department of teacher education offers a thorough preparation in professional teaching at the undergraduate level. We prepare educational leaders to serve others in need and demonstrate a commitment to social justice. We provide teacher candidates with the opportunity to become reflective learners and practitioners of elementary or secondary education. Teacher candidates have three field experiences prior to a full semester of student teaching to prepare them as successful practitioners. Many courses in the program offer a community based service learning activity providing candidates an opportunity to experience servant leadership.

As a community of reflective learners, faculty, staff, and teacher candidates are involved in a supportive relationship which encourages service for others and responsibility to one another.
The Teacher Education program is advised by a Professional Education Advisory Board (PEAB) composed of area teachers, school administrators, educational staff associates, representatives of professional organizations, teacher candidates, and faculty.

The Teacher Certification program meets standards specified by the Washington Professional Education Standards Board (PESB) and the Northwest Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC).

There are different options to obtain teacher certification. One option is a Bachelor of Education degree in Physical Education, Special Education or Community, Culture and Language in Education, which includes teacher certification, or elementary and secondary teacher candidates can combine certification requirements with a degree from one of the other schools/colleges in the University.

Applicants seeking Elementary Education Certification will receive an Elementary endorsement and can teach grades K-8 as generalists in a self-contained classroom. Secondary Education Certification candidates can teach grades 5-12 and choose a specific content area (endorsement) to teach. The content area must be selected from one of the following approved endorsements offered at Gonzaga: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, English Language Arts, Health and Fitness, Mathematics, Music, Special Education, Social Studies, Theater Arts, and designated World Languages. Additional endorsements are encouraged.

The teacher candidate is assigned a Teacher Education advisor during the EDTE 101 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education course. The role of this advisor is to guide the teacher candidate through the certification program. The teacher candidate's academic advisor (assigned when admitted to the University) will advise the teacher candidate regarding degree requirements.

Washington State certification requirements may change, so it is the applicant’s responsibility to stay current by checking with their School of Education advisor and the Certification Office.

All teacher candidates in the field are required to have a current FBI/Washington State Patrol fingerprint clearance on file, and have completed the Pre-Residency Clearance to take part in any Teacher Education Field Experience.

Admission to Teacher Certification Program Requirements:

Admission into the teacher certification program is dependent on completion of the following:

  1. 12 credits of education coursework successfully completed including one field experience.
  2. All courses required for teacher certification must be a 2.00 or higher.
  3. Cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher across GU courses.
  4. Cumulative GPA of 3.00 across EDTE courses.
  5. Passing score for the Basic Skill Requirement in each category: Reading, Writing, and Math with minimum scores in either the WEST B, SAT, ACT or CBEST test.
  6. Current Pre-Residency Clearance.
  7.  Current FBI/Washington State Patrol Fingerprint Clearance on file.
  8. No uncorrected documented disposition concerns.

Please refer to the Teacher Education secondary and elementary advising sheets or a Teacher Education Advisor for updated information.

Elementary Education Certification Program Requirements:

EDTE 101 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education 3 credits
EDSE 150 Psychology of Children with Exceptionalities
3 credits
EDTE 201 Learning Theories and Epistemologies 3 credits
EDTE 213 NW History Elementary Teachers 1 credit
EDTE 221E Elementary Differentiated Instruction and Assessment 3 credits

EDTE 221L Field Experience

1 credit
EDTE 231 Instructional Methods: Reading, Writing, Communications I
   (Spring Only)
3 credits
EDTE 315E Classroom Assessment for Elementary Teachers 3 credits
ENGL English Composition/Grammar or equivalent 3 credits
SPCO Speech – Communications or equivalent
POLS 101 American Politics 3 credits
MATH 104 Elements of Algebra and Statistics 3 credits
HIST 201 or 202 History of the U.S. I or II 3 credits

