Gonzaga University

Gonzaga University | 502 East Boone Avenue | Spokane, WA 99258-0102 | (800) 986.9585



Courses


Courses in the introductory majors sequence are open to Biology majors only, or by permission from the Department. Some courses are specifically designed to fulfill the core curriculum requirements for non-science majors and do not count toward the Biology major.These include: Human Ecology (BIOL 123 and BIOL 123L), Field Botany (BIOL 140 and BIOL 140L), Field Studies in Biodiversity (BIOL 159), and Core Topics (BIOL 199 and BIOL 199L); and those that fulfill the mathematics or natural science requirement of the core curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences which is Biological Concepts (BIOL 100).  BIOL170 and 170L are offered for Nursing and pre-allied health science students and may not be used as Biology electives. Other special interest classes for both majors and non-majors are offered periodically.


BIOL 100 Biological Concepts: 3.00 credits
A one-semester course designed to investigate the process of science by focusing on current biological issues. Different subfields of biology will be explored depending on the instructor. This biology course does not have a lab. Designed for non-science majors. Fall and Spring.
 
BIOL 105 Info Flow in Biol Systems 3.00 credits
This course provides a foundation in the principles of biology by examining the fundamental role of information in generating the properties of life. The course explores the molecular basis of biological information (codes, signals, structures) and its role in growth, development, communication, regulation, reproduction and evolution of living things. Fall and Spring.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 105L
BIOL 105L Info Flow in Biol Systems Lab 1.00 credit
Designed to provide students with an authentic scientific discovery experience, this lab involves the isolation, identification, and characterization of novel bacteriophages from local soil samples. Students learn how to approach scientific questions, make observations, record, analyze and report data. Taken concurrently with BIOL 105.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 105 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 106 Energy Flow in Biol Systems 3.00 credits
This course focuses on the biological processes of energy acquisition, how energy is used in biological systems, and how energy is transferred between organisms and through ecosystems. Human impacts to energy transfer will be covered and topics will integrate energy concepts from cells to organisms to ecosystems. There is no lab associated with this course. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 105 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 105L Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 123 Human Ecology 3.00 credits
A study of the principles of ecology (including population dynamics, diversity, and energy flow) and the impact humans have on the environment. Lab is required. Designed for non-science majors. Fall and Spring.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 123L
BIOL 123L Human Ecology Laboratory 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 123.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 123
BIOL 140 Field Botany 3.00 credits
Course includes systematics of flowering plants, plant communities of the Inland Northwest, sight identification of major plant families and selected topics in plant ecology. A plant collection is required. Two four-hour lectures/lab meetings per week and three, ten-hour field trips on Saturdays. Designed for non-science majors. Alternating Summers.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 140L
BIOL 140L Field Botany Lab 1.00 credit
See course description for BIOL 140. Taken concurrently with BIOL 140.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 140
BIOL 159 Field Studies in Biodiversity 4.00 credits
This course uses a field experience as a backdrop to learn about evolutionary, ecological and biogeographical processes that determine the ranges and biodiversity of organisms. The course begins with class work on the Gonzaga campus and is followed by 2-3 weeks in the field, where two faculty members and local experts will mentor students. Field locations vary by semester and may include the Galapagos Islands, Belize, Africa, Costa Rica, or domestic locations. This course is designed for non-science majors, but the class meets together with the students enrolled in BIOL 359 for biology majors. Alternating Summers.
 
