Human Physiology

Chairperson: David Thorp
Professors: D. McCann, D. Thorp
Associate Professor: R. McCulloch
Assistant Professor: P. Crosswhite, A. Gidley
Lecturers: J. McKenzie

The Bachelor of Science degree in Human Physiology provides an introduction to the physical and life sciences, followed by a concentrated study of human structure and function spanning the hierarchy of structure and function from molecules to the entire organism. Acute physiological responses and chronic adaptations to normal activity, exercise, disease and aging are emphasized. Laboratory experiences are used to introduce students to the methods of investigation and evaluation of human structure and function. The degree is unique within the University because it emphasizes the scientific basis and mechanisms of human function, adaptation, aging, health and disease, and performance. Because several courses may double-count for both the University Core Curriculum and the Human Physiology degree, the total credits needed to complete the University Core and Human Physiology degree is 104 credits. This can be further reduced by 6 credits if social justice and global studies requirements are carefully selected. Therefore, Human Physiology majors have a minimum of 24 additional elective credits to complete a minor and/or specific prerequisite courses for graduate or professional school.

Because prerequisites for admission to different graduate programs vary, students are advised to obtain the specific prerequisites from programs and schools of interest as early in their academic career as possible.


B.S. Major in Human Physiology: 69 credits

Science Core: 29 credits
BIOL 105, BIOL 105L Information Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 4 credits
CHEM 101, CHEM 101L General Chemistry and Lab 4 credits
CHEM 230, CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry and Lab 5 credits
MATH 148 or higher 3 credits
PHYS 101 and PHYS 101L General Physics I and Lab 5 credits
PHYS 102 and PHYS 102L General Physics II and Lab 5 credits
One of the following two courses: 3 credits
PSYC 101 General Psychology