BIOL 181 Biological Systems

2 credits
BIOL 181L Biological Systems Lab  1 credit 
EDTE 304 Concepts in Science 3 credits
EDTE 331 Instructional Methods: Reading, Writing, Communication II
3 credits
EDTE 331L Field Experience 1 credit
EDTE 400 Elementary Methods: Music 1 credit
EDTE 401 Elementary Methods: Mathematics  3 credits
EDTE 401L Field Experience 
1 credit
EDTE 402 Elementary Methods: Social Studies 3 credits
EDTE 403 Elementary Methods: Art 1 credit
EDTE 404 Elementary Methods: Science 3 credits
EDPE 415 Physical Education Methods 1 credit
EDPE 416 Health Education Methods 1 credit
EDPE 417 Abuse Prevention 1 credit
EDTE 460E Classroom Management: Elementary 3 credits

Admission to Student Teaching Requirements:

  1. All certification coursework and endorsement work must be completed.
  2. All courses required for teacher certification must be a 2.00 or higher.
  3. Cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher in all GU courses.
  4. Cumulative GPA of 3.0 in al EDTE courses.
  5. Passing score for the Basic Skill Requirement in each category: Reading, Writing, and Math with minimum scores in either the WEST B, SAT, ACT or CBEST test.
  6. Current Pre-residency clearance.
  7. Current FBI / Washington State Patrol Fingerprint Clearance on file.
  8. No uncorrected documented disposition concerns.
  9. Elementary NES test taken prior to student teaching. Passage of Elementary NES test is required for Program Completion.
  10. Attendance is mandatory at the Student Teacher Application Meeting. Refer to the Certification Advisement Handbook and the Student Teaching Handbook for additional requirements and information.
EDTE 496E Elementary Student Teaching 12 credits
EDSE 450 Special Education Seminar 1 credit
EDTE 495 Student Teaching Professional Seminar 2 credits
Refer to the Certification Advisement Handbook and the Student Teaching Handbook for additional requirements and information.

Admission to Teacher Certification Program Requirements: Secondary

  1. 12 credits of education coursework successfully completed including one field experience.
  2. All courses required for teacher certification must be a 2.00 or higher.
  3. Cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher across G.U. courses.
  4. Cumulative GPA of 3.0 across EDTE courses.
  5. Passing score for the Basic Skill Requirement in each category: Reading, Writing, and Math with minimum scores in either the WEST B, SAT, ACT or CBEST test
  6. Current Pre-residency Clearance.
  7. Current FBI/Washington State Patrol Fingerprint Clearance on file.
  8. No uncorrected documented disposition concerns.

Secondary Education Certification Program Requirements:

EDTE 101 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education 3 credits
EDSE 150 Psychology of Children with Exceptionalities 3 credits
EDTE 201 Learning Theories and Epistemologies 3 credits
EDTE 221S Differentiated Instruction and Assessment 3 credits
EDTE 221L Field Experience 3 credits
EDTE 241 Teaching in the Middle School 3 credits
Must be taken as a block: (Spring only)
EDTE 315S Classroom Assessment for Secondary Teachers
3 credits
EDPE 417 Abuse Prevention
1 credit
EDTE 418 Discipline Specific Literacy
3 credits
EDTE 418L Field Experience
1 credit
Secondary Specific Methods
One methods course is required for each endorsement area (Fall Only)
Must be taken as a block: (Fall only)
EDTE 454D Secondary Methods-Theater Arts
3 credits
EDTE 454E Secondary Methods-English
3 credits
EDTE 454F Secondary Methods-Social Studies
3 credits
EDTE 454M Secondary Methods-Mathematics
3 credits
EDTE 454S Secondary Methods-Science
3 credits
EDTE 454T Secondary Methods-World Language
3 credits
(Music Education and Physical Education majors will take methods in their degree program)

EDTE 454L Secondary Field Experience
1 credit
EDTE 455L Field Experience: Additional Endorsement
(Required for additional endorsements)
1 credit
EDTE 460S Classroom Management: Secondary
3 credits

Admission to Student Teaching Requirements:

