Nursing

Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programs: Joan Owens
Professors: 
S. Boysen, N. Crogan, M. McFarland (Emeritus) 
Associate Professors: 
L. MurphyJ. RamirezJ. Tiedt
Assistant Professors: 
J. IsaacsonC. Kottwitz, K. Manion, D. OgorekJ. OwensB. Senger
Senior Lecturers: 
N. BeckhamD. Smith
Lecturers: 
A. Argyle, C. ChaconM. DeNysschen, J. Derzay, S. Edwards, J. Garrity, D. Jacobson, M. Nash, D. PeckK. Slater

Introduction

Grounded in Jesuit and Nursing values, the pre-licensure BSN program offered by the Department of Nursing prepares students to be able to practice as registered nurses in a variety of settings. Students learn to promote health, to care for patients with acute and chronic illnesses, and to support patients and their families at the end of life. The BSN program builds on the curricular themes of servant leadership, social justice, community, and reflective practice. The concept of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) serves as the organizing framework for the curriculum. One application of this concept is that students initially care for individuals with more predictable healthcare needs. As they progress in the program, they learn to care for individuals, families, and populations with increasingly more complex healthcare needs in highly complex organizational settings.

Program Overview

Students are admitted to the pre-licensure BSN program as freshmen. At the time they submit their applications to Gonzaga University, nursing applicants must indicate "Nursing" as their first academic interest on the Common Application. Nursing applicants are also required to complete "Section V" of the Common Application Gonzaga Student Supplement. Those not admitted into nursing as freshmen may not become a nursing major at Gonzaga. As freshman nursing majors, students begin the process of completing the GU core requirements and the nursing pre-requisite courses.

Due to constraints on availability of clinical placements, it may take nine semesters to complete the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program. The Nursing faculty tries to accommodate student requests to complete the program in eight semesters, but the eight semester time frame is not guaranteed. Students apply for their preferred time frame (eight or nine semester) placement during the second semester of their freshman year and are notified of their placement by the end of that same academic year. If demand for completion in eight semesters exceeds available clinical placements and/or limits on class sizes, students will be placed based on their ranked grade point average in the nursing pre-requisite courses and progression in the program. Students who are major-ready by the end of their sophomore year but are placed in the nine-semester time frame for the program may take a leave of absence in the fall semester of their junior year. The nine-semester time frame is supported by financial aid in the same way as the eight-semester option, and it provides students with opportunities to pursue a minor or to participate in a study abroad program.

Once students begin their upper division nursing courses, they also complete a series of practicum courses that introduce them to professional nursing practice in a variety of healthcare settings. The program also prepares students to take the National Council Licensing Examination (NCLEX) after graduation, which is a requirement for licensure as a registered nurse.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the pre-licensure BSN program is competitive and selective. Students are admitted to the pre-licensure BSN program as freshmen.  The decision to admit a student to the BSN program as a freshman is based on consideration of the student's overall portfolio including:

  1. Cumulative GPA and grade trends
  2. Four years of math and science courses
  3. SAT/ACT scores
  4. Work or volunteer experience in healthcare
  5. One academic letter of recommendation
  6. Written essay as well as responses to short answer questions on the application

Information regarding admission to Gonzaga's Nursing Program will follow notification of acceptance to the University by approximately one month.

During their first two years at Gonzaga, students need to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better and achieve a minimum grade of "C" (2.0) in all of the nursing prerequisite courses and their respective labs. If a student receives less than the required minimum grade of “C” in any of the nursing prerequisite courses taken at Gonzaga or taken at any other college/university as a substitution, the student may only retake two of these courses one time only. Continuation to the upper division BSN program is contingent upon maintaining a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and successful completion of nursing prerequisite courses.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing: 130 credits

