Master of Science in Nursing

Chairperson: Lin Murphy
Professors: N. Crogan, S. Boysen, M. McFarland (Emeritus) 
Associate Professors: L. Murphy, J. Ramirez, J. Tiedt
Assistant Professors: N. Dhanaswar, J. Isaacson, C. Kottwitz, K. Manion, D. OgorekJ. Owens, B. Senger
Senior Lecturer: N. BeckhamD. Smith
Lecturers: A. Argyle, C. Chacon, M. DeNysschen, J. Derzay, D. Doud, S. Edwards, J. Garrity, D. Jacobson, K. Magonigle, C. McGuire, D. Peck, K. Slater, L. Torretta

Introduction

The Department of Nursing offers three advanced education nursing options at the master’s level: the accelerated RN to MSN (Master of Science in Nursing), the MSN, and second Master's in Nursing. Each of these options emphasize leadership, the integration of theoretical concepts from nursing and related disciplines, and the application of these theories to practice. Both role development and preparation in a specialty area are emphasized. Grounded in Jesuit and nursing values, the MSN program prepares Registered Nurses to assume roles as Family Nurse Practitioners, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioners,  or Health Systems Leaders. With Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) as the organizing framework for the curriculum, the program builds on the themes of servant leadership, social justice, community, and reflective practice. Gonzaga's MSN program is offered in an online, distance delivery format with scheduled on-campus immersions. This format enables nurses in geographically isolated areas and those who are unable to attend an on-campus program to pursue advanced nursing education and still continue to provide much-needed nursing services in their home communities while completing graduate studies. Graduates are qualified to take the national certification examinations for their areas of specialization. National certification is a requirement for licensure as a nurse practitioner in most states. Students are responsible for checking, and adhering to, state mandates for practice while in the student role and in an advanced nursing role.

Program Overview

Students who enter the master's program through the accelerated RN to MSN option complete a total of five courses (15 credits) that "bridge" them to the graduate-level courses. After completing these "bridge" courses, they progress directly to the core courses in the MSN program provided they have successfully completed all bridge courses with a grade of “C” or better and have maintained a minimum GPA of 3.0. They then matriculate to the Health Systems Leader MSN track.

Students with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree are admitted directly into the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program. Students apply for admission to one of three specialty tracks: Family Nurse Practitioner (47 credits), Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (47 credits), or the Health Systems Leadership track (36 credits).

Students with a non-nursing bachelor’s degree and Registered Nurse license are also able to be admitted directly into the Master of Science in Nursing program, but must complete a minimum of four pre-requisite courses prior to starting the master’s-level courses. They complete four undergraduate prerequisite courses (12 credits), and five MSN core courses (15 credits) prior to advancing to and progressing through one of the specialty tracks (additional 21-32 credits).

In the nurse practitioner tracks, students complete courses in advanced pathophysiology and pharmacology, advanced health assessment, and the direct care core courses that prepare them for advanced practice. Students in these pathways complete 600 hours (10 credits) of practicum or clinical experience in their specialty area. Students preparing for the advanced role specialty of Health Systems Leader complete the core courses for the specialty track as well as 360 hours of practicum (6 credits).

The second master’s degree option is designed for the Registered Nurse who already possesses a master’s degree in nursing but desires additional preparation in another specialty area. The program is structured to meet the needs and schedules of working Registered Nurses through the same distance delivery format used in the MSN program. The total credits required may vary depending on each student’s background and preparation.

Students are referred to the relevant Department of Nursing Student Handbook for a more detailed overview of requirements and expectations.  There are separate handbooks for the BSN, MSN, and DNP programs.

RN to MSN Program (for Registered Nurses)

The RN to MSN option offers the licensed Registered Nurse with a diploma or an associate's degree in nursing the opportunity to earn a master's degree in nursing in less time and with fewer credits than would be required if completing separate BSN and MSN degrees. The MSN is the degree awarded; there is no option for earning a separate BSN degree. In an effort to meet the needs of working Registered Nurses, the program is offered in an online distance delivery format with scheduled on-campus immersions during the MSN coursework. Students complete five courses (15 credits) that "bridge" them to the master's level courses: NURS 320 – Statistics for Health Professionals, NURS 406 – Nursing Research, NURS 463 – Community Health, NURS 464 – Community Health Practicum, PHIL 280 – Persons & Conduct. Upon successful completion of the "bridge" courses, students’ progress immediately to the graduate level courses with an emphasis on preparation for an advanced role as a Health Systems Leader.

