Living Together in Residence Halls

Living in a Residence Hall

Students from many different backgrounds and cultures come together to build their "community" at Gonzaga University. There are standards of conduct for living in a residence hall. Each student is challenged to take these standards and internalize them for his or her own individual success and the success of the community. Residents will be expected to follow the guidelines for quiet hours and courtesy hours. When the actions of residents interfere with the learning environment, each member of the community is expected to challenge those actions. The Residence Hall Staff will be available to help the community maintain a good academic environment.

The standards include state and local laws regarding the possession and use of alcohol and illegal drugs, including marijuana.

Students who are contacted for violations of these community standards are subject to disciplinary action, including removal from the residence hall and other university sanctions. For more information about behavior expectations, please refer to the community standards section.

Living Together: Roommates

Sharing a room with a total stranger, or even your best friend, is a new experience for many people. Since you may have had your own room at home, sharing a room will require you to make some adjustments. Let's be honest....probably a lot of adjustments!! You and your roommate will need to sit down early on and discuss each other's preferences.

How will you handle visitors?

What are agreeable hours to have friends over?

Are you a morning or a night person?

What type to music do you each prefer?

All of these things, and many more, need to be discussed. The most important aspect of developing a positive relationship with your roommate is effective communication. Make a commitment to talk to each other when issues or situations arise. RAs may facilitate the roommate agreement process at the first floor meeting. We suggest you make an initial attempt to start with the above questions, perhaps over your first meal together in the dining hall. Then, we suggest you commit to have a monthly one/one meeting, perhaps over a meal or even a pizza delivered to your room to review how it's going. This would be a regular time that the two of you can communicate openly about concerns, issues, etc. And please know your Resident Assistant can be a helpful resource along the way if you want to bounce off concerns first to make sure you are not over reacting to something. Ask our R.A.s to role play it out with you if you want. But we truly think most of you will enjoy getting to know your new roommate. Many of you may become lifelong friends, even if that seems furthest from reality at your initial meeting!