Native American Studies Campus Events

Upcoming Events

 Image for 10 year commemoration of NTAS program

Artwork by Emma Noyes (Sinixt), created in commemoration of 10 years of Native American Studies at Gonzaga

The Sinixt Confederacy: Rights, People, Stories

October 29 at 6:00 p.m. 
Gonzaga University Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center

This event is free and open to the public. Tickets are available here and will also be available at the door.

People of the Sinixt Confederacy have lived on and stewarded Sinixt homelands since their first day. Currently, those homelands are located within the state of Washington and the province of British Columbia. 

Join author Eileen Delehanty Pearkes and film maker Derrick LaMere (Rocky Boy/Sinixt/Little Shell/Entiat/Wenatchi) for our inaugural NTAS10 event!

We will screen LaMere's recently completed film Older than the Crown and celebrate the 20th anniversary edition of Pearkes's book Geography of Memory

  • At 6pm - Join author Eileen Delehanty Pearkes and Sinixt co-authors for readings from Geography of Memory followed by discussions of Sinixt rights and stories. 
  • After intermission (around 7:45pm) - We will screen film maker Derrick LaMere's (Rocky Boy/Sinixt/Little Shell/Entiat/Wenatchi) recently completed film Older than the Crown followed by a Q&A with the film maker.

This program is presented by Native American Studies and sponsored in part by the Robert K. and Ann J. Powers Chair of the Humanities. 



Image for 10 year commemoration of NTAS program

 Artwork by Emma Noyes (Sinixt), created in commemoration of 10 years of Native American Studies at Gonzaga

Coyote Made the Rivers: Indigenous Ecology and the Sacred Geography of Song

Presented by Chad S. Hamill/čnaq’ymi (Spokane Descendent)

November 2nd at 6:00 p.m. 
Gonzaga University Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center

This event is free and open to the public. Tickets are available here and will also be available at the door.

For millennia, the waterways of the Columbia Plateau have shaped the lifeways of its people, providing sustenance and an ecological framework for social engagement and cohesion. Not long after the Lewis and Clark expedition made its way through the Plateau, that framework was methodically disassembled. The treaties of the mid 19th century severely limited the movement of Plateau tribes, leading to fixed and stagnant communities. The dams curtailed the natural movement of the rivers, obstructing salmon and poisoning the lifeblood of the People.
 
With a blend of music, visual imagery, storytelling, and research, this piece of holistic scholarship will utilize Coyote stories about the Columbia River and its tributaries as a springboard for examining the current state of river health. In addition, it will explore the ways in which Native nations in the region have exercised resilience and resistance in maintaining their relationship with our ancestral homelands. Emphasizing traditions not dissimilar from those in other Indigenous communities, the objective will be to illuminate perspectives that take on added urgency in the era of climate change.
 
Chad S. Hamill/čnaq’ymi’s scholarship is focused on song traditions of the Interior Northwest, including those carried by his Spokane ancestors. In addition to his book, Songs of Power and Prayer in the Columbia Plateau, he has produced numerous articles centered on Columbia Plateau songs and ceremony, exploring topics ranging from sovereignty to Indigenous ecological knowledge. Prior to his role as Vice President for Native American Initiatives at Northern Arizona University, Hamill served as Chair of the Department of Applied Indigenous Studies at NAU and as Chair of the Indigenous Music Section of the Society for Ethnomusicology. Currently, he is Executive Director of Indigenous Arts and Expression at California Institute of the Arts and is Vice President and Treasurer of the Spokane Language House, a 501c3 that contributes to the sustainability of the Spokane language.
 
This program is presented by Native American Studies and sponsored in part by the Robert K. and Ann J. Powers Chair of the Humanities. 

 

Land Acknowledgement Exhibit

Land Acknowledgement: A Contemporary Art Exhibition Featuring Seventeen Contemporary Native American Artists Curated by Charlene Teters

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with "Land Acknowledgement" artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 - December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

This event is sponsored in part by Gonzaga's Native American Studies Program and the William L. Davis, S.J. Lecture Fund.  

For more information, please contact the Gonzaga University Department of Art at susens@gonzaga.edu .

 


Previous Events

2019-2020

Paulette Jordan, Documentary From the Campaign Trail Running For Governor of Idaho

Oct 29, 2019
Wolff Auditorium, Gonzaga University

Paulette Jordan will showed her documentary film from the campaign trail when she was running for governor of Idaho. She followed that up with a short talk and a Q&A.

 
Portrait of Paullette Jordan of the Coeur d' Alene Nation.

About Paulette Jordan

Paulette Jordan, Idaho’s 2018 democratic gubernatorial candidate and first woman nominated to the position by a major party, is a proud member of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. She is recognized in Idaho and across the nation as an inspirational and audacious leader. A descendant of Indigenous Chiefs, Paulette was raised to fight for the needs of her community and to protect the earth’s priceless natural resources. Growing up on a north Idaho farm and learning from her elders about land cultivation and preservation, she developed a strong connection to Idaho’s land and the people who share it. In 2008, after graduating from the University of Washington, Paulette returned home to Idaho and became the youngest person elected to the Coeur d’Alene Tribal Council.