Admission Requirements RN to MSN Program

At the time of application to the RN to MSN program, the applicant also applies for admission to Gonzaga University. The applicant must have an associate's degree in nursing from a regionally accredited college or a diploma in nursing from a state-approved program and must submit one official transcript from each college, university, and/or nursing program attended. The decision to admit an applicant to the RN to MSN program is based on consideration of the individual's overall portfolio including:

  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better (4.0 scale).
  2. Evidence of a current unencumbered RN license.
  3. One official transcript from every college and university or nursing school attended.  Only degrees and courses from regionally accredited institutions will be accepted.
  4. Current curriculum vitae (CV).
  5. Two letters of recommendation from individuals such as employers, colleagues, or professors who can attest to the applicant’s leadership, interpersonal skills, professional practice, critical thinking and judgment, and potential for advanced study.
  6. Typewritten statement that describes the applicant’s:
    a)    interest in the RN to MSN Program and Health Systems Leader option
    b)    professional goals
    c)    personal and professional strengths
    d)    professional experiences
  7. Non-native English speakers are required to provide proof of English proficiency.  Gonzaga University accepts the following:
    a)    score of 6.5 or better on the IELTS or
    b)    official TOEFL score of at least 88 ibt or 580 pbt or
    c)    completion of an Associate's degree in Nursing or a diploma in Nursing from an institution where English is the primary medium of instruction.

Degree Requirements

The RN to MSN program requires the completion of five "bridge" courses (15 credits) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in order to progress to MSN-level course work.

RN to MSN

Bridge Courses: 15 Credits

PHIL 280 Person and Conduct
3 credits
NURS 320 Statistics for Health Professionals 3 credits
NURS 406 Nursing Research 3 credits
NURS 463 Community Health 3 credits
NURS 464 Community Health Practicum 3 credits

Graduate (MSN) Courses:

Achievement of a grade of B or better is expected in graduate studies. Students who have successfully completed the "bridge" courses with a minimum grade of “C” and have achieved a minimum GPA of 3.0 progress directly to the Health Systems Leadership MSN level courses.

Admissions Requirements to the MSN Program

At the time of application to the MSN program, the applicant also applies for admission to Gonzaga University. The applicant must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university, be licensed as a Registered Nurse, and submit one official transcript from each college, university, and/or nursing program attended.

Students who have an RN license with a bachelor’s degree in another field must take some foundational nursing courses before completing master’s-level courses, e.g., statistics, research, philosophy, and community health nursing. The decision to admit an applicant to the MSN program is based on consideration of the individual's overall portfolio including:
  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better (4.0 scale).
  2. Evidence of a current unencumbered RN license.
  3. One official transcript from every college, university, and/or nursing program attended. Only degrees and/or courses from regionally accredited institutions will be accepted.
  4. Current curriculum vitae (CV).
  5. Two letters of recommendation from individuals such as employers, colleagues, or professors who can attest to the applicant’s leadership, interpersonal skills, professional practice, critical thinking and judgment, and potential for advanced study. (Those applying the FNP track are required to have a letter of recommendation from a supervisor.)
  6. Typewritten statement that describes the applicant’s:
    a)    interest in the MSN Program and specific MSN track
    b)    professional goals
    c)    personal and professional strengths
    d)    professional experiences
  7. Non-native English speakers are required to provide proof of English proficiency.  Gonzaga University accepts the following:
    a)    score of 6.5 or better on the IELTS, or
    b)    official TOEFL score of at least 88 ibt or 580 pbt, or
    c)    completion of an Associate's degree in Nursing or a diploma in nursing from an institution where English is the primary medium of instruction.

Required Core Courses for All MSN Tracks: 15 Credits

All of the core courses are offered online and must be completed for each of the specialty tracks. These courses provide the theoretical foundation for role development and expose the students to concepts and issues that undergird all areas of advanced nursing practice. Courses include content in health policy analysis and development, information management, evidence-based practice, and leadership.

NURS 561 Information Technology and Data Management 3 credits
NURS 562 Theoretical Foundations for Healthcare Improvement 3 credits
NURS 563 Evidenced-Based Practice for Quality and Safety 3 credits
NURS 564 Contemporary Healthcare Environment 3 credits
NURS 565 Clinical Prevention for Diverse Populations 3 credits

Health Systems Leadership (HSL) Track: 36 Credits (including Core)

This track prepares Registered Nurses to assume leadership and administrative positions in inpatient, ambulatory care, and community-based settings. Students gain knowledge and competency in financial and human capital management, as well as strategies for responding to the ethical and legal issues encountered in administrative roles. The HSL core courses are offered online. Practicum experiences are arranged by the student to meet identified learning needs. There is a required two-day, on-campus immersion during the last practicum course.

