Kirk Anders, Ph.D.

Professor of Biology, Department Chair

I am interested in genes, chromosomes, and genomes: how they contribute to the traits of an organism, how they are transmitted during replication or cell division, and how they can change from generation to generation. My research makes use of viruses...

Kirk Anders

Contact Information

Education & Curriculum Vitae

Ph.D. Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1997

B.A. Biology, Whitman College, 1987

Curriculum Vitae

Courses Taught

BIOL 105 - Information Flow in Biological Systems

BIOL 105L - Phage Discovery Lab

BIOL 106 - Energy Flow in Biological Systems

BIOL 207/L - Genetics and Lab

BIOL 337 - Developmental Biology

BIOL 399 - Advanced Topic: Genomic Medicine


I am interested in genes, chromosomes, and genomes: how they contribute to the traits of an organism, how they are transmitted during replication or cell division, and how they can change from generation to generation. My research makes use of viruses that infect bacteria, and my students and I use molecular biology and bioinformatics methods to make discoveries about the diversity of viruses in the world, how the virus genes work, and how the viruses may evolve. I am passionate about helping students develop into thinkers who know how to use their knowledge, their curiosity, and their creativity to solve mysteries and create solutions to problems.
 
I am interested in genes, chromosomes, and genomes: how they contribute to the traits of an organism, how they are transmitted during replication or cell division, and how they can change from generation to generation. To study genes and genomes, my research makes use of a group of newly-discovered viruses that infect bacteria. We have been pursuing two kinds of projects:

1. The first project is in the structural and evolutionary analysis of phage genomes. A number of interesting phages have been discovered at Gonzaga that need to be analyzed and published so that the scientific community can make use of them. I am recruiting students to analyze and annotate phage genomes using bioinformatics methods, and to do quality control on annotations from BIOL 207L students. This project has the potential for lead authorship of a manuscript for publication. Click HERE for an example. Later molecular biology bench work may be possible for students particularly interested in pursuing their findings.

2. [I am not taking additional students for this project in 2019.]  If bacteriophages are ever going to be effectively used as anti-bacterial therapies, we will need to know how to control all aspects of a phage’s activities, especially how a phage expresses its genes during infection. This project is therefore aimed at the question, “How do viruses control the expression of their genes?” To answer this question, we are cloning pieces of DNA from O cluster phages and testing them to see if they have properties that promote transcription of mRNA. Characterization of these promoters should give insights into their function, their properties, and their evolution.