 

History of the Spokane Tribe of Indians

October 14, 2019
Cataldo Hall, Gonzaga University

We walked through 250 years of Plateau history in the footsteps of Spokane tribal people as they encounter traders, missionaries, soldiers and others arriving from far off lands.

 
Decorative Image

 

Hosted by:
Warren Seyler
Former Chairman of Spokane Tribe of Indians

Margo Hill
Spokane Tribe of Indians
Professor at Eastern Washington University

Contributing Speakers:

Jack Nisbet: Teacher, Naturalist, Author
Donald Cutler: Historian and Author
Mahlon Kriebel: Historian and Author

For more information, please contact:
Warren Seyler
wseyler@spokanetribe.com
(509) 626-4422
Find me on Facebook: Warren Seylerhistrory

 

 

 


2017-2018

#InsteadofRedFace

Instead of Red Face: An Evening with DeLanna Studi

Join award-winning actor and activist DeLanna Studi (Cherokee) for short performance pieces and a discussion of the importance of Native voices directly represented in all levels of storytelling. #Insteadofredface illustrates the Native and Indigenous artists who are writing/performing Native/Indigenous stories.

DeLanna Studi wrote and directed And So We Walked: An Artist’s Journey along the Trail of Tears, which opens March 31, 2018 at Portland Center Stage at the Armory. Studi has performed in numerous television, film, and theatre roles, is a member of the Artists Ensemble for Native Voices at the Autry, and mentors artists of all ages.

February 26, 2017
Wolff Auditorium, Gonzaga University
This event is free and open to the public.

Instead of Red Face: An Evening with Mary Kathryn Nagle

Join playwright/activist/attorney Mary Kathryn Nagle (Cherokee) for short performance pieces and a discussion of the importance of Native voices directly represented in all levels of storytelling. #Insteadofredface illustrates the Native and Indigenous artists who are writing/performing Native/Indigenous stories.

Mary Kathryn Nagle has written numerous plays and has two plays in production in 2018, Sovereignty at the Arena Stage in Washington, D.C. (on now), and Manahatta at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (opening April 1). She also recently received a United States Artist Award, a prize given in recognition of an artist's contribution to their discipline.

March 19, 2018
Wolff Auditorium, Gonzaga University
This event is free and open to the public.

#InsteadofRedFace is sponsored by: Gonzaga's Native American Studies Program, the Departments of History and Women's and Gender Studies, DICE (Diversity, Inclusion, Cultural Engagement), the Center for American Indian Studies, the Faculty Senate Speakers Series, and the College of Arts and Sciences Deans Office.

“They Are Always at the Front: Native American Soldiers in the Great War,” Ryan Booth (Upper Skagit)


2016-2017

“Native American Studies and Intercultural Communication,” Professor Pavel Shlossberg, Communication Leadership

“Native American Studies and History,” Professor Ann Ostenfdorf, Department of History 

“Matika Wilbur: 25 Lessons from Indian Roads”

"Weaving Native American Plateau Art into the Fabric of Spokane: A Town Hall Event,” in collaboration with Artist Trust

“Native American Studies and Biology,” Professor Brook Swanson, Department of Biology

“Native American Studies and Political Science,” Professor Michael Treleaven, Department of Political Science

“Native American Studies and Religious Studies,” Professor Emily Clark, Department of Religious Studies

“Native American Studies and Contemporary Literature,” Professor Jessica Maucione, Department of English


2015-2016

Film Screening, Cherokee Word for Water, featuring a discussion with actor Kimberly Norris Guerrero (Colville/Salish-Kootenai/Cherokee)

“Enacting Social Justice for the Columbia River,” Upper Columbia United Tribes

“From Assimilation to Cultural Reclamation: Native American Education, 1880-2015,” presented to the Gonzaga Guild, Professor Laurie Arnold (Colville), Native American Studies

“Material Culture and Crafting Identity: Indigenous Arts in the U.S. and Mexico,” Professor Laurie Arnold (Colville) and Professor Pavel Shlossberg, Communication Leadership

“Nike N7 and Native Athletes in the 21st Century,” Sam McCracken (Assiniboine/Sioux)

“Finding Mourning Dove’s Authentic Voice in Letters and Manuscripts,” Professor Laurie Arnold (Colville), Native American Studies

“Living in History: For Indian Country the 2016 Election Will Be One for the Books,” Mark Trahant (Shoshone-Bannock)


2014-2015

Todd Harder (Creek), “Native American Youth Health Through Sports”

Cornel Pewewardy (Comanche), “Why Society Can’t Ignore Indian Mascots”

“According to Coyote” Salish School of Spokane event

Ric Gendron: Rattlebone (Jundt Museum)

Mythbusting! with Native American Studies Professor Laurie Arnold (Colville), Native American Studies

Michael Holloman (Colville), “Clyfford Still and the Nespelem Art Colony”


2013-2014

Sandy Osawa (Makah), film screening of her documentary “Maria Tallchief”

Rosalyn LaPier (Blackfeet), “Conceptualizing ‘Wilderness:’ Native American Land Customs vs. Federal Ideals of ‘Wild”

Ethics and the Columbia River Treaty Conference 

Want to connect with the Native American Studies Department?

Send a message
502 E. Boone Avenue, AD Box 37
Spokane, WA 99258