College Events

All events are open to the public.
All events are free unless otherwise noted.

March

"What Tocqueville Saw in Ireland in 1830: Photos from his Footsteps"

Douglas Kries, Gonzaga University

Thursday, March 2, 2017 
7:30 pm 
Jepson Center- Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University 

This event is Part One of a two-part lecture series on Ireland. The second lecture will be given by Peter Tormey on March 9.

Discovery Concert: Choral Music of Argentina

Gonzaga University Chamber Chorus

with Argentinian guest conductor Emiliano Linares

Monday, March 6, 2017 
4:30 pm 
Jundt Art Museum- Chancellor's Room

Emiliano Linares comes to Gonzaga University from Argentina for a residency with Gonzaga University Chamber Chorus. His residency is as a conducting fellow of the International Conductor Exchange Program, through the American Choral Directors Association. He will lead a short exploration of choral music from Argentina in the intimate setting of the Chancellor’s Room of Jundt Art Museum.

Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra

with Young Artists' Concerto & Aria Competition Winners

Monday, March 6, 2017 
7:30 pm 
Martin Woldson Theatre at the Fox
$14 General Public • $10 Students • Free with GU ID

"Twenty-Five Years and Counting: Women’s Studies as a Field and the Queer Daughter’s Voice.”

Mary Jo Bona, SUNY Stony Brook

Wednesday, March 8, 2017 
7:00 pm 
Hemmingson Ballroom—Cardoner
Gonzaga University

Dr. Bona will be the keynote speaker for Gonzaga University's Women's and Gender Studies 25th Anniversary Celebration.

Bona is a former Gonzaga English professor and one of the seven founders of the Women’s and Gender Studies program at Gonzaga University. She is currently Professor of Italian American Studies and Professor and Chair of the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at SUNY Stony Brook.

Dr. Bona’s keynote talk will be followed by a catered reception until 9:00 p.m.

"She's Got a Ticket to Ride: Hester's Needle, Migrating Women, and Mending Fragmentation in the New World"

Mary Jo Bona, SUNY Stony Brook

Thursday, March 9, 2017 
4:45 pm
Jepson Center- Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University

Dr. Bona, a former Gonzaga English professor, will give this year’s Visiting Scholar’s Lecture, based on Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter.

From the Department of English.

"Irish-American Identity: Perspectives of an Immigrant's Son"

Peter Tormey, Gonzaga University

Thursday, March 9, 2017 
7:30 pm
Jepson Center- Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University

Peter Tormey is Associate Director of Public Relations and Managing Editor of Gonzaga University News Service.

Tormey taught in Gonzaga's School of Professional Studies before he stopped two years ago to write his book, The Thursday Speeches: Lessons in Life, Leadership, and Football from Coach Don James.

"Screening Strategic Ambiguity: Reading Black Female Resistance to the Postracial Lie"

Ralina Joseph, University of Washington

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 
7:00 pm
Jepson Center- Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University

The Department of Communication Studies welcomes Dr. Ralina Joseph is an Associate Professor of Communication in the Department of American Ethnic Studies and Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at University of Washington. She is also the founding Director of UW’s Center for Communication, Difference and Equity.

Dr. Joseph will be talking about her forthcoming book Screening Strategic Ambiguity: Reading Black Female Resistance to the Postracial Lie (NYU Press), which looks at how, in the Michelle Obama era, a very visible group of African American women celebrities, cultural producers, and audiences use and refute the tools of post-racial discourse—the media-propagated notion that race and race-based discrimination are over, and that race and racism no longer affect the everyday lives of both Whites and people of color—in order to resist the very tenets of post-racial discourse.

"Going for Orbit"

Dr. Rhea Seddon, NASA astronaut and U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame inductee

Monday, March 27, 2017 
7:00 pm
Hemmingson Ballroom
Gonzaga University

How did a small-town girl become a surgeon and one of the first six women astronauts for NASA in 1978?

Discover how Dr. Rhea Seddon navigated a man’s world to accomplish her dream of conducting medical experiments in space, and what it took to become a healthcare leader at the Vanderbilt Medical Group for over a decade. And, this ATHENA Award winner didn’t stop there – she is now a popular national speaker, and recently published her memoir Go For Orbit.  Dr. Seddon’s tale of opportunities and mentors weaves a remarkable career journey that will inspire you to reach for the stars.

Co-sponsored by the Women’s and Gender Studies Department; the Ed and Bunny Renouard Distinguished Lecture Series in the School of Engineering & Applied Science; the Academic Vice President; the Smith Family Chair in Medicine at the University of Washington Medical School; the College of Arts & Sciences; the Departments of Chemistry, Biology, and Mathematics; the Faculty Speaker Series; the Comprehensive Leadership Program; and the Gonzaga Study Body Association Speakers Fund.