Sample Freshman Year
Fall
BIOL 105 Information Flow in Biological Systems 3 credits
ENGL 101 Writing 3 credits
MATH 121 Statistics 3 credits
NURS 100 Nursing Perspectives 1 credit
PHIL 101 Reasoning 3 credits
SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 credits
Spring
BIOL 105L Information Flow in Biological Systems Lab 1 credit
CHEM 101 General Chemistry
3 credits
CHEM 101L  General Chemistry Lab 1 credit
COMM 100 Communication and Speech 3 credits
PSYC 101 General Psychology 3 credits
First Year Seminar (193) 3 credits
Sophomore Year
Fall
HPHY 241 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 credits
HPHY 241L Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1 credit
NURS 251 Determinants of Health 3 credits
PHIL 201 Philosophy of Human Nature  3 credits
Core Broadening Requirement: (Literature) 3 credits
Core Fine Art 3 credits
Spring
BIOL 170 Microbiology 3 credits
BIOL 170L Microbiology Lab
1 credit
HPHY 242 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 credits
HPHY 242L Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1 credit
HPHY 244 Nutrition and Metabolism 3 credits
NURS 210 Growth and Development  3 credits
Broadening Requirement: (History) 3 credits
RELI Christianity and Catholic Traditions 3 credits
Junior Year
Fall
NURS 311 Professional and Therapeutic Communication 2 credits
NURS 314 Assessing and Promoting Wellness 4 credits
NURS 315 Practicum I: Healthy Individuals, Families, and Communities 5 credits
NURS 316 Pathophysiology and Pharmacology I 4 credits
PHIL 301 Ethics 3 credits
Spring
NURS 351 Care of Individuals and Families 4 credits
NURS 352 Practicum II: Care of Individuals and Families 5 credits
NURS 356 Pathophysiology and Pharmacology II 3 credits
NURS 404 Research and Information Management 3 credits
RELI World or Comparative Religion 3 credits
Senior Year
Fall
NURS 402 Acute and Chronic Alterations in Health Status 4 credits
NURS 403 Practicum III: Acute/Chronic Alterations in Health 6 credits
NURS 418 Complexity in Health Care Organizations 2 credits
PHIL 455 Healthcare Ethics 3 credits
Spring
NURS 465 Professional Nursing within a Complex Adaptive System 3 credits
NURS 466 Community and Populations as Clients 4 credits
NURS 467 Practicum IV: Community and Populations as Clients 2 credits
NURS 468 Practicum V: Member of the Nursing Profession 3 credits
NURS 469 Nursing Leadership and Management 2 credits

RN to MSN Program

(for Registered Nurses)

The RN to MSN program offers the licensed registered nurse with an associate's degree in nursing the opportunity to earn a master's degree in nursing in less time and with fewer credits than would be required if completing separate BSN and MSN degrees. The MSN is the degree awarded, and there is no option for earning a separate BSN degree. In an effort to meet the needs of working registered nurses, the program is offered in a distance delivery format. Students complete five courses (15 credits) that "bridge" them to the master's level courses.

Once the "bridge" courses have been successfully completed, students progress immediately to the master's level courses provided they maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. At the master's level, there is an emphasis on preparation for an advanced role as a nursing leader. Students take the core MSN courses and then complete the Nursing Leadership in Healthcare (NLH) track or concentration. Grounded in Jesuit and Nursing values, the program builds on the curricular themes of servant leadership, social justice, community, and reflective practice. The concept of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) serves as the organizing framework for the curriculum.

Admission Requirements RN to MSN Program

At the time of application to the RN to MSN program, the applicant also applies for admission to Gonzaga University. The applicant must have an associate's degree in nursing from an accredited college and must submit one official transcript from each college or university. The decision to admit an applicant to the RN to MSN program is based on consideration of the individual's overall portfolio including:

  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better (4.0 scale)
  2. Evidence of a current unencumbered RN license
  3. One official transcript from every college or university attended. Only degrees and courses from regionally accredited institutions will be accepted. 
  4. Current curriculum vitae (CV)
  5. Two letters of recommendation from individuals such as employers, colleagues, or professors who can attest to the applicant’s leadership, interpersonal skills, professional practice, critical thinking and judgment, and potential for advanced study.
  6. Typewritten statement that describes the applicant’s:
    a)    Interest in the RN to MSN Program and specific MSN option, e.g., Nursing Leadership in Healthcare
    b)    Professional goals
    c)    Personal and professional strengths
    d)    Professional experiences
  7. Non-native English speakers are required to provide proof of English proficiency.  Gonzaga University accepts the following:
    a)    Score of 6.5 or better on the IELTS, or
    b)    Official TOEFL score of at least 88 ibt or 580 pbt, or
    c)    Completion of an associate's degree in nursing from an institution where English is the primary medium of instruction.
 

Degree Requirements

The RN to MSN program requires the completion of five "bridge" courses (15 credits) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in order to progress to MSN-level course work.

Bridge Courses: 15 Credits

PHIL 280 Person and Conduct (Nursing) 3 credits
NURS 320 Statistics 3 credits
NURS 406 Nursing Research 3 credits
NURS 463 Community Health 3 credits
NURS 464 Community Health Practicum 3 credits

The master’s-level courses are listed in the Graduate Catalog.

