Emily Clark, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

Dr. Emily Clark specializes in race and religion in the Americas. She believes in student-centered pedagogy, regularly takes her classes into the campus archives, and is co-director of the Gonzaga Digital Humanities Initiative. Her first book, A Luminous...

Profile Photo of Professor Emily Clark

Contact Information

Education & Curriculum Vitae

Ph.D., Religion; Florida State University

M.A., Religious Studies; University of Missouri

B.A., Religious Studies; Austin College

Curriculum Vitae

Courses Taught

RELI 193 FYS: Race in America

RELI 193 FYS: American Monsters

RELI 225 African American Religions

RELI 250 American Christianities

RELI 356 Native American Religions

RELI 499 Senior Seminar

UNIV 099 Strategies for Success


Dr. Emily Clark specializes in race and religion in the Americas. She believes in student-centered pedagogy, regularly takes her classes into the campus archives, and is co-director of the Gonzaga Digital Humanities Initiative. Her first book, A Luminous Brotherhood: Afro-Creole Spiritualism in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans (University of North Carolina Press, 2016; Winner 2017 Francis B. Simkins Award), explores the racial and religious politics of talking to the dead. She also serves as Associate Editor for the Journal of Southern Religion.

Books

A Luminous Brotherhood: Afro-Creole Spiritualism in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans (University of North Carolina Press, 2016).
Awards: Francis B. Simkins Award 2017, Southern Historical Association
Michael Thomason Book Award 2017, Gulf South Historical Association
CHOICE Reviews, Outstanding Academic Title 2017

Co-editor with Brad Stoddard, Race and New Religious Movements in America: A Documentary Reader (under contract and forthcoming with Bloomsbury Publishing).

Co-editor with Rachel Lindsey, Introduction to Digital Humanities: Material Religion (forthcoming with De Gruyter).

Select Articles and Book Chapters

"'To battle for human rights': Afro-Creole Spiritualism and Martyrdom," Journal of Africana Religions, accepted and forthcoming 2018.

"African American Religions in the 19th Century," Oxford Handbook of Religion and Race in American History, Paul Harvey and Kathryn Gin Lum, eds., (New York: Oxford

University Press, 2018).

"Religion and Race in America," (10,000 words) in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of American History, Jon Butler, ed., published online 2017.

"Alternative Religious Movements and Race," (10,000 words) in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Religion in America, John Corrigan, ed., published online 2017, forthcoming in print (New York: Oxford University Press, 2018).

"New World, New Jerusalem, New Orleans: The Apocalyptic Art of Sister Gertrude Morgan," Louisiana History: The Journal of the Louisiana Historical Association, 55.4 (December 2014): 432–459.

"Noble Drew Ali's 'Clean and Pure Nation': The Moorish Science Temple, Identity, and Healing," Nova Religio: The Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions, 16.3 (February 2013): 31–51.

"Creoles, Catholics, and Color Lines," Journal of Africana Religions, 2.2 (April 2014): 263–270.

"The Center for the Study of Southern Religion and Culture: A Historiographical Analysis," Journal of Southern Religion, Volume 14, 2012.

My research specialization lies at the intersection of religion and race in the Americas. I am particularly interested in African American religions, American Catholic history, Native American religions, religious material culture, colonialism, and haunting. Other areas of research interest include digital humanities and student-centered pedagogy.