Health Systems Leadership Core: 15 Credits
NURS 641A Nursing Leadership Development 3 credits
NURS 642A Quality and Information Management 3 credits
NURS 643A Communication and Relationship Management 3 credits
NURS 644A Health Care Management 3 credits
NURS 645A Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Healthcare Environments 3 credits
Health Systems Leadership Practicum: 6 Credits (360 hours)
NURS 631A Health Systems Leadership Practicum I 1-3 credits
NURS 632A Health Systems Leadership Practicum II 1-3 credits
NURS 633A Health Systems Leadership Practicum III 1-3 credits

Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Track: 47 Credits (including Core)

This track prepares students to provide a holistic approach to primary care for individuals and families of all ages and to manage a wide variety of acute and chronic health problems. Family Nurse Practitioners work in independent as well as collaborative practice settings, such as private practices, urgent care centers, health maintenance organizations, clinics, health departments, student health centers, and clinics for the homeless or uninsured. The FNP core courses are offered online. Students are required to participate in one on-campus immersion during each of the four practicum courses as well as two on-campus immersions when taking the Advanced Health Assessment course (for a total of 6 on-campus immersions). These immersions are two to three days in length. Students residing in Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and Montana have at least one site visit from a clinical faculty during each practicum course. Students living outside of this four-state region are required to arrange for an additional on-campus day in conjunction with the immersion experience during each practicum course in order to complete the faculty site visit requirement. Students may only be admitted if they reside in one of these ten Western states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, or Wyoming.

Family Nurse Practitioner Core: 22 Credits
NURS 523 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 credits
NURS 524 Advanced Pharmacology 3 credits
NURS 600 Advanced Health Assessment 3 credits
NURS 601 Advanced Health Assessment: Advanced Nurse Practicum 1 credit
NURS 651P Primary Care: Gender-Based 2 credits
NURS 652P Primary Care: Infant/Child/Adolescent 3 credits
NURS 653P Primary Care: Adult/Geriatric I 4 credits
NURS 654P Primary Care: Adult/Geriatric II 3 credits
Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum: 10 Credits (600 hours)
NURS 661P Primary Care Practicum: Gender-Based 1-3 credits
NURS 662P Primary Care Practicum: Infant/Child/Adolescent 2-3 credits
NURS 663P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric I 3-4 credits
NURS 664P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric II 2-4 credits
NURS 683P Primary Care Practicum Extension (if needed) 1 credit

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Track: 47 Credits (including Core)

This track prepares students to work as Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioners. They are prepared to provide the full range of services that comprise primary mental health care in diverse settings with a variety of clients/patients, to provide clinical and professional leadership, and facilitate system improvements. Their clinical practice focuses on persons of all ages with diagnosed psychiatric disorders and individuals, families, or populations at risk for mental illness. The PMHNP core courses are offered online. When students begin their practicum courses, they are required to participate in one on-campus immersion during each of the three practicum courses and two on-campus immersions when taking the Advanced Health Assessment course (for a total of 5 on-campus immersions). These immersions are two days in length. Students will have at least one site visit from a clinical faculty during each of the three specialty practicum courses.  Additional site visits are arranged as needed. Students may only be admitted if they reside in one of these ten Western states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, or Wyoming.

Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Core: 22 Credits
NURS 523 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 credits
NURS 524 Advanced Pharmacology 3 credits
NURS 600 Advanced Health Assessment 3 credits
NURS 601 Advanced Health Assessment: Advanced Nurse Practicum 1 credit
NURS 652M Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Concepts I 3 credits
NURS 653M Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Concepts II 3 credits
NURS 654M Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Concepts III 3 credits
NURS 670 Advanced Psychopharmacolog 3 credits
Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Practicum: 10 credits (600 hours)
NURS 661M Advanced Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Practice I 1-3 credits
NURS 662M Advanced Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Practice II 1-4 credits
NURS 663M Advanced Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Practice III 1-4 credits
NURS 683M Advanced Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Practicum Extension
(if needed)
1-3 credits

Nurse Educator (NE) Track: 36 Credits (including Core) - not currently admitting to this track

This track prepares Registered Nurses to work as educators in academic, hospital, and community-based settings. Students develop an area of clinical specialization as well as competency in curriculum development, teaching-learning strategies, and assessment of student learning. Particular emphasis is placed on tailoring content and practicum experiences to individual needs. The NE core courses are offered online. Practicum experiences take place in a variety of educational settings. There are two required, on-campus immersions lasting two days each.