Dean's Research and Creative Activity Forum:

"Preserving the Legacies of Cesar Chavez and La Causa: Public History, Civic Engagement, and the Latino Catholic Fight for Social Justice in the 20th Century"

Dr. Raymond Rast, Gonzaga University

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 
4:30 pm
Jepson Center- Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University

In July 2016, Dr. Ray Rast (Lecturer, History) finished a multi-year process of working with the National Park Service to nominate Our Lady of Guadalupe Mission Chapel as a National Historic Landmark. Located in San Jose, California, the former chapel building is closely associated with Cesar Chavez’s Catholic faith and social justice activism. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell approved Dr. Rast’s nomination in January 2017.

The College will celebrate this designation and honor the upcoming Cesar Chavez Day with a presentation by Dr. Rast. Dr. Rast will offer a brief overview of Chavez’s life and work. He also will speak about his ongoing work with the National Park Service’s “Amerlcan Latino Heritage Initiative” and the broader importance of historic preservation, public history, and the public humanities. The lecture will be followed by a reception for attendees.

The College of Arts & Sciences' Dean's Research and Creative Activity Forum is a series featuring the scholarly and creative work of faculty of the College.

O'Leary Lecture:

"Adrenaline: How Pathways of Discovery Converge"

Dr. Stephen Sprang, biology professor and director of the Center for Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics at the University of Montana, Missoula

Thursday, March 30, 2017 
7:30 pm
Cataldo Hall, Globe Room
Gonzaga University

Stephen Sprang is a structural biologist, whose laboratory uses X-ray crystallography, spectroscopy, biochemistry and molecular biology to understand the molecular basis of the processes by which cells communicate with each other. For the past two decades, his laboratory has focused on G protein-mediated signaling, through which myriad biological pathways ranging from vision to the immune system are controlled. The story of adrenaline signaling, to which his laboratory has contributed, exemplifies the many pathways that converge to produce a critical biological response.

The annual lecture series is presented by the GU science departments in honor of the late Father Timothy O’Leary, S.J., devoted priest and chemistry professor at Gonzaga from 1933 until his death in 1975.  Friends and former students of Fr. O’Leary established an endowment to bring a noted scientist to campus each year in his honor.

Department of Theatre & Dance:

Stupid F#cking Bird

by Aaron Posner

March 30, 31 & April 1, 2017 
7:30 pm
Magnuson Theatre
Gonzaga University

How does art, love and revolution fuel your own pursuit of happiness?

Directed by student Annika Perez-Krikorian, Stupid F#cking Bird tells the story of an aspiring young director's challenge of the art created by his parents' generation. Meanwhile, a nubile young actress wrestles with an aging Hollywood star for the affections of a famous novelist.  Everyone discovers just how disappointing love, art and growing up can be. In this irreverent, contemporary and very funny remix of Checkov's The Seagull, we see the timeless battle between young and old, past and present, in search of the true meaning of it all.

Stupid F#cking Bird features an all-student cast and student designers.

$5 All Seats

April

Department of Theatre & Dance:

Student Choreography Concert

Thursday, April 6, 2017 
7:30 pm
Magnuson Theatre
Gonzaga University

Advised by faculty Suzanne Ostersmith, Choreography students present their work with student dancers.

Faculty Cello Recital

Kevin Hekmatpanah, Gonzaga University

Saturday, April 8, 2017 
7:30 pm
University Chapel, College Hall
Gonzaga University

Kevin Hekmatpanah, professor of music and director of the string program and the Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra, presents a free concert featuring music from three Russian composers: Shostakovich, Prokofiev and Stravinsky.  Kevin is performing on cello with Darin Manica on piano.

Hekmatpanah has presented hundreds of solo and chamber performances throughout the country and made over one hundred and twenty solo concerto appearances with various ensembles around the world. His teachers have included such nationally renowned pedagogues as Stephen Kates, Fritz Magg, and Gabor Rejto, and he has received coachings from such internationally celebrated artists as Yo-Yo Ma, Lynn Harrell, and Janos Starker.

Darin Manica holds piano performance degrees from the University of Missouri at Kansas City and the University of Colorado at Boulder and taught on the faculty at Colorado State University.  Darin has been the featured guest artist with the Middle Tennessee Symphony, Timberline Symphony, Gonzaga University Orchestra and the Loveland Chamber Orchestra playing the works of Prokofiev, Bach, Saint-Saëns, Finzi and Liszt.

Gonzaga University Visiting Writers Series:

Brian Bedard, Gonzaga University

and winners of the Gurian Writers Award

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 
7:30 pm 
Jepson Center- Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University 

Brian Bedard is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of South Dakota and currently teaches in Gonzaga University's Department of English. He has also taught at Black Hills State University, Northeast Missouri State University, and the University of Utah. From 1996 to 2011 he served as editor of the literary journal, The South Dakota Review. His first collection of stories, Hour of the Beast and Other Stories, was published by Chariton Review Press. His second collection, Grieving on the Run, won the Serena McDonald Kennedy Award for Fiction and was published by Snake Nation Press. His stories have appeared in a variety of literary magazines nationwide, including Quarterly West, Cimarron Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, and North American Review.

