Theatre and Dance

Chairperson: Charles Pepiton
Associate Professors:
K. Jeffs, C. Pepiton
Assistant Professors:
S. Ostersmith, C. Smith, L. Stamoolis
Lecturers: P. Erickson, S. Fealk, K. Parbon, R. Childers

The department offers two majors and two minors:

Bachelor of Arts, Theatre Arts major
(required concentration in either Performance or Technical Theatre)
Bachelor of Arts, Dance major
(required concentration in either Dance Pedagogy or Performance)
Minor in Theatre Arts
Minor in Dance

Since the earliest human civilizations, theatre and dance have been integral to the fabric of human communication. The process of performance is woven into personal, community, business, artistic, and religious life - and into the dialogue among the cultures and nations of the world.

Critical examination of this process describes, interprets, and evaluates these relationships. As faculty in the Department of Theatre and Dance, we seek to assist students in becoming effective, creative, and ethically responsible communicators who can understand theoretical choices and design, express, interpret, and critically evaluate oral, written, nonverbal, and electronically mediated messages.

Theatre and Dance, as an academic discipline, draws upon the humanities, the social and natural sciences, and the professions. The curriculum is both conceptual and applied. Courses prepare for an in-depth exploration of one or more areas of inquiry. Teaching and learning methods combine lectures, seminars, workshops, production, and performance. Theatre and Dance at Gonzaga reflects the Catholic, Jesuit character and liberal arts tradition of the institution.

Mission Statement

The Theatre and Dance Department at Gonzaga University is committed to training and developing artists who confront the important issues of our lives through their engagement with the art forms of live theatre and dance.

Students study and critically reflect on a broad range of literature, theatrical forms, and techniques in order to promote an active engagement with the foundations of our culture and to promote the formation of a character that reflects the faith and justice mission of Gonzaga University. The intended outcome of this study and reflection is to provide service to our audience and the broader community and to promote the pursuit for social justice.

Our purpose is to serve young artists hoping to apply disciplined training and thoughtful work to search for justice and the greater good of those around them.

Students interested in a minor that combines the strengths of theatre, dance, visual arts, and music should visit the Interdisciplinary Arts page for more information about the Interdisciplinary Arts Minor. 

B.A. Major in Theatre Arts: 44-49 credits

Lower Division
THEA 100 Introduction to Theatre Arts 3 credits
THEA 200 Theatre History 3 credits
THEA 111 Acting I 4 credits
THEA 216 Acting II 4 credits
THEA 235 Design Process 3 credits
THEA 253 Directing I 3 credits
THEA 260 Technical Lab 2 credits
THEA 261 Performance Lab 2 credits
Two of the following five courses: 6-7 credits
THEA 132 Stagecraft
THEA 134 Costume Construction
THEA 237 Costume and Fashion Design
THEA 239 Lighting Design
THEA 332 Scenic Design
Minimum of two credits from the following courses: 2 credits
THEA 120 Voice and Movement
THEA 124 Ballet I
THEA 125 Jazz Dance I
THEA 224 Contemporary Modern Dance I
THEA 230 Topics in Dance
THEA 320 Ballet II
THEA 321 Jazz Dance II
THEA 322 Musical Theatre Dance
THEA 323 Urban Dance
Upper Division
THEA 354 Directing II 3 credits
THEA 497 Internship 1-3 credits
THEA 498 Senior Project I 1 credit
THEA 499 Senior Project II 1 credit
One of two concentrations: 8-9 credits

Performance concentration:

9 credits
THEA 240 Theatre for Young Audiences 3 credits
THEA 316 Acting for the Camera 4 credits
Two credits from the following courses:
2 credits
THEA 261 Performance Lab
THEA 490-THEA 494 Directed Studies

Technical Theatre concentration:

8-9 credits
One of the following four courses: 3 credits
THEA 134 Costume Construction
THEA 237 Costume and Fashion Design
THEA 239 Lighting Design
THEA 332 Scenic Design
One of the following courses:
3-4 credits
BRCO 204/BRCO 204L Audio Production
BRCO 303 Intermediate Television Production
Two credits from the following courses:
2 credits
THEA 260 Technical Lab
THEA 490-494 Directed Studies

