Sarah N. Arpin, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Sarah Arpin is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Gonzaga University, and leads the Social Emotions, Relationships, and Health Research Lab. She received her Ph.D. in Applied Psychology from Portland State University in 2015, with a major in Social...

Sarah Arpin

Contact Information

  • Fall 2018
    Monday: 10 a.m.-11 a.m.
    Tuesday: 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
    Wednesday: 10 a.m.-11 a.m.

  • 509-313-6604

Education & Curriculum Vitae

Ph.D., Applied Psychology, Portland State University, 2015

M.S., Applied Psychology, Portland State University, 2012

B.A., Psychology, Gonzaga University, 2010

Curriculum Vitae

Courses Taught

PSYC 101 - General Psychology

PSYC 207 - Research Methods

PSYC 207L - Research Methods Lab

PSYC 206 - Scientific Principles in Psychology

PSYC 335 - Social Psychology

PSYC 458 - Social Relationships and Health


Sarah Arpin is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Gonzaga University, and leads the Social Emotions, Relationships, and Health Research Lab. She received her Ph.D. in Applied Psychology from Portland State University in 2015, with a major in Social Psychology and a minor in Quantitative Methods. She received her M.S. in Applied Psychology from Portland State University in 2012, and her B.A. in Psychology from Gonzaga University in 2010.

Dr. Arpin’s research focuses broadly on the intersection of social relationships and health. One particular area of focus has been on the experience of loneliness, and the impact of loneliness on social interactions, social decision-making, and health behavior (e.g., alcohol use). She has explored these processes via daily surveys, online surveys, and experimental lab-based methods. Dr. Arpin also studies intimate relationships, and the interdependence of emotions and health behavior within romantic couples. A current line of her research explores associations among self-disclosure, loneliness and sleep within romantic couples.

As an applied social psychologist, Dr. Arpin also seeks to engage with the Spokane community in her work. Dr. Arpin is currently collaborating with a colleague, Dr. Monica Bartlett, in a daily study of loneliness, gratitude, and health among older adults living in independent living facilities in the greater Spokane area.

 Arpin, S. N., Starkey, A., Mohr, C. D., Greenhalgh, A., & Hammer, L. (2018). A well spent day brings happy sleep: Findings from a dyadic study of capitalization support in military connected couples. Journal of Family Psychology.
 
Arpin S. N., & Mohr, C.D. (2018). Experimental investigation of loneliness and the perceived provision and receipt of responsive behavior within capitalization interactions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Arpin, S. N., Froehlich, L., Lantian, A., Rudert, S., Stelter, M. (2017). When “we” or “they” exclude others: Attributing and evaluating ostracism observed in ingroups and outgroups. Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology. 

Mohr, C., Arpin, S., McCabe, C., & Haverly, S. (2016). Capitalization and alcohol use: A moderated mediation model of relationship status, positive-event disclosure, drinking motives and alcohol consumption. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Arpin, S. N., Mohr, C. D, & Brannan, D. (2015). Having friends and feeling lonely: A daily process examination of transient loneliness, drinking behavior, and the influence of interpersonal relationships. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

McCabe, C. M., Arpin, S. N. & Mohr, C. D. (2015). Perceived Responsiveness, Stress, and Coping in the Workplace. In A. Stamatios Antoniou & C. Cooper (Eds.) Coping, Personality and the Workplace: Responding to Psychological Crisis and Critical Events. Gower Publishing.

Mohr, C. D., Arpin, S. N. & McCabe, C. (2015). Daily affect variability and context-specific consumption. Drug and Alcohol Review.

Sinclair, R., Cheung, J., Arpin, S., & Mohr, C. (2015). Personal Benefits of Strong Organizational and Community Ties: Well-being, Engagement and Retention. Special issue of the Journal of Community Psychology: Organizational Theory in Community Contexts.