Environmental Studies

Department Chair: Brian G. Henning
Professor:
B. Henning, K. HenricksonJ. Isacoff, J. Jozwiak
Associate Professor: B. Bancroft, G. Gordon
Assistant Professor: S. Hayes

The Environmental Studies major offers students an interdisciplinary approach toward understanding the human interaction with the environment.  Drawing upon courses in the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities, the Environmental Studies major offers a diverse, integrated curriculum that explores the scientific, ethical, social, and political aspects of our current environmental crisis. With our proximity to state and national parks, national forests, and open space, Gonzaga is a special place to pursue environmental studies, where students can engage both their intellectual and experiential pursuits. Students in the Environmental Studies major have abundant opportunities for field studies and research, outdoor service learning projects, environmental internships, and develop leadership positions with on-campus environmental organizations, such as the Gonzaga Environmental Organization (GEO).  Environmental Studies majors are also encouraged to pursue field courses and study abroad opportunities in places like Zambia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Australia, among others.

The 39-credit Environmental Studies Major has two main components: seven non-substitutable foundational courses and a minimum of five additional courses drawn from various disciplines around the University.


B.A. Major in Environmental Studies: 39 credits

Environmental Studies Foundational requirements: 24 credits
ENVS 101 Introduction to Environmental Studies 3 credits
ENVS 102 Environmental Politics and Policy 3 credits
One of the following two courses with lab:
4 credits
BIOL 206/BIOL 206L Ecology and Lab

(BIOL Double-Majors and BIOL Minors ONLY take this course)

ENVS 103/ENVS 103L Environmental Biology and Lab

One of the following three course options:
3-5credits
ENVS 104/ ENVS 104L Environmental Chemistry and Lab

CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 230/CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry and Lab

ENVS 200 Case Studies in Environmental Science 4 credits
ENVS 358 Environmental Ethics 3 credits
ENVS 499 Symposium in Environmental Studies 3 credits

Environmental Studies Distribution and Electives: 15 credits
ENVS 320-339 or ENVS 398 Social Sciences 6 credits
ENVS 340-379 or ENVS 397 Humanities 6 credits
ENVS 300-399 or ENVS 497 Electives 3 credits

 

Minor in Environmental Studies: 20 credits

Lower Division
ENVS 101 Introduction to Environmental Studies 3 credits
One of the following five course options:
3-5 credits
BIOL 206/BIOL 206L Ecology and Lab
  (BIOL Majors Only )

CHEM 205 Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 230/CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry and Lab;