B.A. Major in Dance: 35 credits

Lower Division
THEA 122 Interdisciplinary Arts 3 credits
THEA 227 Principles of Dance Conditioning 3 credits
THEA 228 Dance History 3 credits
THEA 260 Technical Lab 1 credit
Two of the following four courses: 4 credits
THEA 124 Ballet I
THEA 125 Jazz I
THEA 224 Contemporary/Modern I
THEA 226 Accelerated Dance Technique
Upper Division
Two of the following five courses: 6 credits
THEA 320 Ballet II
THEA 321 Jazz II
THEA 322 Musical Theatre Dance
THEA 323 Urban Dance
THEA 324 Modern Dance II
THEA 425 Choreography 3 credits
THEA 496A Strategies for Dance Instruction I 3 credits
THEA 498 Senior Project I 1 credit
   
One of two concentrations:
   

Dance Pedagogy concentration:

8 credits
THEA 426 Advanced Composition and Production 2 credits
THEA 496B Strategies for Dance Instruction II 2 credits

Electives:

4 credits
          EDPE 224 Nutrition for Health and Fitness* (3 credits)  
          EDPE 311 Health, Fitness, & Phys Ed Pedagogical Principles* (3 credits)  
          EDTE 201 Learning Theories and Epistemologies (3 credits)   
          EDTE 221E Elementary Instruction & Assessment** (3 credits)   
THEA 497 Internship (not to exceed 3 credits)
THEA 132 Stagecraft (4 credits) 
THEA 134 Costume Construction (3 credits)
THEA 237 Costume and Fashion Design (3 credits)
THEA 239 Lighting Design (3 credits)
*EDPE 190 prerequisite is waived
**Students taking EDTE 221E must enroll concurrently in THEA 496A or THEA 496B.
 
   

Performance concentration:

8 credits
THEA 226 Accelerated Dance Technique 2 credits
THEA 426 Advanced Composition and Production 2 credits
Electives: 4 credits
           EDPE 224 Nutrition for Health and Fitness (3 credits)   
THEA 120 Voice and Movement (3 credits)
THEA 226 Accelerated Dance Technique (2 credits, can be repeated) 
THEA 260 Technical Lab (not to exceed 2 credits)
THEA 261 Performance Lab (not to exceed 4 credits)
THEA 320-324 Additional Upper-Division Performance Courses (3 credits) 
THEA 497 Internship (not to exceed 3 credits)
THEA 496B Strategies for Dance Instruction II (2 credits) 
THEA 132 Stagecraft (4 credits) 
THEA 134 Costume Construction (3 credits)
THEA 237 Costume and Fashion Design (3 credits)
THEA 239 Lighting Design (3 credits) 

Minor in Theatre Arts: 20-21 credits

Lower Division
THEA 100 Introduction to Theatre Arts 3 credits
THEA 111 Acting I 4 credits
One of the following three courses: 3-4 credits
THEA 132 Stagecraft
THEA 134 Costume Construction
THEA 237 Costume and Fashion Design
THEA 200 Theatre History 3 credits
THEA 235 Design Process 3 credits
THEA 261 Performance Lab 1 credit
Upper Division
One of the following three courses:
3 credits
THEA 240 Theatre for Young Audiences
THEA 253 Directing I
THEA 332 Scenic Design