BIOL 170 Introduction to Microbiology 3.00 credits
An introduction to microbiology for students in the nursing program or other allied health professions who will not be majoring in Biology. The course includes basic cellular chemistry and genetics, as well as a survey of topics of clinical importance. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 105 Minimum Grade: C- or TRAN GBIO Minimum Grade: T) and (CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: C- or TRAN GCHM Minimum Grade: T)
Concurrent: BIOL 170L
BIOL 170L Intro to Microbiology Lab 1.00 credit
An introduction to methods of microbial analysis including the culture, safe handling, and genetic analysis of microbes. Taken concurrently with BIOL 170.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 170
BIOL 199 Core Topics: 3.00 credits
Designed for non-science majors; this course fulfills the core laboratory science requirement. Lectures and laboratory sessions emphasize science as an inquiry based process. Selected topics will be offered each semester. Lab is required when offered. Fall and Spring.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 199L
BIOL 199L Core Topics Lab: 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 199.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 199
BIOL 205 Physiology & Biodiversity 3.00 credits
This course focuses on understanding the diversity of life on earth and the physiological mechanisms that allow organisms to live in a wide array of environments. We will use a framework of physiology to compare and contrast different clades of organisms, with a focus on eukaryotes. Fall.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent: BIOL 205L
BIOL 205L Physiology & Biodiversity Lab 1.00 credit
Students are introduced to the diversity of organisms and physiological processes that allow organisms to live in a wide array of environments. Taken concurrently with BIOL 205.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 205
BIOL 206 Ecology 3.00 credits
This course examines the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that determine the distribution and abundance of species. We will explore biogeography, the principle of allocation, species interactions, feedbacks between diversity and community and ecosystem structure, and human effects on other species. Spring.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent: BIOL 206L
BIOL 206L Ecology Lab 1.00 credit
Field and laboratory experiments and computer simulations are used to investigate ecological mechanisms that determine the distribution and abundance of species. Taken concurrently with BIOL 206.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 206
BIOL 207 Genetics 3.00 credits
This course promotes an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that shape the flow of biological information at three different levels: within individuals, in the expression of genotypic information as a physical phenotype; across generations, in the transmission of traits and other information during reproduction; and among populations over longer time frames, as a result of evolutionary forces. The course will use case studies of specific biological phenomena as contexts for exploring the topics. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent: BIOL 207L
BIOL 207L Genetics Lab 1.00 credit
This course provides students with hands-on experimental investigations of molecular mechanisms in genetics. Taken concurrently with BIOl 207.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 207
BIOL 290 Directed Readings 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
 
BIOL 295 Science Outreach .00 credits
The Biology and Chemistry Biochemistry departments run a variety of outreach programs that include class visits, field trip tours, special summer programs and more. All of our programs strive to engage participants with opportunities for hands-on scientific discovery and inspiration.
 
BIOL 301L Cell Techniques Lab 2.00 credits
This course is designed to be an intensive introduction to methods of analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure, composition, and behavior. Microscopy (compound and fluorescence), protein studies, enzyme kinetics, bacterial growth, cell signaling, and development are just some of the areas of research students will be exposed to. This course will also be scientific writing and reading intensive, developing student expertise in these critical areas in the field of biological research. (Spring, and possibly Summer based on available space and demand)
 
