Adam W. Stivers, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Dr. Stivers joined Gonzaga University in 2016 and he administers the Social Dilemma Lab. His main research focus is on how personality, social situations, and cultural factors influence human cooperation in social dilemmas. Other research areas include...

Adam Stivers

Contact Information

Education & Curriculum Vitae

Ph.D., Psychology, University of Delaware

M.A., Psychology, University of Delaware

B.A., Psychology, Michigan State University

B.A., Economics, Michigan State University

B.A., Political Science, Michigan State University


Dr. Stivers joined Gonzaga University in 2016 and he administers the Social Dilemma Lab. His main research focus is on how personality, social situations, and cultural factors influence human cooperation in social dilemmas. Other research areas include personality measurement, personality judgments (based on facial photos), and improving student’s academic achievement through training in non-cognitive abilities. This research involves collaborative work with students at Gonzaga and colleagues in many countries including Poland, the Netherlands, Spain, China, and Japan. For half of the summer, Dr. Stivers works as a visiting instructor at the University of Warsaw in Poland.

Jing, Y., Gries, P. H., Li, Y., Stivers, A. W., Mifune, N., Kuhlman, D. M., & Bai,, L. (2017). War or peace? How the subjective perception of great power interdependence shapes preemptive defensive aggression. Frontiers in Psychology, 30 (864), 1-15. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00864

Eriksson, K., Strimling, P., Andersson, P. A., Stivers, A. W., Aveyard, M., Brauer, M.,…Yamagishi, T. (in press). Cultural universals and cultural differences in meta-norms about peer punishment. Management and Organization Review.

Rossier, J., Aluja, A., Blanch, A., Barry, O., Hansenne, M., Stivers, A. W., … Karagonlar, G. (2016). Cross-cultural generalizability of the alternative five-factor model using the Zuckerman-Kuhlman-Aluja Personality Questionnaire. European Journal of Personality, 30, 139-157. doi:10.1002/per.2045