Minor in Dance: 20 credits

Lower Division
One of the following theory/practice courses: 3 credits
THEA 122 Interdisciplinary Arts
THEA 227 Principles of Dance Conditioning
Two of the following technique/practice courses: 4 credits
THEA 124 Ballet I
THEA 125 Jazz I
THEA 224 Contemporary Modern Dance I
THEA 226 Accelerated Dance Technique
THEA 228 Dance History
3 credits
One of the following courses: 1 credit
THEA 260 Technical Lab
THEA 261 Performance Lab
Upper Division
One of the following performance courses: 3 credits
THEA 320 Ballet II
THEA 321 Jazz II
THEA 322 Musical Theatre Dance
THEA 323 Urban Dance
THEA 324 Modern Dance II
THEA 425 Choreography 3 credits
THEA 496A Strategies for Dance Instruction I 3 credits
Lower Division
THEA 100 Introduction to Theatre Arts
3.00 credits
An introductory survey of the history, aesthetics, and literature of the theatre, and the various areas of theatrical production. Fall and Spring.
THEA 111 Acting I
4.00 credits
An introduction to the techniques of dramatic expression utilizing the body, voice, and imagination. Structured play exercise helps the beginner to overcome physical/vocal inhibitions, and develop a sense of trust and teamwork within the group. Scene work is approached using beats, intentions, scores of physical actions, obstacles, and subtext. The class concludes with a recital to provide practical experience in rehearsal and performance. Fall and Spring.
THEA 120 Voice and Movement
3.00 credits
An introduction to expressively engaging the entire physical instrument in life and performance. Coursework focuses on a variety of techniques designed to develop an increased range of physical and vocal expression. The course features experimentation in a studio setting and practical/creative application through rehearsal and performance. Fall, odd years.
THEA 122 Interdisciplinary Arts
3.00 credits
This course uses concepts of theatre-, dance-, and visual arts-based research to solve problems. Students will be exposed, through lecture and assignments, to theories and methods from each art form and will learn to integrate the art forms to explore complex concepts through performance. Fall.
THEA 124 Ballet I
2.00 credits
Beginning instruction in ballet. This course includes the technique, vocabulary and history of classical ballet. May be repeated. Fall.
THEA 125 Jazz Dance I
2.00 credits
Beginning and continuing instruction in jazz dance. This course includes the technique, vocabulary and history of the genre. May be repeated. Fall.
THEA 130 Topics in Dance
1.00- 2.00 credits
Advanced courses, visiting artists, cultural dance. Periodic offering.
THEA 132 Stagecraft
4.00 credits
The theory and practice of the construction and painting of scenery and props, the fundamentals of stage lighting, and the organization of technical work in the theatre. Includes a lab component. Fall.
THEA 134 Costume Construction
3.00 credits
In this class we will seek to understand the overall breadth of the field, with an introduction to its areas of specialization; beginning stitching, patterning, and crafting techniques, and individual contributions to the work of the Gonzaga Costume Shop, as well as a personal construction project. Fall.
THEA 190 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
THEA 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
THEA 200 Theatre History
3.00 credits
A study of the theatre as an expression of life and culture from a primitive ritual to the 21st century. Theatre literature, performance practice, and theatre architecture will be studied within the larger context of the culture form which the various types of theatrical expression are derived. Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite:
THEA 100 Minimum Grade: D
THEA 216 Acting II
4.00 credits
An intensive study of the acting process building on skills developed in Acting I (THEA 111). The course focuses on character development in psychological realism and other modern forms and is intended to expand the actor's range with both scene and monologue work, as well as to expand skills in voice/body integration and script analysis. Spring.
Prerequisite:
THEA 111 Minimum Grade: D
THEA 222 E-Portfolio
.00 credits
In this zero credit course taken each fall of sophomore and junior years, Interdisciplinary Arts Minor students will submit work from the year before into an e-portfolio format. This will be reviewed by the Director and the student in a scheduled meeting, reviewing ideas for the senior synthesis project and ensuring they are on track with coursework.
THEA 224 Contemporary Modern Dance I
2.00 credits
Analysis and theory of modern dance with an emphasis on basic technique and movement exploration. Includes a study of the evolution of modern dance and its past and present pioneers. May be repeated. Fall.
THEA 226 Accelerated Dance Technique
2.00 credits
A continued study of ballet with an emphasis on artistry, choreography and intermediate level technique. Includes a critical analysis of past and present classical dance works. Completion of THEA 124 Ballet I recommended. May be repeated. Fall and Spring.
THEA 227 Princ of Dance Conditioning
3.00 credits
This course will provide student dancers scientific information for understanding the human body, injury prevention and enhanced longevity and performance. Students will be given the tools to connect the anatomy and physiology of the body to dance while performing practical exercises to allow application of the knowledge learned. Spring, even years.
THEA 228 Dance History
3.00 credits