Lower Division
NURS 100 Nursing Perspectives
1.00 credit
This course introduces students to the profession of nursing and seeks to develop in the student the necessary skills and characteristics for successful participation in nursing education at Gonzaga University. The background of nursing and nursing theories, the diverse roles and scope of practice governing nurses in health care, appraisal of healthcare information, the use of technology for research, and the responsibility of nurses in addressing contemporary healthcare issues will be explored. Students are introduced to the mission, ethos, and academic honesty policy of the university and the relationship to nursing, thereby increasing self-awareness and clarifying personal beliefs and goals for professional practice.
NURS 210 Growth and Development
3.00 credits
Examines multiple dimensions of individual and family growth and development across the lifespan. Within each developmental stage students examine areas of language, cognition, social-emotional growth and physical development. This course highlights developmental milestones at each stage of the lifespan. Genetic, gender, and cultural influences are considered.
Prerequisite:
PSYC 101 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 251 Determinants of Health
3.00 credits
This course introduces the ecological framework of health and focuses on one's physical and social environments and access to health care as determinants of health, health disparities, and health inequities. Students will gain an understanding of factors that contribute to illness versus wellness, as well as factors that affect health outcomes and recovery from illness. Students will learn basic community assessment skills, including how to use and interpret basic epidemiological measures.
Prerequisite:
SOCI 101 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 121 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C
Upper Division
NURS 311 Prof & Therapeutic Comm
2.00 credits
This course is designed to provide the learner a theoretical foundation for effective communication. Using the lens of complex adaptive systems and servant leadership, selected models of communication, health and illness, health communication, conflict resolution and negotiation are explored for their implications for nursing practice. Diversity issues affecting perception of health/illness and influencing verbal and nonverbal communication are examined. Media and internet influence on health care and the profession of nursing are included. Theory-based strategies to improve communication skills throughout the health care continuum are stressed.
Prerequisite:
NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 210 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 314 Assessing & Promoting Wellness
4.00 credits
Complex adaptive systems, as they relate to body systems, individuals (children, adolescents, adults, and older adults), and families are used as a guiding framework. Theoretical and research-based content in individual and family health and development throughout the life span is emphasized. Students learn foundational skills for the health assessment and care of individuals and family. The student integrates functional health patterns, physical assessment findings, and family concepts to formulate nursing diagnoses and a nursing plan of care. The nursing role in health promotion and health education is emphasized.
Prerequisite:
NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 210 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 315 NURS 316
NURS 315 Pract I:Assess/Promo Wellness
5.00 credits
Students will use knowledge from Nurs 314 to assess and promote wellness for healthy individuals and families in community settings. Students participate in learning activities in the Learning Resource Center, in a variety of community-based settings, and in post clinical conferences. The course celebrates the body, mind, and spirit of the student in nursing and recognizes that learning transforms. In the process of transformation, reflection provides the key to understanding.
Prerequisite:
NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 210 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 314 NURS 316
NURS 316 Pathophy & Pharmacology I
4.00 credits
This is the first of a two course pathophysiology and pharmacology series in the BSN curriculum. The course is designed to improve the learner's understanding of how alterations in normal human anatomic structure and physiology function may impact various organ systems, body homeostasis, and medication management. A student-center case-based active learning model will be utilized to exemplify basic and clinical pharmacology principles for common outpatient disease processes. Nursing pharmacology fundamentals, including principles of drug administration, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse drug effects, drug interactions, and medication errors are introduced. These principles form the foundation for applied pharmacology case studies. Drug class prototypes will be reviewed using an organ system case-based pathophysiologic approach to therapeutics. The case studies illustrate key pathophysiologic and pharmacology concepts thus providing students an opportunity for critical thinking, synthesis, integration, and application of course material to therapeutic decision making, planning, and managing care for individuals.
Prerequisite:
NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 210 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 314 NURS 315
NURS 320 Stats for Health Professions
3.00 credits
This online course provides an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. It includes the statistical procedures used most frequently to analyze quantitative data for health science and nursing research. Emphasis is placed on the conceptual understanding and correct application of statistical tests, as well as the correct interpretation of statistical results. Some mathematical calculation will be necessary. The ultimate goal will be for the learner to understand statistical reasoning and become familiar with the correct use and interpretation of statistics.
NURS 351 Care of Individual & Family
4.00 credits
