Courses

CRES 101 Intro to Race & Ethnic Studies
3.00 credits
This course will introduce students to key theories and debates within the field of race and ethnic studies. Students will analyze definitions of race and ethnicity, both inside and outside of the United States; cultural practices of resistance; various theories central to race and ethnic studies; the intersection of race with other forms of difference such as gender, class, and sexuality; and the connections between social justice and community engagement in ethnic studies. Students will read a variety of academic and cultural texts which illustrate the interdisciplinary scope in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies. Students will explore the course topics and issues through readings, discussions, lectures, films, short stories, and music.
CRES 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
CRES 201 Race and Popular Culture
3.00 credits
This course will focus on the historical and contemporary popular culture representations of race in the United States. In particular, we will examine stereotypes, archetypes, and caricatures of People of Color in the U.S., in order to better understand the historical roots of these images as well as their pervasiveness in contemporary representation. We will also examine the impact of these representations, discussing how stereotypes and archetypes both shape and reflect structural inequalities.
CRES 202 Racing Space and Place
3.00 credits
This course will examine the historical and contemporary relationship among race, ethnicity, power, and space in the U.S. We will explore issues such as segregation, sub/urban planning, housing, imperialism, immigration, policing and incarceration, and others in order to better understand how race, racism, and discrimination shape the physical layout of the nation-state and the lived experiences of People of Color.
CRES 280 Special Topics
3.00 credits
Explores material of timely, special, or unusual interest not contained in the regular course offerings.
CRES 301 Intersectionality and Race
3.00 credits
Framed through the lens of intersectionality, or what key theorist Kimberle Crenshaw describes as “a heuristic term to focus attention on the vexed dynamics of difference and the solidarities of sameness in the context of antidiscrimination and social movement politics,” this course examines the impact of Intersectionality Theory as a major framework in the field of Critical Race and Ethnic Studies. While Intersectionality Theory and its theoretical and practical antecedents are used in a variety of disciplines, it has particular centrality in CRES and the intellectual and social movements that led to the development of this field. Furthermore, Intersectionality has shaped the theoretical and methodological foci of CRES, producing both pedagogy and scholarship that centralizes a critical, multi-axis approach to racial inequity.
CRES 302 Race, Resistance, &Resillience
3.00 credits
This course will examine the dual roles of resistance and resilience in historical and contemporary struggles for social change and social justice centered around race and racial inequity. Throughout the semester, we will focus on understanding, comparing, and contrasting core ideological frameworks present in social justice organizing to interpret their strengths, weaknesses and overall impact on achieving racial equity and justice. We will also consider the tactics used in various movements, again considering their utility and impact as well as how they have been replicated and modified. Finally, we will consider the possibilities of methods of resistance that did not necessarily arise as part of a social movement, but contributed to the well-being and survival of individuals and communities of Color.
CRES 380 Special Topics
3.00 credits
Selected topics in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies.
CRES 390 Independent Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
To be determined by the faculty.
CRES 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world"? by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world. The capstone course in the critical race and ethnic studies program provides an opportunity for a special kind of faculty and student conversation. Responsibility for organizing and structuring this course will rotate among CRES faculty. Topics will vary. Regardless of the text or topics, the goal will be to create a conversation in which students assume significant responsibilities. All students are expected to complete a major research project using the concepts and perspectives of CRES scholarship, and to present their work to the class and faculty evaluators. Spring.
CRES 490 Independent Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
To be determined by faculty.
CRES 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional experience in a related field. Students must take the initiative to contact an agency or business and find a faculty member willing to supervise the internship. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
CRES 499 Symposium
3.00 credits
This capstone course in the Critical Race and Ethnic Studies program provides an opportunity for a special kind of faculty and student conversation. Responsibility for organizing and structuring this course will rotate among CRES faculty. Topics will vary. Regardless of the text or topics, the goal will be to create a conversation in which students assume significant responsibilities. All students are expected to complete a major research project using the concepts and perspectives of CRES scholarship, and to present their work to the class and faculty evaluators. Spring.
Prerequisite:
CRES 101 Minimum Grade: D

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502 E. Boone Ave
Spokane, WA 99258