Brand and Trademark

To unfold is a delicate but deliberate process. And it’s something that happens every single day on our 152-acre campus, for our students around the world, in the careers and lives of our alums, and yes, even on the basketball court in the McCarthey Athletic Center. This process is an important part of our story. In fact, it is the promise we make to those we serve – first and foremost, our students.

Gonzaga prides itself on meeting students where they are; taking the time to learn and understand the unique passions and talents with which they arrive on campus. An academic approach grounded in our Catholic, Jesuit tradition, supported by a community that is both embracing and challenging and delivered by expert faculty dedicated to teaching allows for new possibilities to emerge and for passions to transform into purpose.

Our story is your story.

Official Gonzaga Tartan

 

In 2013, Dr. Peggy Sue Loroz’s Marketing 490 Promotion Project class developed a signature tartan for Gonzaga University. Students worked side by side with community members and Gonzaga to develop a design reflective of Gonzaga’s history and mission. The tartan was chosen through a voting process of Gonzaga students, alumni, and various community members. It is named "True Blue and White" and is registered with the Scottish Register of Tartans. A portion of the proceeds from Collegiate Tartan Apparel sales will fund instructional needs or student scholarships in the School of Business Administration.

There are four elements of the design that represent our heritage:

•    Blue/White represent Gonzaga’s official colors, which are a tribute to the Virgin Mary

•    Red crosses represent Gonzaga's Catholic faith tradition, incorporating one of Gonzaga's accent colors

•    White lines represent not only the Holy Trinity but also cura personalis, Gonzaga's philosophy of the development and education of the whole person – mind, body and spirit

•    Green represents the Italian and Irish cultural heritage of Gonzaga’s founder, Father Joseph Cataldo, and the first students who attended Gonzaga. Not only that, but the first school mascot was the Fighting Irish