This course focuses on the development of nursing competence in planning and managing care for individuals and families with alterations in health status. The course stresses the integration of physiological, pathophysiological, pharmacological and developmental concepts as the foundation for professional nursing practice. Theoretical foundations for the provision of care to individuals and families with alterations in health related to fluid and electrolyte balance and to the reproductive, urinary tract/renal, musculoskeletal, and digestive systems, and some of the more common mental health problems are addressed. Use of theory and research based assessment strategies and nursing interventions required to provide care to these individuals/families in health care organizations are emphasized. Critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning are stressed.
Prerequisite:
NURS 314 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 315 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 316 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 352 NURS 356
NURS 352 Pract II: Care Indiv & Family
5.00 credits
Using knowledge from NURS 351, this course focuses on the provision of care for individuals and families with health care needs related to fluid-electrolyte disturbances, the endocrine, reproductive, urinary tract/renal, musculoskeletal, and digestive systems. Emphasis is placed on the development of self-discovery and the meaning of experience as a reflective practitioner. Students participate in learning activities in the Learning Resource Center, in a variety of clinical settings within healthcare organizations, and in post-clinical conferences.
Prerequisite:
NURS 314 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 315 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 316 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 351 NURS 356
NURS 356 Pathophy & Pharmacology II
3.00 credits
This is the second of a two course pathophysiology and pharmacology series in Gonzaga's BSN curriculum. This course builds on the content and concepts learned in the NURS 316 pathophysiology and Pharmacology I course. It is designed to address more complex pathophysiologic processes which are often encountered in hospitalized acute care patients. A student centered case-based active learning method will be utilized to exemplify advanced clinical pharmacology principles for common inpatient disease processes. Drug class prototypes will be reviewed using an organ system case-based pathophysiologic approach to therapeutics. The case studies illustrate key pathophysiologic and pharmacology concepts thus providing students an opportunity for critical thinking, synthesis, integration, and application of course material to therapeutic decision making, planning, and managing care for individuals.
Prerequisite:
NURS 314 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 315 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 316 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 351 NURS 352
NURS 402 Care of Individuals & Families
4.00 credits
Focuses on the continued development of nursing competence in planning and managing care for individuals and families with complex alterations in health status. Stresses integration of physiological, pathophysiological, psychological, and pharmacological concepts as essential to professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on development of focused assessment skills needed to provide care to individuals and families with health care needs related to the cardiovascular, neurological, endocrine, pulmonary, renal, and mental health systems.
Prerequisite:
NURS 351 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 352 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 356 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 403
NURS 403 PractIII:Acute/Chronic Alt Hlt
6.00 credits
This course focuses on providing care for individuals and families with chronic and complex health care needs related to the cardiovascular, neurological, endocrine, pulmonary, renal and mental health systems. Examines internal resources (such as faith or spiritual health) as a source of nourishment when making decisions--especially those involving ethics, urgency, reaction and immediacy. Students participate in learning activities in the Resource & Simulation Center, in a variety of clinical settings within healthcare organizations, and in post-clinical conferences.
Prerequisite:
NURS 351 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 352 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 356 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 402
NURS 404 Research & Info Management
3.00 credits
Provides an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research principles and methodologies, including evaluation of research studies and application to practice. Critical analysis of nursing and health care research is emphasized. Stresses research design, sampling, data collection strategies and ethical considerations in research.
Prerequisite:
MATH 121 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 406 Nursing Research
3.00 credits
This course provides an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research principles and methodologies, including evaluation of research studies and application to practice. Critical analysis of nursing and health care research is emphasized. The course stresses research design, sampling, data collection strategies, and ethical considerations in research.
Prerequisite:
NURS 320 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 417 Design Mng Coord Hlth Care
2.00 credits
This course analyzes the role of the nurse in designing, managing and coordinating health care for individuals, groups, families and communities in a complex adaptive system.
Prerequisite:
NURS 357 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 418 Complexity in HlthCare Org
2.00 credits
This course considers quality, safety and error reduction within complex healthcare organizations in the United States. Healthcare policy, health care transitions, interdisciplinary health care and social-cultural implications are explored. The nursing role in the delivery and maintenance of safe, quality care of the patient and family are emphasized using current competency models.
Prerequisite:
NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
NURS 463 Community Health
3.00 credits
Designed for the licensed registered nurse, this course introduces community-as-partner model as a guide for providing cost-effective, accessible care for families, groups, and populations. Emphasis will be placed on cultural competence, the use of complex adaptive systems to understand the interaction among and between systems within community health practice, epidemiological concepts in the development of effective health policy/programs, and ethical dilemmas inherent in the community-as-partner model of practice.