  1. All certification and endorsement course work must be completed.
  2. A course grade below a 2.0 cannot count toward certification
  3. Cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher in all GU courses.
  4. Cumulative GPA of 3.0 in all EDTE courses.
  5. Passing score for the Basic Skill Requirement in each category: Reading, Writing, and Math with minimum scores in either the WEST B, SAT, ACT or CBEST test
  6. Current Pre-residency clearance.
  7. Current FBI/Washington State Patrol Fingerprint Clearance on file.
  8. No uncorrected documented disposition concerns.
  9. WEST E or NES taken prior to Student Teaching. Passage of WEST E or NES endorsement test is required for program completion.
  10. Attendance is mandatory at the Student Teacher Application Meeting.
EDTE 496S Secondary Student Teaching 12 credits
EDSE 450 Special Education Seminar 1 credit
EDTE 495 Student Teaching Professional Seminar 2 credits
Please refer to the Certification Advisement Handbook and the Student Teaching Handbook for additional requirements and information.

Optional Endorsements

 

ESL English Speakers of Other Language Endorsement:  14 credits

MTSL 304 Immigrant and Refugee Perspectives 3 credits
MTSL 401 Theory and Practice of Language Teaching 3 credits
MTSL 408 Principles of Second Language Acquisition 3 credits
EDTE 466 Literacy for English Language Learners 3 credits
MTSL 450 Language Awareness 1 credit
MTSL 480 TESOL Field Experience 1 credit

Reading Endorsement: 17 Credits

EDTE 231 Reading, Writing, & Communication I 3 credits
EDTE 331 Reading, Writing & Communication II 3 credits
EDTE 331L Field Experience 1 credit
EDTE 461 Reading Diagnosis 3 credits
EDTE 462 Child and Adolescent Literature 3 credits
EDTE 464 Reading Practicum 1 credit
EDTE 466 Literacy for English Language Learners 3 credits

Community, Culture, and Language in Education Major: 34-37 credits

Lower Division
EDTE 101 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education 3 credits
EDTE 201 Learning Theories and Epistemologies  3 credits
EDTE 200/MTSL 200 Language, Society, and Power 3 credits
EDTE 202/MTSL 202 Community and Ethnography 3 credits
EDTE 204/MTSL 204 Community Languages and Language Acquisition 3 credits
EDTE 206 Community and Place-Based Education 3 credits
Upper Division  
MTSL 304 Immigrant and Refugee Perspectives 3 credits
EDTE 302 Policy and Advocacy 3 credits
   
Choose one of the following two concentrations:   
   
Elementary Education Concentration: 13 credits  
MTSL 401 Theory and Practice of Language Teaching 3 credits
MTSL 480 TESOL Field Experience 1 credit
EDTE 306 Critical Pedagogical Issues in American Education 3 credits
EDTE 466 Literacy and the 2nd Language Learner 3 credits
Electives (choose one of the following):  3 credits
PSYC 457 Poverty and Social Class
 
SOCI 388 Sociology of Education
 
   
Community Education Concentration: 10-13 credits  
MTSL 401 Theory and Practice of Language Teaching 3 credits
MTSL 480 TESOL Field Experience 1 credit
Electives (choose at least two of the following):  6-9 credits
ENGL 306 Language, Diversity, and Social Justice
 