This course will look at dance as a reflection of culture and as an art form from earliest societies to the present, focusing primarily on western dance history. Fall.
THEA 230 Topics in Dance
1.00- 2.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor. Periodic offering.
THEA 235 Design Process
3.00 credits
This course covers the fundamentals of the process of designing for the theatre - developing the design from the initial script study through the collaborative process in design meetings. Learning how to “see” and developing points of view and approaches are studied. The course will also cover the business of design, working in regional theatres and other professional venues. Fall, even years.
THEA 237 Costume and Fashion Design
3.00 credits
This course examines the role of costume design in the performance storytelling process for stage and fashion. Utilizing classic design principles and tools, including color theory and artistic media, we will explore turning texts into visual images through script analysis, character interpretation, use of historical dress, and artistic inspirations. Spring.
THEA 239 Lighting Design
3.00 credits
An introduction to the technical procedures, equipment, organization, drafting, and design principles of theatrical lighting. Students will design and execute lighting for main stage productions. Spring.
THEA 240 Theatre for Young Audiences
3.00 credits
An introduction to the artistic, pedagogical, and entrepreneurial methods for producing theatre for (and with) young audiences. Coursework features practical rehearsal and performance, a survey of major Theatre for Young Audience plays, applied theatre techniques, and curriculum development. This class is intended for students seeking to become teachers (inside and outside of theatre arts classrooms) and those interested in performing for K-12 audiences. Spring, even years.
THEA 253 Directing I
3.00 credits
The fundamental techniques of play analysis, actor communication, and composition are introduced and applied to model plays. Organizational, leadership, and conceptual skills are developed as students audition, cast, and rehearse chosen scenes from the modern realistic repertoire for performance. Fall.
Prerequisite:
THEA 111 Minimum Grade: D
THEA 260 Technical Lab
1.00 credit
Introductory level participation in one or more phases of the technical production process (set construction, costume construction, lighting, sound, etc.) Spring and Fall.
THEA 261 Performance Lab
1.00 credit
Performance of a role in a main stage theatre production. Spring and Fall.
THEA 290 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
THEA 293 Special Topics
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by Instructor.
THEA 294 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by Instructor.
Upper Division
THEA 316 Acting For The Camera
4.00 credits
With experience of basic acting techniques in hand, the student actor works in front of the camera to meet the challenges of electronic media. Simplicity of presentation, performance of the authentic person, and active listening are key skills. Work is in a variety of forms, from feature films to public service announcements. The class concludes with a public showing of student work. Periodic offering.
Prerequisite:
THEA 111 Minimum Grade: D
THEA 320 Ballet II
3.00 credits
This intermediate course in ballet focuses on technique, vocabulary, and choreography. Student participants in public performance. May be repeated. Spring.
Prerequisite:
THEA 124 Minimum Grade: D or THEA 226 Minimum Grade: D
THEA 321 Jazz Dance II
3.00 credits
This intermediate course in jazz dance focuses on technique, vocabulary, choreography and performance studies. Dancers participate in public performances of the spring dance concert. May be repeated. Spring.
Prerequisite:
THEA 125 Minimum Grade: D
THEA 322 Musical Theatre Dance
3.00 credits
Examination of the unique history of musical theatre dance. Practice in the techniques and choreographic styles required for performance in musicals. Dancer will participate in the annual spring dance concert. May be repeated. Spring, even years.
THEA 323 Urban Dance
3.00 credits
This intermediate dance course introduces the history and physical styles of hip hop, fusion, funk and world dance. This performance based course includes a public performance in the spring dance concert. Completion of THEA 125 Jazz I recommended. Spring, odd years.
THEA 324 Modern Dance II
3.00 credits
This intermediate course in modern dance focuses on technique, movement exploration, choreography and performance studies. Dancers participate in public performances of the spring dance concert. May be repeated. Spring.
Prerequisite:
THEA 224 Minimum Grade: D
THEA 330 Topics in Dance
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor. Periodic Offering.
THEA 332 Scenic Design
3.00 credits
Theory and application of the process used to design theatrical scenery. Students will begin to develop and apply skills in script analysis, theatre drafting, model building, collage, and research techniques with the intent to design scenery for live theatre performance. Fall, odd years.
THEA 354 Directing II
3.00 credits
With a foundation in conceptualization, play analysis, actor communication, and design, student directors will create a vision for a short play. Student directors cast their shows and collaborate with a design team to realize the production in a public performance. Emphasis is placed on building conceptually rich, unified productions and the development of an individual creative voice. Spring.
Prerequisite:
THEA 253 Minimum Grade: D
THEA 390 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