BIOL 303 Population Ecology 3.00 credits
An in-depth look at the interactions that control the distribution and abundance of organisms at the population level. Topics such as life-history strategies, population dynamics, competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism will be explored through the research literature, field observations, and computer simulations. Fall alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-) or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 303L Population Ecology Laboratory 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 303.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 303
BIOL 304 Practice in Laboratory Teachng 1.00 credit
Students gain teaching experience by assisting laboratory instructors as a teaching assistant (TA) in a laboratory course. Duties may include lab set-up, in-class mentoring, grading, and quiz preparation. May be repeated. A maximum of two credits may be applied to Biology electives. Usually limited to students who have earned an A or B in the lecture portion of the course for which the student is a candidate to TA the lab. By permission.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 305 Biological Data Analysis 4.00 credits
An applied study of statistical methods used to investigate biological questions. Emphasis will be on applications using software to investigate biological data sets generated by student and instructor research. The course will survey descriptive statistics, sampling, experimental design, estimation, hypothesis testing, and model building (e.g. analysis of variance, regression, multivariate). This course does not fulfill the University Core Math requirement.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or (BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 313 Animal Behavior 3.00 credits
This course explores how behavioral processes affect ecological patterns. The behavioral adaptations of animals to their environment including the evolution of behavior, foraging, competition for resources, reproductive ecology, mating systems, parental care, and cooperative behavior. Fall or Spring.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 101 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent: BIOL 313L
BIOL 313L Animal Behavior Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 313.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 313
BIOL 323 Conservation Biology 3.00 credits
This course covers the biological concepts important for the conservation of natural populations, communities, and ecosystems. Both theoretical and empirical studies will be applied to such topics as: the genetics and ecology of small populations, consequences of habitat fragmentation, the impact of introduced species, and the ecological value of biological diversity. Spring, alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent: BIOL 323L
BIOL 323L Conservation Biology Lab 1.00 credit
This lab includes field trips. Taken concurrently with BIOL 323.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 323
BIOL 330 Invertebrate Biology 4.00 credits
An examination of the major invertebrate phyla, including an overview of the structural and functional characteristics of each group. The evolutionary relationships between various invertebrate groups will also be examined. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction of marine species with their environment. Taught in a combined lecture/lab format. Offered on sufficient demand.
 
BIOL 331 Parasitology 3.00 credits
Explores the medical, physiological, ecological, and historical effect of parasites. The course concentrates on human parasites and ranges from viruses and bacteria through helminthes and arthropods. Fall.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 331L Parasitology Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 331
 
Concurrent: BIOL 331
BIOL 333 Community Ecology 3.00 credits
This course provides an introduction to the science of community ecology. The major processes that have created and are operating within communities will be explored, including species diversity, competition, predation, herbivory, island biogeography, and succession. Students will explore the theories and experimental evidence of these processes and conduct ecology projects. Fall alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 334 Advanced Evolutionary Biology 3.00 credits
A study of the mechanisms responsible for the diversity of life on earth. Topics covered include speciation, adaptation, systematics, extinction, natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and gene flow. Examples are chosen from all types of organisms.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 335 Advanced Genetics: 3.00 credits
An advanced study of genetics within the context of a selected topic in biology. Past topics have included an examination of human race and racism and the study of genomes. Spring. Alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 337 Developmental Biology 3.00 credits
A study of the principles and mechanisms that underlie the development of plants and animals, using approaches that integrate cell biology, genetics, molecular biology, and evolution. Spring alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent: BIOL 337L
BIOL 337L Developmental Biology Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 337.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 337
BIOL 338 Histology 3.00 credits
A study of the microscopic structure of animal (mostly mammalian) tissues and organs. Topics include: histology, cytology, and microscopic anatomy as exemplified in animal tissue. Material will emphasize the relationship between structure and function in tissues and organs. Fall.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 101 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent: BIOL 338L
BIOL 338L Histology Lab 1.00 credit
Labs will combine the study of tissue structure using a collection of prepared slides, and the processing and sectioning of tissue samples. Lab assignments will include the production of personal digital atlases. Taken concurrently with BIOL 338.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 338
BIOL 340 Field Botany 3.00 credits
This class meets with and covers the same topics as BIOL 140 but is designed for biology majors. In addition to the topics and requirements listed for BIOL 140, biology majors are required to complete a field project in the area of plant systematics or plant ecology. Summer.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 101 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent: BIOL 340L
BIOL 340L Field Botany Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 340.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 340
BIOL 341 Human Physiology 3.00 credits
Examines the function of human physiological systems including: metabolic, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, muscular, and immunological. Systems are examined through case studies focused on human disease and human performance. Lab offered concurrently. Spring, alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 101 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent: BIOL 341L
BIOL 341L Human Physiology Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 341. Topics from the lecture will be examined. May require weekend fieldtrips.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 341
BIOL 343 Plant Community Ecology 3.00 credits
This class meets with and covers the same topics as BIOL 333 (Community Ecology), but is designed for biology majors who need a plant ecology-focused course. Students will explore the theories and experimental evidence of community ecology and conduct ecology projects with a specific focus on plant processes. Fall alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 344 GIS & Ecological Techniques 3.00 credits
This course will introduce students to geographic information systems (GIS) and focus on how GIS can be used to address research and management questions in ecology. Student will use existing GIS databases from area resource agencies and learn how to create new GIS databases from field exercises. Field techniques will include vegetation sampling, small mammal trapping, amphibian/reptile monitoring, distance sampling, wildlife habitat assessment, and mapping exercises using compass and global position systems (GPS).
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent: BIOL 344L
BIOL 344L GIS & Ecological TechniquesLab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 344.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 344
BIOL 351 Advanced Cell Biology 3.00 credits
An advanced study of cell structure and function with an emphasis on selected topics in cell biology. Topics vary with instructor, but may include cell signaling, cell cycle, plant cells, and the cell biology of cancer. Spring.
 
