Ann M. Ciasullo, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of English; Powers Chair of the Humanities

Ann earned her M.A. from Washington State University and her Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky. Her areas of expertise include literary theory and cultural studies, 19th and 20th century American literature, women writers, feminist theory, and popular...

Profile photo of Professor Ciasullo

Contact Information

  • Spring 2018
    Monday: 1 p.m.-2 p.m.
    Tuesday: 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
    Wednesday: 1 p.m.-2 p.m.

  • 509-313-5955

Education & Curriculum Vitae

Ph.D., English, Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies, University of Kentucky

Graduate, School of Criticism and Theory, Cornell University

M.A., English Literature, Washington State University

B.A., English and French, Gonzaga University

Courses Taught

ENGL 480: Literary and Cultural Studies

ENGL 466: Studies in Women Writers

ENGL 414: 20th Century American Novel

ENGL 230: Survey of American Literature

ENGL 202: Studies in Fiction

ENGL 193: FYS: Freaks, Geeks, and Outsiders

ENGL 105: Themes in Literature: Sexual Politics


Ann earned her M.A. from Washington State University and her Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky.  Her areas of expertise include literary theory and cultural studies, 19th and 20th century American literature, women writers, feminist theory, and popular culture.  She has published on a wide range of topics, including women-in-prison narratives, bromance films, the television series Mad Men, theories of the women’s movement in the 1970s, and social justice in American literature 

Publications

“‘This is what I’ve always wanted: Bromance and the Evolution of Male Intimacy in the Jump Street Films.”  With David M. Magill.  Interactions: Studies in Communication and Culture 6.3 (December 2015): 303-322.

“Strained Sisterhood: Lesbianism, Feminism, and the U.S. Women’s Liberation Movement.”  In Provocations: A Transnational Reader in the History of Feminist Thought, ed. Susan Bordo, Ellen Rosenman, and M. Cristina Alcade. Oakland: University of California Press, 2015.  292-300.

“The Lighter—and Weightier—Side of Mad: or Everything I Needed to Know about Gender and Sexuality I Learned from Dave Berg.”  Studies in American Humor 3.30 (2014): 77-94.

“Not a Spaceship, but a Time Machine: Mad Men and the Narratives of Nostalgia.” Lucky Strikes and a Three-Martini Lunch: Thinking about Television's Mad Men, ed. Jennifer Dunn and Jimmie Manning.  Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012. 14-26.

“What Do a Meaningless Secretary and a Humorless Bitch Have in Common?  Everything. Or: Joan, Peggy, and the Convergence of Mad Men’s Career Girls.” Mad Men, Women, and Children, ed. Heather Marcovitch and Nancy Batty.  Lanham: Lexington Books, 2012. 19-31.

“Containing ‘Deviant’ Desire: Lesbianism, Heterosexuality, and the Women-in-Prison Narrative,” The Journal of Popular Culture 41.2 (2008): 195-223.  

“Making Her (In)Visible: Cultural Representations of Lesbianism and the Lesbian Body in the 1990s,” Feminist Studies 27.3 (Fall 2001): 577-608.  Reprinted in The Gender and Media Reader, ed. Mary Celeste Kearney.  New York and London: Routledge, 2012. 329-343.  

Contributor to The St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, ed. Tom and Sara Pendergast (Detroit: St. James Press, 2000): 292-294.  

 

Book Reviews

Approaches to Teaching Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, ed. Jackson R. Bryer and Nancy P. VanArsdale.  Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature 64.1 (Spring 2010).  Online.

Hemingway and Women: Female Critics and the Female Voice, ed. Lawrence R. Broer and Gloria Holland.  Cultural Analysis 5 (2006): R7-R11.

Visual Pedagogy: Media Cultures in and beyond the Classroom by Brian Goldfarb.  Feminist Teacher 15.2 (2005): 161-162.

Lesbian Panic: Homoeroticism and Modern British Women’s Literature by Patricia Juliana Smith and The Lesbian Menace: Ideology, Identity, and the Representation of Lesbian Life by Sherrie A. Inness.  Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature 17.2 (Fall 1998): 371-375.