ENGL 480 Literary and Cultural Studies
 
MTSL 405/EDTE 305 Intercultural Competence Development
 
POLS 366 Perspectives on Global Issues
 
PSYC 318 Cultural Psychology
 
PSYC 457 Poverty and Social Class
 
SOCI 388 Sociology of Education
 
Lower Division
EDTE 101 Social & Cultural Fnds of Educ
3.00 credits
This course provides an overview of the teaching profession. It is designed as an exploration of teaching as a career choice, serving as an introduction to various philosophical positions regarding education, the laws that affect students and teachers, the global and historical background of our current educational systems, and the issues concerned with recognizing, accepting, and affirming diversity.
EDTE 200 Language, Society, and Power
3.00 credits
EDTE 201 Learning Thry & Epistemologies
3.00 credits
This course is designed to introduce the undergraduate teacher candidate to theories of learning. The contributions of behaviorism, humanistic psychology, and cognitive psychology will be examined in order to give a basis for critically analyzing how and why human development and growth occur in the teaching/learning act. Based on the dynamics of respect for individual differences within the learning community, prior learning, and authentic scholarly exploration of historical and current literature, student teacher candidates will be able to articulate, develop, and seek alternatives to their theories-in-use.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 101 Minimum Grade: D
EDTE 202 Community and Ethnography
3.00 credits
Using a variety of frameworks and tools, students will investigate the language and culture of carefully selected communities. Students will learn how to describe events without interpretation and work collaboratively to formulate possible hypotheses about cultures.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 200 Minimum Grade: D or MTSL 200 Minimum Grade: D
EDTE 204 Commnty Languages & Lng Acqstn
3.00 credits
Prerequisite:
EDTE 200 Minimum Grade: D or MTSL 200 Minimum Grade: D
EDTE 206 Community & Place-Based Eductn
3.00 credits
This course introduces students to foundational concepts in community and place-based education practices, with particular emphasis on theories and strategies that support the co-creation of K-12 and community-based educative experiences anchored in the unique contextual elements of place. Students will investigate and engage in local collective impact efforts that reflect a unique community context.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 202 Minimum Grade: D or MTSL 202 Minimum Grade: D
EDTE 213 NW History for Elem Teachers
1.00 credit
This one credit course is designed to provide undergraduate teacher candidates with the basic content of Washington State history. An emphasis will be placed on the use of technology, diversity and assessment. The history and geography EALR's/GLE's/PE's will be emphasized. Fall and Spring.
EDTE 221E Elem Dif Instruct & Assess
3.00 credits
This course is designed to integrate the planning, implementation, and assessment of instruction across content areas at the elementary level with a special emphasis on diversity. The major focus of this course will be meeting the learning needs of a diverse population which includes students from different racial, ethnic, ability, socio-economic status, language and sexual orientation backgrounds.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 101 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
EDTE 221L
EDTE 221L Field Experience
1.00 credit
Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to explore firsthand the instruction, assessment, and technology practices that are at work in schools. Candidates also gain pedagogical practice by working with students and teaching a lesson. Teacher candidates are required to submit a Field Experience Request form to the Field Experience Office a minimum of a month prior to the semester they are taking the course. This form can be found on Blackboard under Teacher Certification & Field Experience Materials Course. The field experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the classroom and travel by car may be required. In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 101 Minimum Grade: D and (EDTE 221E Minimum Grade: D or EDTE 221S Minimum Grade: D)
EDTE 221S Sec Diff Instruct & Assess
3.00 credits
This course is designed to integrate the planning, implementation, and assessment of instruction across content areas at the secondary level with a special emphasis on diversity. The major focus of this course will be meeting the learning needs of a diverse population which includes students from different racial, ethnic, ability, socio-economic status, language and sexual orientation backgrounds.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 101 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
EDTE 221L EDTE 241
EDTE 231 Instruct Meth:Rdg/Wrtg/Comm I
3.00 credits
The primary purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for teacher candidates to understand theoretical constructs related to reading, writing, and communication in classroom curriculum. Teacher candidates will develop pedagogy from an analysis of the processes of natural learning, language acquisition, multiple intelligence, and learning styles. This knowledge will become the framework for instructional methodology for reading, writing, and communication skills.
EDTE 241 Teaching in the Middle School
3.00 credits
The purpose of this course is to help the prospective middle level/secondary teacher candidate develop in-depth knowledge and understanding of early adolescents. The middle school reform movement and the developmental characteristics and needs of adolescents provide a framework for this course.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 101 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