Prerequisite: CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: D and (BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 351L Advanced Cell Biology Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 351.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 351
BIOL 357 Princ of Wildlife Management 3.00 credits
The ecology, theory, methods, and philosophy of wildlife management emphasizing game, nongame, and endangered species. Students gain an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of various government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Fall, alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent: BIOL 357L
BIOL 357L Wildlife Management Lab 1.00 credit
This lab includes field trips. Taken concurrently with BIOL 357.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 357
BIOL 359 Field Studies in Biodiversity 4.00 credits
This course uses a field experience as a backdrop to learn about evolutionary, ecological and biogeographical processes that determine the ranges and biodiversity of organisms. The course begins with class work on the Gonzaga campus and is followed by 2-3 weeks in the field, where two faculty members and local experts will mentor students. Field locations vary by semester and may include the Galapagos Islands, Belize, Africa, Costa Rica, or domestic locations. This course is designed for students majoring or minoring in biology, but the class meets together with students enrolled in BIOL 159 for non-science majors. Summer, alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 360 Plant Biology 3.00 credits
This course acquaints students with the evolution, structure, development and functions of plant cells, tissues and organs. Fall alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent: BIOL 360L
BIOL 360L Plant Biology Lab 1.00 credit
This lab includes field trips. Taken concurrently with BIOL 360.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 360
BIOL 367 Entomology 3.00 credits
This course introduces students to the scientific study of insects. Topics will include insect identification, diversity, behavior, anatomy, ecology, and applied entomology. Fall alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 367L Entomology Lab 1.00 credit
This lab includes field trips. Taken concurrently with BIOL 367.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 367
BIOL 370 Microbiology 3.00 credits
A study of the fundamental factors involved in microbiology including basic microbial morphology, taxonomy, biochemistry, genetics, and culture techniques. Fall.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent: BIOL 370L
BIOL 370L Microbiology Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 370.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 370
BIOL 371 Vertebrate Biology & Anatomy 3.00 credits
Vertebrate diversity, structure and function from an evolutionary perspective. Topics covered will include development, physiology, ecology, behavior and conservation. Fall.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent: BIOL 371L
BIOL 371L Vertebrate Biol & Anatomy Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 371.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 371
BIOL 374 Immunology 3.00 credits
An introduction to the cellular and molecular basis of the immune response. Topics will include structures and interactions of effect on molecules in the immune system, generation of diversity in immune specificity, cellular immunology, and the basis of immunity and autoimmune diseases. Soing. Lab required when offered.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 374L Immunology Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 374.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 374
BIOL 375 Virology 3.00 credits
Viral evolution, replication, virus-host interactions, epidemiology, and lateral gene transfer are covered. Spring alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 390 Directed Reading 1.00 - 4.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
 
BIOL 395 Research Assistantship .00 credits
Undergraduate research assistantships are opportunities for student to earn a stipend while performing independent research in the laboratory of a Biology or Chemistry & Biochemistry faculty member. By permission only.
 