As a GU Visiting Writer, Bedard will read alongside winners of the annual Michael Gurian Writing Awards contest for Gonzaga students.

A Persian Oikoumenē?

Mapping the World in Herotodus' Histories

Dr. Jessica Romney, University of Calgary

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 
12:00 pm 
College Hall 101
Gonzaga University 

Abstract: In book 4 of the Histories, Herodotus pauses his discussion of the areas west and north of the Euxine Sea to weigh in on the Ionian practice of map-making. Declaring that the symmetrical, bipartite circular worlds on the model of Hecataeus’ periodos gēs, or ‘itinerary of the earth,’ to be ludicrous, Herodotus then promises “to make clear the extent of each continent and what sort each is in its depiction” (4.36.2). Yet what we get in the end is not so much a map of the world, or even its settled portions, but rather one of the Persian Empire. In this talk, I compare Herodotus’ mode of depicting the world with his general practice for representing geographical space elsewhere in the Histories: rather than arranging the global space in line with Greek knowledge of the world as is his norm, in book 4 Herodotus takes a Persian perspective, centering the map on the dominant player of the Histories, namely the Persian Empire. The result is a map whose geography reflects the political realities of the Eastern Mediterranean and Mesopotamia, where power networks extended from a Persian center once Cyrus conquered Lydia and Babylon and which continued to do so even after the Persian Wars. I then end with a look at what this map means for the larger narrative of the Histories and Greek understandings of their place in the world based on their relationship with the Persian Empire.

Gonzaga Wind Symphony

conducted by Robert Spittal, Gonzaga University

Monday, April 24, 2017 
7:30 pm 
Martin Woldson Theatre at the Fox

A free shuttle bus departs for the Fox from St. Aloysius Catholic Church at 6:40pm and 7:05pm with return service at 9pm

$10 General Public • $10 Students • Free with GU ID

Department of Theatre & Dance:

Annual Spring Dance Concert

April 27, 28 & 29, 2017 
7:30 pm
April 29, 2017 
2:00 pm
Magnuson Theatre
Gonzaga University

Directed by faculty Suzanne Ostersmith, the Annual Spring Dance Concert showcases performances developed out of academic dance classes, student choreography and our participation in the American College Dance Association conference.  This year we put our spotlight on ballet, jazz, modern and urban dance forms.

The Annual Spring Dance Concert features choreography from faculty Suzanne Ostersmith, Pam Erickson, Sarah Fealk and Karla Parbon along with costume design by faculty Leslie Stamoolis.  Lighting design is by faculty Courtney Smith and the lighting design students.

$5 All Seats

Tickets Available Here

"Luminosity: Light in Darkness”
Spring Masterworks Concert

from Gonzaga University Concert Choir and Incendo Music Ensemble

Sunday, April 30, 2017 
3:00 pm 
Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist

East meets West in the Concert Choir’s spring performance, joining with professional orchestra, Incendo Music Ensemble to present Mozart’s bold and exhilarating Great Mass.  We welcome solo guest to play Tanpura, a traditional Indian instrument, and microtonal viola in the new work, Luminosity by James Whitbourn.  The traditional Latin Mass text used by Mozart strikingly contrasts Luminosity as Whitbourn used texts by Isaac of Ninevah, Julian of Norwich, St. Teresa of Avila, Augustine of Hippo and Buddhist nun Ryonen. Conducted by Timothy Westerhaus, Gonzaga University.

$12 Adults/Seniors in advance . $15 at door
$7 Faculty/Staff in advance . $10 at door
$7 Non-GU Students in advance . $10 at door
Free for GU Students & Children Under 13

Tickets Available Here

May

Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra

with piano soloist Alon Goldstein

Monday, May 1, 2017 
7:30 pm
Martin Woldson Theatre at the Fox

Join the Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra with special guest Alon Goldstein for a program including works by Tchaikovsky and Mendelssohn.

$14 General Public • $10 Seniors & Students • Free with GU ID

Tickets Available Here

Department of Theatre & Dance:

One Act Festival

Friday, May 5, 2017 
7:30 pm
Magnuson Theatre
Gonzaga University

Advised by faculty Charles M. Pepiton, the Directing II students present their work with student performers. The One Act Festival also features the work of student costume designers under the direction of faculty Leslie Stamoolis.



Department of Theatre & Dance:

Chamber Chorus Concert

with the Spokane Symphony

Saturday, May 6, 2017
8:00 pm
Sunday, May 7, 2017 
3:00 pm
Martin Woldson Theatre at the Fox

The GU Chamber Chorus, directed by Dr. Timothy Westerhaus, performs Verdi's Requiem and Serenade to Music by Ralph Vaughn Williams. Spokane Symphony Orchestra conducted by Eckart Preu.

Tickets $15-54