EDTE 221L EDTE 221S
Upper Division
EDTE 302 Advocacy and Policy
3.00 credits
This class harnesses the power of language and engagement with communities through the lenses of inquiry and advocacy with a focus on action to bend the arc of the universe to become more moral and just. In it, we learn the basis for types of advocacy, advocacy planning, and how to take action based on your plan.
Prerequisite:
(EDTE 202 Minimum Grade: D or MTSL 202 Minimum Grade: D) and EDTE 206 Minimum Grade: D
EDTE 304 Concepts in Science
3.00 credits
This course presents earth, physical, and space science concepts for elementary teacher candidates.
EDTE 305 Intercultural Competence Devel
3.00 credits
This course addresses social justice by introducing students to a developmental process of acquiring cultural self-awareness, developing knowledge and skills that build intercultural competence, and engaging in meaningful reflective self-evaluation. lntercultural Competence involves a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support appropriate and effective interaction in a variety of cultural contexts (Bennett, J., 2008). This process begins with recognizing new perspectives about personal cultural beliefs, values, and assumptions; and exploring others' cultures and worldviews. The opportunity to understand the worldviews of others will occur through reading and discussion, learning from speakers representing a variety of cultural backgrounds, refugee simulation at World Relief Refugee Resettlement, and reflection.
EDTE 306 Crit Pedagogical Iss Amer Educ
3.00 credits
This course is designed to examine issues in education from the perspective of Native American students, and to provide educators with knowledge and skills that will increase their comfort level, competency and ability to work in schools where American Indian children and other diverse students are educated. Course content will include an overview of important historical and cultural factors, the study of current methods based on research and experiences of practitioners in the field, and a practicum in the development of effective educational strategies and materials, specifically the Washington State Since Time Immemorial curriculum.
EDTE 315E Classroom Assessmnt Elem Tchrs
3.00 credits
This course will introduce and practice the processes of assessing whether students are meeting desired classroom outcomes, addressing the question, "How do we know our students learned the material?" Multiple methods and types of classroom assessments will be analyzed and evaluated for the purposes of creating a systematic framework that implements, collects, and reviews assessment data. The following assessment components will be discussed, applied and evaluated: timely and appropriate feedback; formative, summative and diagnostic methodologies; classroom assessment instruments; self-assessment applications; clear criteria; scoring guides and rubrics; student voice; and content-specific assessment practices. Fall.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 221E Minimum Grade: D and EDTE 221L Minimum Grade: D
EDTE 315S Classroom Assessmnt Scdry Tchr
3.00 credits
This course will introduce and practice the processes of assessing whether students are meeting desired classroom outcomes, addressing the question, "How do we know our students learned the material?" Multiple methods and types of classroom assessments will be analyzed and evaluated for the purposes of creating a systematic framework that implements, collects, and reviews assessment data. The following assessment components will be discussed, applied and evaluated: timely and appropriate feedback; formative, summative and diagnostic methodologies; classroom assessment instruments; self-assessment applications; clear criteria; scoring guides and rubrics; student voice; and content-specific assessment practices. Spring.
Concurrent:
EDTE 418 EDTE 418L
EDTE 331 Instruct Meth:Rdg/Wrtg/Comm II
3.00 credits
The purpose of this course is twofold: one, to prepare teacher candidates to create appropriate lesson plans for literacy instruction and assessment in order to provide opportunities for children to become involved with literacy in a purposeful and meaningful manner. Second, to prepare teacher candidates to become aware and utilize available literary resources, including technology for teaching. An emphasis of this course will be the compatibility of methods of instruction and assessment with regard to Washington State Standards/Common Core Standards. Fall and Spring.
Concurrent:
EDTE 331L
EDTE 331L Field Experience
1.00 credit
Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to explore first-hand Literacy instruction, assessment, and technology practices that are at work in schools. This course will aid the teacher candidate to focus and integrate learning by observing, teaching, reflecting, and analyzing instructional events occurring at the school site. The course will enable the teacher candidate to observe and participate in instructional decision making, strategies for differentiation, and various assessment modes. Teacher candidates are required to submit a Field Experience Request form to the Field Experience office a minimum of a month prior to the semester they are taking the course. This form can be found on Blackboard under Teacher Certification & Field Experience Materials Course. The field experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the classroom and travel by car may be required. In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
Concurrent:
EDTE 331
EDTE 390 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
EDTE 400 Elementary Methods: Music