BIOL 399 Advanced Topic: 2.00 credits
An introduction to primary research literature on specific biological topics. Students will write a paper that has as its foundation primary literature. Students will utilize their oral communication skills to explain the background of a given biology topic and lead discussions of the primary literature. Topics will vary. Course should be taken Junior year. Fall and Spring. Pre-requisites vary depending on topic.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 405L Advanced Phage Research Lab 1.00 credit
This course provides students with the opportunity to pursue research on bacterial viruses, or bacteriophages. Students will work independently or in small teams to address questions chosen collaboratively by the students and the instructor. The course is aimed at students who are interested in molecular biology or bioinformatics research and those seeking additional experience in a research setting. Interested students should contact the instructor prior to registration to plan a research proposal. This course may be taken up to four times with permission. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 105L Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207L Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 420 Physiological Ecology 3.00 credits
This course will examine the interactions between organismal function and the physical environment. Topics include: physiological and evolutionary adaptations to extreme environments (high altitudes, deep oceans, and deserts), physiological determinants of patterns of diversity, limits to performance and environmental tolerance, and physiological responses to climate change. Fall alternate years.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D) or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 101 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 106 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 440 Biochemistry I 3.00 credits
Lectures on the structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids) with an emphasis on proteins and enzymology. The central metabolic pathways of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the citric acid cycle are discussed from a mechanistic, energetic, and regulatory viewpoint. Fall.
 
Prerequisite: CHEM 331 Minimum Grade: D and (CHEM 310 Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 240 Minimum Grade: D) and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D
BIOL 441 Advanced Physiology 3.00 credits
Physiological mechanisms, processes and responses of animals. Physical, chemical and biochemical principles common to physiological systems, such as respiration, excretion, and metabolism, will be covered. Goals of the course are to reveal the mechanisms, adaptive significance, and evolution of physiological systems using a comparative approach. Spring.
 
Prerequisite: (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C-) and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
Concurrent: BIOL 441L
BIOL 441L Advanced Physiology Lab 1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with BIOL 441.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 441
BIOL 443L Biochemistry Laboratory I 2.00 credits
An investigation of the techniques used to examine biomolecules and biochemical systems. Students perform integrated laboratory experiments in biochemistry. Spring.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 440 Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D
BIOL 445 Biochemistry II 3.00 credits
Continuation of BIOL 440 (CHEM 440), including an examination of the primary processes of cellular energy production, oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis. The major metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides are covered. Spring.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 440 Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D
BIOL 450 Biophysical Chemistry 3.00 credits
An introduction to quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, kinetics and physical methods as they relate to the study of biological macromolecules. Spring.
 
Prerequisite: MATH 157 Minimum Grade: D and (CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 440 Minimum Grade: D)
BIOL 451 Comparative Endocrinology 3.00 credits
A comparative study of the structure and function of hormones across a wide variety of taxa (emphasizing vertebrates), including secretion and regulation of hormones, mechanisms of action, and integration of hormones into biological processes. Offered on sufficient demand.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C-
BIOL 456 Molecular Biology 3.00 credits
This course explores experimental strategies and techniques for discovering how genes function at the molecular level. The course integrates genetics and biochemistry focusing especially on the relationship between DNA, RNA and protein. Fall.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or (BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-)
Concurrent: BIOL 456L
BIOL 456L Molecular Biology Lab 2.00 credits
Labs focus on the construction, manipulation, and analysis of recombinant DNA molecules. Taken concurrently with BIOL 456.
 
Concurrent: BIOL 456
BIOL 471 Wildlife Management 4.00 credits
Introduces students to the questions, principles and tools used by resource managers in the Kenyan Savanna ecosystem. Students will study habitat assessment, plant and animal identification, plant and animal associations and distributions, and other approaches to evaluating savanna ecosystems. SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES PROGRAM ONLY. See http://www.fieldstudies.org/ for current schedule.
 