ENVS 103/ENVS 103L Environmental Biology and Lab

ENVS 104/ENVS 104L Environmental Chemistry and Lab

ENVS 200 Case Studies in Environmental Science 4 credits
Upper Division
ENVS 358 Environmental Ethics 3 credits
ENVS 320-339 or ENVS 398 Social Sciences 3 credits
ENVS 340-379 or ENVS 397 Humanities 3 credits
Lower Division
ENVS 101 Intro to Environmental Studies
3.00 credits
An introduction to the field of Environmental Studies. The course provides an overview of the connections between science, politics, philosophy, history, and ethics regarding nature and the environment. The course urges students to think critically about the relationships between knowledge and judgment, humans and nature, justice and ethics, and natural and human history. Fall and Spring.
ENVS 102 Environmental Politics &Policy
3.00 credits
This course examines the politics and policymaking process of environmental issues. The course focuses primarily on American national policy, but also on state and local and international/global policy. The course is designed to evoke and encourage thinking about environmental issues on these various levels.Spring.
ENVS 103 Environmental Biology
3.00 credits
A study of the principles of ecology (including population dynamics, diversity, and energy flow) and the impact humans have on the environment. Lab is required. Designed for non-science majors. Fall.
Concurrent:
ENVS 103L
ENVS 103L Environmental Biology Lab
1.00 credit
See course description for ENVS 103. Fall.
Concurrent:
ENVS 103
ENVS 104 Environmental Chemistry
3.00 credits
This course will cover the fundamental principles of chemistry necessary to understand the source and fate of chemical substances in the environment. Additional topics will be dependent on the instructor but may include the environmental implications of energy utilization; the chemistry of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere; climate change; and pollution and treatment of water sources. Spring.
Concurrent:
ENVS 104L
Equivalent:
CHEM 123 - OK if taken since Fall 2009
ENVS 104L Environmental Chemistry Lab
1.00 credit
See course description for ENVS 104. Spring.
Concurrent:
ENVS 104
Equivalent:
CHEM 123L - OK if taken since Summer 1 2009
ENVS 190 Independent Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
ENVS 193 FYS:
3.00 credits
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
ENVS 200 Case Studies in Env Science
4.00 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to scientific issues and concepts related to environmental problems. The course will consist of investigations of a number of specific cases of environmental impacts by humans, such as: chemical contamination of soils, air, or water; overexploitation of fisheries or other living resources; freshwater availability and quality; habitat conversion, fragmentation, and loss of biodiversity; invasive species; renewable and non-renewable energy sources; and the production and management of waste. Specific cases will vary from semester to semester, and will include examples of current local, regional and global relevance. Laboratory exercises will allow students to investigate the scientific principles important for understanding the cases, and will help students develop an appreciation for the strength and limitations of scientific knowledge in addressing environmental issues. Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: C- or ENVS 103 Minimum Grade: C- or BIOL 123 Minimum Grade: C- or ENVS 104 Minimum Grade: C-
ENVS 290 Independent Study
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
Upper Division
ENVS 303 Conservation Biology
3.00 credits
This course covers the biological concepts important for the conservation of natural populations, communities, and ecosystems. Both theoretical and empirical studies will be applied to such topics as: the genetics and ecology of small populations, consequences of habitat degradation and fragmentation, the impact of introduced species, and the ecological value of biological diversity. Students who do not have a major in the sciences are encouraged to talk to the instructor about their preparations for this course at the time of registration. Spring.
Prerequisite:
BIOL 102 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 206 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 123 Minimum Grade: D or ENVS 103 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
BIOL 323 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
ENVS 303L Conservation Biology Lab
1.00 credit
This lab includes field trips. Taken concurrently with ENVS 303.
Concurrent:
ENVS 303
Equivalent:
BIOL 323L - OK if taken since Spring 2009
ENVS 320 Econ of Enviromental Protectn
3.00 credits
Explores the economic dimensions of environmental topics such as air and water pollution, deforestation, non-renewable resource depletion, recycling, global warming. The course studies the extent of environmental problems and alternative solutions. Fall.
Prerequisite:
ECON 201 Minimum Grade: D or ECON 270H Minimum Grade: D or ECON 200 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
ECON 304 - OK if taken between Fall 2007 and Fall 2016
ECON 324 - OK if taken since Fall 2016
ENVS 321 Ecological Thought & Politics
3.00 credits
This Service Learning course focuses on the writings of seminal figures in American ecological thought, such as John Muir, Gifford Pinchot, and Aldo Leopold. Examines the history and politics of land use and wilderness planning. Class will go on field trips in partnership with the United States Forest Service (USFS) and local environmental groups to learn first-hand about the politics of local land use. Fall.
Equivalent:
POLS 317 - OK if taken since Spring 2008
ENVS 322 Global Environmental Politics
3.00- 4.00 credits
This course is offered through the School for Field Studies program. Please contact the Environmental Studies Department Chair for additional information.
Equivalent:
POLS 375 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
ENVS 323 Principles of Wildlife Mgmt
3.00 credits
The ecology, theory, methods, and philosophy of wildlife management emphasizing game, nongame, and endangered species. Students gain an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of various government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Fall, alternate years.
Prerequisite:
ENVS 103 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 123 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
ENVS 323L
Equivalent:
BIOL 357 - OK if taken since Fall 2008
ENVS 323L Princ of Wildlife Mgmt Lab
1.00 credit
This lab includes field trips. Taken concurrently with ENVS 323L.
Concurrent:
ENVS 323
Equivalent:
BIOL 357L - Successful completion
ENVS 325 Native American Govt & Pol
3.00 credits
Surveys Native American politics and government today and provides students a sense of the origins and development of Native American government and politics. Analyzes the role of Native American governments in American inter-governmental relations and develops an appreciation for the capacities and policy goals of Native American governments as well as the social (health, education, and welfare) and environmental circumstances of Native American government and politics. Fall.
ENVS 326 Environmental Sociology
3.00 credits
This course examines human relationships with the natural environment. It explores how power structures, social norms, ideologies and politics affect our relationship and treatment of the environment.
Equivalent:
SOCI 383 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
ENVS 329 N Amer Environmental Policies
3.00 credits