Concurrent:
NURS 464
NURS 464 Community Health Practicum
3.00 credits
This practicum emphasizes the use of the community-as-partner model to guide community health practice. Students will explore the various dimensions of a healthy community as they actively participate in community health practice that emphasizes assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating cost-effective, accessible care for families, groups, and populations within a complex adaptive system. Students will expand their cultural competence, apply epidemiological concepts in the development of effective health policy/programs, and gain an appreciation of the ethical dilemmas inherent in the community-as-partner model of practice.
Concurrent:
NURS 463
NURS 465 Prof Nurs Prc Complex Adpt Sys
3.00 credits
Considers nursing leadership roles within complex adaptive systems and examines transition to the professional role. Servant leadership principles are connected to nursing leadership.
Prerequisite:
NURS 317 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 357 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 417 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 466 NURS 467
NURS 466 Population Focused Health
3.00 credits
This course will address communities and populations as the clients for nursing interventions. The focus of this course is interventions used to promote and improve population health. A particular emphasis will be interpreting assessment and epidemiological data to identify and prioritize community/population problems and selecting appropriate interventions for an identified population health problem. Learners also will be introduced to selected principles and theories that underlie population-focused interventions. Program planning and evaluation processes and strategies will be considered. Use the criteria of effectiveness, efficiency, equity, security, and liberty to analyze a public health policy.
Prerequisite:
NURS 402 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 403 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 404 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 465 NURS 467
NURS 467 Prac IV:Partner Pop Hlth Pract
2.00 credits
This is a project-based practicum course. Students will work in an assigned community agency to develop a comprehensive plan for addressing an identified population health problem. This course will give students experience in working in evolving population-focused indirect, nursing roles as a project developer/leader and consultant. Practicum experiences will be intentionally designed to give students experience collaborating with professionals from a variety of other helping disciplines. Students will be expected to interact with their assigned agency and its clients on a regular basis.
Prerequisite:
NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 402 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 403 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 404 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 468 Prac V:Member of Nurs Profess
3.00 credits
This capstone course is designed to facilitate the transition from the role of student nurse to that of a professional nurse through an intensive practicum experience in a clinical setting of the student's choice. With the guidance/supervision of an experienced registered nurse preceptor, the student has the opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills gained in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program, demonstrate competencies for entry level nursing practice, and practice nursing leadership within a complex adaptive system (CAS). There is continued emphasis on the significance of reflection as a way of gaining the insights needed to achieve safe, high quality, client-centered practice and effective, ethical leadership. Students examine their own clinical practice and leadership in light of the characteristics of servant leadership. Each student develops an individualized learning contract in collaboration with faculty and the clinical preceptor; the learning contract articulates the student's goals and specific strategies for meeting them. EACH STUDENT PRACTICUM REQUEST WILL BE SUBJECT TO REVIEW BY FACULTY TO DETERMINE FINAL CLINICAL PLACEMENT.
Prerequisite:
NURS 315 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 352 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 403 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 469 Nursing Leadership & Mgmt
2.00 credits
This course focuses on the professional nursing roles of the nurse leader/manager as a change agent, advocate, and role model for others in the health care setting. The course addresses the management skills of scheduling, budgets, delegation, and information technology, and explores health care policy, finance and regulatory environments. In addition, this course addresses the nurse leader’s role in maintaining clinical expertise, effective communication, flexibility, collaboration and conflict resolution.
Prerequisite:
NURS 418 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 490 Clinical Internship
1.00- 3.00 credits
Assists nurses in period of transition from nursing student to registered nurse or from one practice setting to another. Adaptation to role transition fostered through preceptorship with expert clinical RN and through interaction with faculty. Opportunities to both practice and master current knowledge and skills and acquire new ones.
NURS 492 Clinical Update Level I-III
1.00- 5.00 credits
Opportunity to pursue a nursing project or topic of choice with guidance of a faculty member.
NURS 496 Independent Practicum
1.00- 4.00 credits
Opportunity to explore a clinical field or an expanded nursing role with guidance of a faculty member and a clinical preceptor.
NURS 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Requires completion of a form, department permission and cannot be registered for via Zagweb.
NURS 498 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Seminars designed to address special topics in nursing and health care, based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: permission. Fall, Spring, Summer - On sufficient demand.
NURS 499 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Seminars designed to address special topics in nursing and health care, based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: permission. Fall, Spring, Summer - On sufficient demand.
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.