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology
 
Lower Division: 17 credits
HPHY 205 Experimental Research Design and Data Analysis 3 credits
HPHY 210 Scientific Writing 3 credits
HPHY 241 and HPHY 241L Human Anatomy and Physiology I and Lab 4 credits
HPHY 242 and HPHY 242L Human Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab 4 credits
HPHY 274 Human Kinetics 3 credits
Upper Division: 23 credits
HPHY 375 and HPHY 375L Biomechanics 4 credits
HPHY 376 and HPHY 376L Exercise Physiology 4 credits
HPHY 441L Guided Experimental Design 
1 credit
HPHY 442L Guided Research 1 credit
HPHY 499 Culminating Experience 1 credit
HPHY 300-400 level electives
  (three credits may be lower division science credits if approved by the department)
12 credits
Lower Division
HPHY 190 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty. Course may be repeated to total not more than 2 credits. By permission from department only. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
HPHY 205 Exp Rsrch Design & Data Anlys
3.00 credits
Relationships among research, research design, measurement, and data analysis provide the context for an introduction to basic concepts of research design and data analysis. Students will learn how to interpret statistics in peer-reviewed research and how to apply statistical methods to analyze data and address research questions in the sciences. Fall.
HPHY 210 Scientific Writing
3.00 credits
An introduction to the fundamentals of writing scientific reports and manuscripts of experimental research, with special emphasis on research in human physiology. Spring.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 205 Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 241 Human Anatomy & Physiology
3.00 credits
An introduction to the fundamentals of anatomical and physiological science, emphasizing basic cell processes as well as homeostasis and control. Basic cell processes include compartmentation of cells and tissues, bioenergetics, membrane dynamics, communication, integration, and homeostasis. Topics include cells, tissues, metabolism, the endocrine system, the nervous system, and muscle. Fall.
Prerequisite:
CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: D and CHEM 101L Minimum Grade: D and BIOL 105 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
HPHY 241L
HPHY 241L Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab
1.00 credit
This laboratory covers physiology and both microscopic and gross anatomy of the skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, and integumentary system. Fall.
Concurrent:
HPHY 241
HPHY 242 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
3.00 credits
This course is a continuation of HPHY 241 emphasizing integration of function. Topics include the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and immune systems as well as fluid, electrolyte, acid base balance. Spring.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 241 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
HPHY 242L
HPHY 242L Human Anatomy & Phys Lab II
1.00 credit
This laboratory covers the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems as well as vision, hearing, and equilibrium. Spring.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 241L Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
HPHY 242
HPHY 244 Nutrition and Metabolism
3.00 credits
An introduction to the study of the role macro and micro nutrients including carbohydrates, fat, protein, vitamins, minerals, and water play in bioenergetics. Additional topics include the anatomy and physiology of digestion, absorption, and the microbiome. Spring.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 241 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 241L Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 274 Human Kinetics
3.00 credits
An introduction to the basic principles of kinesiology with emphasis on osteology, arthrology, and the mechanical interactions between the muscles and joints of the body. Spring.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 205 Minimum Grade: D and PHYS 101 Minimum Grade: D and PHYS 101L Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 241 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 241L Minimum Grade: D
Upper Division
HPHY 304 Practice in Lab Teaching
1.00 credit
Students gain experience in assisting in teaching and directing human physiology laboratory sections. The student must have successful completion of the lab for which the student will be a teaching assistant. By permission from department only. May be repeated for different lab courses (e.g., 241L and 242L) with departmental permission to total not more than 2 credits. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 242 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 242L Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 375 Biomechanics
3.00 credits
An introduction to the physical laws and mechanical aspects governing human motion which covers analysis of internal and external forces acting on the human body and the effects of these forces. Topics include kinematics and kinetics of human motion, function of the musculoskeletal system, and mechanical analysis of movement. Fall.
Concurrent:
HPHY 375L
HPHY 375L Biomechanics Lab
1.00 credit
An introduction to techniques and experimental methods used in the study of human motion.
Concurrent:
HPHY 375
HPHY 376 Exercise Physiology
3.00 credits
A course dealing with the nature and function of neuromuscular activity, circulation, metabolism, respiration and acid-base balance as they relate to exercise and performance. Fall.
Concurrent:
HPHY 376L
HPHY 376L Exercise Physiology Lab
1.00 credit
Laboratory study and techniques dealing with the evaluation of physiological capacities involved in rest, exercise, neuromuscular interactions, metabolism, respiration, and circulation. Fall.
Concurrent:
HPHY 376
HPHY 390 Directed Study
1.00- 2.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty. Course may be repeated to total not more than 2 credits. By permission from department only. Fall, Spring, Summer.
HPHY 401 Assessment of Hlth & Function
3.00 credits
The course covers the purposes, methods, and guidelines related to assessment of health, fitness, and function. Fall or Spring on need.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 376 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 376L Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
HPHY 401L
HPHY 401L Assess of Hlth & Function Lab
1.00 credit
Students will develop skill in administering selected field and laboratory tests for assessing different components of health, fitness, and function. Fall or Spring on need.
Concurrent:
HPHY 401
HPHY 402 Clinical Exercise Physiology
3.00 credits
Assessing and treating individuals with chronic diseases and disabilities, as well as other special populations. Content will include physiology and pathophysiology, exercise prescription, clinical applications, and current research related to a variety of diseases and conditions. Spring.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 376 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 376L Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 422 Cardiovascular Physiology
3.00 credits
This course is designed for upper division students and will expand on the core cardiovascular concepts covered in HPHY 242. The course is designed to help students develop a detailed understanding of the physiology and regulation of the cardiovascular system. The course will cover concepts of myocardial function, peripheral vascular function and the integration and regulation of these two components of the cardiovascular system. Fall or Spring on need.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 376 Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
HPHY 441L Guided Experimental Design
1.00 credit
Laboratory research in the study of physiology or a related sub-discipline such as biomechanics or biomedical engineering. Students work in groups with a faculty advisor (course instructor) in proposing, researching and designing an experiment. Students will author a research proposal and conduct pilot work. Spring.
Prerequisite:
(HPHY 375 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 375L Minimum Grade: D) and (HPHY 376 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 376L Minimum Grade: D)
HPHY 442L Guided Research
1.00 credit
Laboratory research in the study of physiology or a related sub-discipline such as biomechanics or biomedical engineering. Students work in groups with a faculty advisor (course instructor) in conducting, analyzing, and presenting their research. Fall.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 441L Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 477 Environmental Physiolgy
3.00 credits
An in-depth study of specific topics in environmental physiology, including the cellular and systemic responses and adaptations of various organ systems to environmental stress. Spring.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 376 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 376L Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 478 Physiology of Aging
3.00 credits
An introduction to the causes and structural and functional changes that occur with aging. Relevant terminology, methodologies, and theories of aging will be covered. Spring.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 376 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 376L Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 479 Cell & Molecular Physiology
3.00 credits
This course will emphasize advanced physiological mechanisms of human cells including signal transduction pathways, cell cycle regulation, and immune function. These topics will also emphasize the pathophysiology of chronic human diseases that represent a challenge to modern society including cancer, human immunodeficiency virus, and autoimmune disorders. The course will be offered in the Fall or Spring (depending on department needs).
Prerequisite:
HPHY 376 Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 485 Biomedical Engineering
3.00 credits
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the broad field of biomedical engineering. Special focus will be placed on topics such as mechanical properties of biological tissues, biomaterials and their physiological interactions, biocompatibility, biomedical implants, medical imaging, robotics and prosthetics, and biomedical ethics. Spring.
Prerequisite:
(HPHY 375 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 375L Minimum Grade: D) or (HPHY 475 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 475L Minimum Grade: D) or ENSC 301 Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 489 Advanced Topics
2.00- 3.00 credits
An in-depth review of current research literature on specific topics in human physiology. This course prepares students to study, critically review and evaluate, and discuss results of human physiology research. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite:
(HPHY 375 Minimum Grade: D or HPHY 475 Minimum Grade: D) and HPHY 376 Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 490 Directed Study
1.00- 2.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty. Course may be repeated to total not more than 2 credits. By permission from department only. Fall, Spring and Summer.
HPHY 492 Research Techniques
1.00- 2.00 credits
An introduction to some of the experimental techniques used in research in human physiology. Course content may vary with instructor. Course may be repeated to total not more than 2 credits. By permission from department only. Fall, Spring and Summer.
HPHY 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to receive 0 to 6 course credits for professional work experience in a human physiology-related field. The location, duration, learning activities, and specific learning objectives are decided upon through a written agreement established among the student, internship supervisor and the department. This course may be repeated to total not more than 3 credits and is graded as Satisfactory/Non-Satisfactory. By permission from the department only. Credits for this course do not count toward HPHY required elective credits. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 242 Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 242L Minimum Grade: D
HPHY 498 Directed Research
1.00- 2.00 credits
This course provides the motivated student with the opportunity to conduct or assist with a research project under the direction of a human physiology faculty member. Course may be repeated to total not more than 2 credits. Fall, Spring and Summer. By faculty permission only.
HPHY 499 Culminating Experience
1.00 credit
Required of all HPHY majors in their senior or final year. Spring.
Prerequisite:
HPHY 441L Minimum Grade: D and HPHY 442L Minimum Grade: D
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.