State and society in the Pacific Northwest: government, parties, reform movements, regionalism, and social forces in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, and British Columbia and Alberta. Regional issues such as taxation, health care, urbanization, land use, education, the environment, and resource-based economics are addressed in a comparative Canadian-U.S. context. Fall.
ENVS 330 Parks, Forests, and Wildlife
3.00 credits
In this course we explore the past, present, and future of public lands. Focusing primarily on national and state parks, national forests, and wildlife, this course traces the development and application of the U.S. conservation model, both domestically and abroad.
ENVS 350 Ethics: Global Climate Change
3.00 credits
Many have described global climate change as the defining challenge of the 21st century, noting that unless dramatic changes are made today, future generations will suffer terrible consequences, such as rising seas, wars over fresh water, tens of millions of environmental refugees, and the extinction of species such as the polar bear. This course will investigate the complex technological, historical, economic, scientific, political, and philosophical issues surrounding this issue. Global warming skeptics are especially encouraged to enroll. Spring and Summer.
Equivalent:
PHIL 460 - OK if taken since Fall 2009
ENVS 351 Environmental Health
3.00 credits
This course will examine the impact of selected environmental factors on health. Environmental factors examined will include air quality, water quality, geography and climate, urbanization, and poverty. Basic epidemiological concepts and study designed will be introduced as tools for understanding reports about health conditions caused by the environment.
ENVS 352 Environmental Law & Policy
3.00 credits
This course provides students with an overview of the substance and procedures relating to environmental regulation and protection in the United States. The course provides some technical understanding of the laws governing the use of resources and the control of pollution discharges. The course addresses, among other topics: the consumption of natural resources that resulted in environmental pollution; the political and policy context in which environmental policies have been formulated and the administrative or regulatory procedures required by statutory law or judicial decisions to heal with various environmental issues.
ENVS 353 Environmental History
3.00 credits
In examining the dynamic relationship between humans and their environment over time, this course explores how nature affects cultural responses and how humans, in turn, have shaped the world around them. Employing a multidisciplinary approach this course draws upon ecological, historical, economic, or political analysis to illuminate the varied relationships between people and place.
Equivalent:
HIST 365 - OK if taken since Fall 2018
ENVS 358 Environmental Ethics
3.00 credits
The detailed philosophical study of humanity's understanding of its relationship to the natural environment, concentrating on historically prominent conceptions of that relationship, and the philosophical foundation of the contemporary environment movement.
Prerequisite:
PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D or WOMS 237C Minimum Grade: D or WGST 237C Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent:
PHIL 458 - OK if taken since Summer 1 2012
ENVS 380 Politics of the Pacific NW
3.00 credits
State and society in the Pacific Northwest: government, parties, reform movements, regionalism, and social forces in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, and British Columbia and Alberta. Regional issues such as taxation, health care, urbanization, land use, education, the environment, and resource-based economics are addressed in a comparative Canadian-U.S. context.
Equivalent:
POLS 328 - OK if taken since Fall 2013
ENVS 381 Ethics of Eating
3.00 credits
An examination of ethical issues surrounding the consumption, production and transportation of food. Issues such as organic food, GMOs, vegetarianism, local and slow food movements, and hunger may be covered. Ethical issues surrounding both local and international food issues are treated.
Equivalent:
PHIL 459 - OK if taken since Fall 2013
ENVS 382 Population and Society
3.00 credits
There are more people on this planet than ever before, and the problems associated with population growth seem to be everywhere. Urban crowding, disease, poverty, ethnic tensions, refugees, illegal immigration, environmental degradation, unemployment, aging and the social security “crisis” are just a few of these troubles.
ENVS 384 GIS & Ecological Techniques
3.00 credits
This course will introduce students to geographic information systems (GIS) and focus on how GIS can be used to address research and management questions in ecology. Student will use existing GIS databases from area resource agencies and learn how to create new GIS databases from field exercises. Field techniques will include vegetation sampling, small mammal trapping, amphibian/reptile monitoring, distance sampling, wildlife habitat assessment, and mapping exercises using compass and global position systems (GPS). Spring, even years.
Prerequisite:
ENVS 103 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
ENVS 384L
Equivalent:
BIOL 344 - OK if taken since Spring 2019
ENVS 384L GIS & Ecological TechniquesLab
1.00 credit
Taken concurrently with ENVS 384.
Prerequisite:
ENVS 103 Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent:
ENVS 384
Equivalent:
BIOL 344L - OK if taken since Spring 2019
ENVS 390 Independent Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
ENVS 397 Special Topics:ENVS Humanities
3.00- 4.00 credits
Topics to be determined by instructor.
ENVS 398 SpecialTopic:ENVSSocialStudies
3.00- 4.00 credits
Topics to be determined by instructor.
ENVS 399 Special Topics:ENVS Electives
3.00- 4.00 credits
Topics to be determined by instructor.
ENVS 432 CIS:
3.00 credits
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
ENVS 490 Independent Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Topic to be determined by faculty.
ENVS 497 Internship
.00- 6.00 credits
Professional experience in environmental studies-related field. Students must take the initiative to contact an agency and a faculty member willing to supervise the internship.
ENVS 499 Symposium in Env Studies
3.00 credits
This capstone experience is designed to help Environmental Studies students integrate their experience and perspectives and apply them to specific environmental issue. Students will be expected to produce a major written analysis of a current complex environmental issue facing the Inland Northwest. Projects undertaken by individual students, small groups or even the entire class. Class meetings will involve discussions of background readings, coordination of work on the projects, presentations and critiques of draft reports, and opportunities for students from different majors to share their expertise and perspectives on the issues being investigated. Spring.
 
Second Language Competency

Competency in a second language (classical or modern) at the intermediate level (courses numbered 201) is required for students continuing in the study of a language. Students beginning study in a language they have not previously studied can fulfill the requirement by completing one year at the beginning level (courses numbered 101-102). Non-native speakers of English who have completed the required English core credits at Gonzaga may petition the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences for a waiver of this requirement.

Additional information on this requirement can be found at

Language Requirement Information

 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.