THEA 425 Choreography
3.00 credits
Dynamics, rhythm, design, motivation, gesture and improvisation are explored as basic elements for building dance. Final project is a public performance of choreographic work. Spring.
THEA 426 Adv Composition and Production
2.00 credits
This course builds on the coursework from THEA 425. With a foundation in dance conceptualization, analysis, communication, and choreography, students will create advanced compositions and learn from the production of the Fall Dance Concert. Emphasis is placed on building conceptually rich, unified productions and the development of an individual creative voice while learning what it takes to produce a professional dance concert with guest artists. Fall.
Prerequisite:
THEA 425 Minimum Grade: B
THEA 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
THEA 440 Playwriting
3.00 credits
This course is designed to provide students with the necessary tools to create dramatic texts for reading and performance. Through play reading assignments and exercises devised to tap into different modes of creative generation, students will discover methodologies for developing new work. Students will hear their work read by actors in a 10-minute play festival. By the end of the semester, students will complete a short one-act play. Fall, even years.
THEA 480 Theatre Seminar
1.00- 4.00 credits
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Permission from Department Chair required. Upon sufficient demand.
THEA 481 Theatre Seminar
1.00- 3.00 credits
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Permission from Department Chair required. Upon sufficient demand.
THEA 482 Theatre Seminar
1.00- 3.00 credits
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Permission from Department Chair required. Upon sufficient demand.
THEA 483 Theatre Seminar
1.00- 3.00 credits
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Permission of instructor required. Upon sufficient demand.
THEA 484 Theatre Seminar
1.00 credit
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Permission of instructor required. Upon sufficient demand.
THEA 485 Theatre Seminar
1.00- 3.00 credits
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Permission of instructor required. Upon sufficient demand.
THEA 486 Theatre Seminar
1.00- 3.00 credits
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Permission of instructor required. Upon sufficient demand.
THEA 487 Theatre Seminar
1.00- 3.00 credits
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Permission of instructor required. Upon sufficient demand.
THEA 488 Theatre Seminar
1.00- 3.00 credits
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Pre-requisite: permission of instructor. On sufficient demand.
THEA 489 Theatre Seminar
1.00- 6.00 credits
Intensive study of a particular aspect of theatre. Permission of instructor required. Upon sufficient demand.
THEA 490 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Students will take leadership in one of the following areas of applied theatrical production: stage management, lighting design, scenic design, sound design, costume design or directing.
THEA 491 Directed Study
1.00- 2.00 credits
Students will take leadership in one of the following areas of applied theatrical production: stage management, lighting design, scenic design, sound design, costume design or directing.
THEA 492 Directed Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Students will take leadership in one of the following areas of applied theatrical production: stage management, lighting design, scenic design, sound design, costume design or directing.
THEA 493 Directed Study
1.00- 2.00 credits
Students will take leadership in one of the following areas of applied theatrical production: stage management, lighting design, scenic design, sound design, costume design, or directing.
THEA 494 Directed Study
1.00- 2.00 credits
Students will take leadership in one of the following areas of applied theatrical production: stage management, lighting design, scenic design, sound design, costume design or directing.
THEA 496A Strategies: Dance Instruct I
3.00 credits
In the first part of this year-long course, students will learn a variety of teaching styles and strategies, curriculum planning and evaluation methods, and then will have the opportunity to develop their own teaching style through a service learning teaching component. Emphasis is placed on learning to build a positive classroom environment while meeting the needs of various levels of dance students. Fall.
THEA 496B Strategies for Dance Inst II
2.00 credits
Continuation of THEA 496A. Students will continue exploring a variety of teaching styles and strategies, curriculum planning and evaluation methods, while preparing their ZagDancers for their final performance. Spring.
Prerequisite:
THEA 496A Minimum Grade: D
THEA 497 Internship
1.00- 3.00 credits
Professional work experience in theatre related field. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
THEA 498 Senior Project I
1.00 credit
A career preparation and individual artistic development experience in a cohort and mentorship setting. Students will engage in self-initiated as well as guided exercises to prepare for life and career after graduation. Development of senior project, to be completed in THEA 499 in the spring. Fall.
THEA 499 Senior Project II
1.00 credit
A continuation of THEA 498 with more emphasis placed on implementing a senior project in partial fulfillment of the department’s major requirements. Spring.
Prerequisite:
THEA 498 Minimum Grade: D
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.