1.00 credit
This course presents theories and techniques appropriate to teaching Music in the elementary school.
EDTE 401 Elem Methods: Math
3.00 credits
This course is designed to prepare or teacher candidates for teaching Mathematics in an elementary classroom. Candidates will learn and apply content specific pedagogy, understand the mathematical practices, plan assessment to monitor student learning and foster a mathematical learning environment within the classroom.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 221E Minimum Grade: D and MATH 104 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
EDTE 401L
EDTE 401L Field Experience
1.00 credit
Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to explore first-hand mathematical instruction, assessment, and technology practices that are at work in schools. This course will aid the teacher candidate to focus and integrate learning by observing, teaching, reflecting, and analyzing instructional events occurring at the school site. The course will enable teacher candidate to observe and participate in instructional decision-making, strategies for differentiation, and various assessment modes. Teacher candidates are required to submit a Field Experience Request form to the Field Experience office a minimum of a month prior to the semester they are taking the course. This form can be found on Blackboard under Teacher Certification & Field Experience Materials Course. The field experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the classroom and travel by car may be required. In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
Concurrent:
EDTE 401
EDTE 402 Elementary Methods:Social Stdy
3.00 credits
This course presents theories and techniques appropriate to teaching Social Studies in the elementary school.
EDTE 403 Elementary Methods: Art
1.00 credit
This course presents theories and techniques appropriate for teaching Art in the elementary school.
EDTE 404 Elementary Methods: Science
3.00 credits
This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates for teaching Science in an elementary classroom. Candidates will understand how students learn and develop scientific knowledge, learn and apply content specific pedagogy, plan assessments to monitor student learning, and foster inquiry in the classroom learning environment.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 221E Minimum Grade: D and EDTE 304 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 181 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 181L Minimum Grade: D
EDTE 418 Discipline Specific Literacy
3.00 credits
This course presents the theory and practice for developing interdisciplinary literacy in secondary classrooms including the structure and development of language and its effective expression in specific disciplines are presented in this course. In particular, students gain competencies in working with texts, supporting academic language development, and adapting instruction to make it accessible to English language learners.
Concurrent:
EDTE 315S EDTE 418L
EDTE 418L Field Experience
1.00 credit
Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to explore the instruction, assessment, and technology practices that are at work in schools. Teacher candidates are required to submit a Field Experience Request form to the Field Experience office a minimum of a month prior to the semester they are taking the course. This form can be found on on Blackboard under Teacher Certification & Field Experience Materials Course. . The field experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the classroom and travel by car may be required. In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
Concurrent:
EDTE 315S EDTE 418
EDTE 454D Secondary Meth- Theater Arts
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements.
Concurrent:
EDTE 454L EDTE 460S
EDTE 454E Secondary Methods-English
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements.
Concurrent:
EDTE 454L EDTE 460S
EDTE 454F Secondary Methods-Social Study
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements.
Concurrent:
EDTE 454L EDTE 460S
EDTE 454L Field Experience
1.00 credit
Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to explore firsthand the instruction, assessment, and technology practices that are at work in schools. This course will aid the teacher candidate to focus and integrate learning by observing, teaching, reflecting, and analyzing instructional events occurring at the school site. This course will enable teacher candidates to observe and participate in instructional decision-making, strategies for differentiation, and various assessment models. Teacher candidates are required to submit a Field Experience Request form to the Field Experience office a minimum of a month prior to the semester they are taking the course. This form can be found on Blackboard under Teacher Certification & Field Experience Materials Course. . The field experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the classroom and travel by car may be required. In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and . In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file. Fall Only.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 454F or EDTE 454M or EDTE 454S or EDTE 454E or EDTE 454T EDTE 454D
Concurrent:
EDTE 460S
EDTE 454M Secondary Methods-Math
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements.
Concurrent:
EDTE 454L EDTE 460S
EDTE 454S Secondary Methods-Science
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements.
Concurrent:
EDTE 454L EDTE 460S
EDTE 454T Secondary Methods-World Lang
3.00 credits
Discipline Specific Methods address strategies, assessment, and student activities in the academic areas approved for endorsements.
Concurrent:
EDTE 454L EDTE 460S
EDTE 455L Fld Exp:Additional Endorsement
1.00 credit
This is a lab course which will accommodate teacher candidates who add-on an additional endorsement. Teacher candidates are required to complete a Field Experience request form prior to taking this course which can be found on the Gonzaga School of Education website under Field Experience. This course must be taken concurrently with an EDTE 454 Discipline Specific Methods course. The field experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the classroom and travel by car may be required. In addition, current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and a Character and Fitness form on file is required. Fall only.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 454E or EDTE 454F or EDTE 454D or EDTE 454M or EDTE 454S or EDTE 454T
EDTE 460E Clasrm Mgt & Comm Elem
3.00 credits
Teacher candidates are provided with strategies to manage the elementary classroom to create a motivated classroom climate, to communicate with teacher candidates, parents, school, and community agencies, and to deal effectively with problem situations, management, instructional approaches, and corrective measures. Teacher as leader will be the primary metaphor which requires candidates to investigate the role of power and communication in teaching.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 221E Minimum Grade: D and EDTE 221L Minimum Grade: D
EDTE 460S Classroom Management Secondary
3.00 credits
Teacher candidates are provided with strategies to manage the secondary classroom, to create a motivated classroom climate, to communicate with student teacher candidates, parents, school, and community agencies, and to deal effectively with problem situations, management, instructional approaches, and corrective measures. Teacher as leader will be the primary metaphor which requires candidates to investigate the role of power and communication in teaching.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 221S Minimum Grade: D and EDTE 221L Minimum Grade: D and EDTE 241 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
EDTE 454L
EDTE 461 Reading Diagnosis
3.00 credits
This course provides teacher candidates with the in-depth knowledge and skills to identify and diagnose reading strengths and deficiencies of K-12 students. Appropriate instructional strategies for remediation and extension are developed. This class incorporates field experience components. Spring only.
EDTE 462 Child and Adol Literature
3.00 credits
This course surveys classical and contemporary literary works for children and youth, preschool-early adolescent. Assessment and teaching strategies for the utilization of literature across the K-12 curriculum are presented. Fall only.
EDTE 464 Practicum-Reading
1.00 credit
This course creates and applies literacy instruction assessment strategies in a K-12 classroom setting. A school location is arranged. Practicum requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via Zagweb. 1 credit = 30 contact hours.
EDTE 466 Literacy for Engl Lang Learner
3.00 credits
This course provides literacy knowledge related to working with English Language Learners. Teacher candidates will create classroom materials for K-12 learners to support their literacy and language development. Students will develop knowledge translated into practical application through the creation of lesson plans, instructional materials and tutoring.
EDTE 469 The Five Themes of Geography
3.00 credits
This course is an introduction to the five themes of geography, location, place, human environment interaction, movement, regions. This course fulfills the geography requirement for a Social Studies endorsement. Spring only.
EDTE 490 Directed Reading
1.00- 4.00 credits
Directed Reading requires completion of a form, and Department permission.
EDTE 491 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Individualized study that is designed by the professor. Student teacher candidates follow a prescribed course outline.
EDTE 492 Independent Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Individualized study that is designed by the student teacher candidate in consultation with the professor. Self-directed learning in a selected area of interest is the process employed. Professor serves as resource.
EDTE 494 Special Project
1.00- 6.00 credits
Individualized study that is project-based. The study results in a practical application of educational theory. The project or a written report of the project is submitted to the professor for evaluation.
EDTE 495 Student Teaching Prof Seminar
2.00 credits
Prerequisite:
EDTE 496E Minimum Grade: D or EDTE 496S Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
EDSE 450
EDTE 496E Elementary Student Teaching
12.00 credits
This is a culminating 16 week capstone experience in which the teacher candidate assumes the full responsibility of an elementary teacher under the direction of a University supervisor and a co-operating teacher. Seminars are provided for student interaction, problem solving, certification requirements, and informational support. Current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
Concurrent:
EDSE 450 EDTE 495
EDTE 496S Secondary Student Teaching
12.00 credits
This is a culminating 16 week capstone experience in which the teacher candidate assumes the full responsibility of a secondary teacher under the direction of a University supervisor and a co-operating teacher. Seminars are provided for student interaction, problem solving, certification requirements, and informational support. Current fingerprint clearance from the WSP and FBI throughout the semester and Pre-Residency Clearance is on file.
Concurrent:
EDSE 450 EDTE 495
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.