BIOL 472 Wildlife Ecology 4.00 credits
Presents students with the information and conceptual background necessary to understand the underlying ecological principles of the East African Savanna ecosystem. Focus on the fundamental processes and relationships between the biotic and abiotic environment. SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES PROGRAM ONLY. See http://www.fieldstudies.org/ for current schedule.
 
BIOL 473 Tropical Marine Ecology 4.00 credits
Discusses the interactions that determine the distribution and abundance patterns of tropical marine organisms, with emphasis on the ecology of near-shore areas. Basic principles of ecology are integrated with physical, chemical and geological oceanography. SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES PROGRAM ONLY. See http://www.fieldstudies.org/ for current schedule.
 
BIOL 474 Rainforest Ecology 4.00 credits
Introduces the structure and function of tropical rainforests including the floral and faunal components. Ecological processes that maintain biodiversity and the evolutionary processes that generate it will be presented. SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES PROGRAM ONLY. See http://www.fieldstudies.org/ for current schedule.
 
BIOL 475 Principles of Forest Mgmt 4.00 credits
Presents the ecological and analytical tools used in the management of terrestrial, living resources. Uses examples from the tropics to stress the theories and skills that provide the foundation for land management worldwide. SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES PROGRAM ONLY. See http://www.fieldstudies.org/ for current schedule.
 
BIOL 476 Princ of Resource Management 4.00 credits
Introduces practical tools used in addressing complex environmental problems including coastal zone planning, guidelines for ecologically sustainable development, environmental impact assessment, fisheries management techniques, and protected-area planning and management. SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES PROGRAM ONLY. See http://www.fieldstudies.org/ for current schedule.
 
BIOL 477 Coastal Ecology 4.00 credits
Examines the ecological processes at the interface between land and sea in order to provide an understanding of how human perturbations can impact both marine and terrestrial systems. The watershed concept will be used to explore nutrient flow, energy cycling, erosion, coastal circulation productivity, and biotic interactions. SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES PROGRAM ONLY. See http://www.fieldstudies.org/ for current schedule.
 
BIOL 484 Research Seminar 1.00 credit
This class is designed to expose students to various areas of biology research and to the different communication forms of that research. Graduate school is a fundamental part of the biology research pathway and therefore this course will help students to become familiar with the graduate school process. The format of the class will include seminars and class meetings. Fall and Spring.
 
BIOL 490 Directed Reading 1.00 - 4.00 credits
Reading material will be selected by the student after consultation with a faculty member in the department. Course may be repeated to total not more than six credits. A maximum of six credits of any combination of BIOL 490, BIOL 496, and BIOL 498 can be applied to Biology electives. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 496 Biological Resch Techniques 1.00 - 3.00 credits
An introduction to some of the experimental techniques used in biological research. Course content will vary by instructor. A maximum of six credits of any combination of BIOL 490, BIOL 496, and BIOL 498 can be applied to Biology electives. On sufficient demand.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 498 Undergraduate Research .00 - 6.00 credits
This course provides the motivated student with the opportunity to conduct an independent research project under the direction of a Biology Department faculty member. A maximum of six credits of any combination of BIOL 490, BIOL 496, and BIOL 498 can be applied to Biology electives. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or (BIOL 205 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-)
BIOL 499 Senior Colloquium 1.00 credit
Required of all majors. This course meets once per week to review students framework of biological knowledge, discuss biological principles, and develop biological writing skills. Recent primary literature articles on current topics in biology may be examined as a means of review. At the end of the semester, students are required to take the Major Field Test in Biology. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 Minimum Grade: D or (BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) or (BIOL 101 Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- and BIOL 207 Minimum Grade: C-) and BIOL 399 Minimum Grade: C-
   

©2011 Gonzaga University. All Rights Reserved. | Full HTML Version