Nurse Educator Direct Care Core and Practicum: 8 credits
NURS 601E Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and Assessment I 3 credits
NURS 602E Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and Assessment II 3 credits
NURS 603E Advanced Clinical Practicum: Acute Care 1 credit
NURS 604E Advanced Clinical Practicum: Population-Focused 1 credit
Nurse Educator Core and Practicum: 13 Credits
NURS 651E Curriculum Development 3 credits
NURS 652E Teaching/Learning Strategies 3 credits
NURS 653E Principles of Evaluation for Nurse Educator 3 credits
Four credits distributed between the followings two courses: 4 credits
NURS 645E Nurse Educator Practicum in Clinical Setting 1-3 credits
NURS 646E Nurse Educator Practicum in Academia 1-3 credits

Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Track: 45 credits (including Core) - not currently admitting to this track

This track prepares nurse practitioners to care for young adults to frail elders. Adult/Gerontology NPs typically practice in primary care settings, such as private practices, clinics, nursing homes, and long-term care facilities. Students in this track must complete a total of 45 credits to earn an MSN degree. The didactic courses are offered online. Students complete the required 600 hours of practicum in their home communities working at a site and with a preceptor approved by faculty. When students begin their practicum courses, they are required to participate in one on-campus immersion during each of the three practicum courses as well as two on-campus immersions when taking the Advanced Health Assessment course (for a total of 5 on-campus immersions). These immersions are two or more days in length. Students residing in Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and Montana have at least one site visit from a clinical faculty during each practicum course.  Students living outside of this four-state region are required to arrange for an additional on-campus day in conjunction with the immersion experience during each practicum course in order to complete the faculty site visit requirement.

Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Core: 20 Credits
NURS 523 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 credits
NURS 524 Advanced Pharmacology 3 credits
NURS 600 Advanced Health Assessment 3 credits
NURS 601 Advanced Health Assessment: Advanced Nurse Practicum 1 credit
NURS 653P Primary Care: Adult/Geriatric I 4 credits
NURS 654P Primary Care: Adult/Geriatric II 3 credits
NURS 671 Care of the Frail Elder 3 credits
Adult/ Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Practicum: 10 Credits (600 hours)
NURS 663P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric I 3-4 credits
NURS 664P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric II 2-4 credits
NURS 665P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric III 2-3 credits
NURS 683P Primary Care Practicum Extension (if needed) 1 credit

Second Master's Degree in Nursing

After faculty review the student's transcript and determine the courses needed to complete the student's chosen specialty pathway, the student typically completes between 21 to 35 credits, depending on the track, to obtain a second master's degree in Nursing.

Admission Requirements for Second Master's Degree in Nursing Option

At the time of application to the second master’s degree option, the applicant also applies for admission to Gonzaga University. The applicant must have a master's degree in nursing from a regionally accredited college or university, be licensed as a Registered Nurse, and submit one official transcript from each college, university, and/or nursing program attended. If applying to the Family Nurse Practitioner or the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner track, the applicant must reside in one of these ten Western states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, or Wyoming.

The decision to admit an applicant to the MSN program is based on consideration of the individual's overall portfolio including:

  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better (4.0 scale).
  2. Evidence of a current unencumbered RN license.
  3. One official transcript from every college and university or nursing program attended. Only degrees and courses from a regionally accredited institution will be accepted.
  4. Current curriculum vitae (CV)
  5. Two letters of recommendation from individuals such as employers, colleagues, or professors who can attest to the applicant’s leadership, interpersonal skills, professional practice, critical thinking and judgment, and potential for advanced study. (Those applying to the FNP program are required to have a letter of recommendation from a supervisor.)
  6. Typewritten statement that describes the applicant’s:
    1. interest in the MSN Program and specific MSN track
    2. professional goals
    3. personal and professional strengths
    4. professional experiences.
  7. Non-native English speakers are required to provide proof of English proficiency. Gonzaga University accepts the following:
    1. score of 6.5 or better on the IELTS, or
    2. official TOEFL score of at least 88 ibt or 580 pbt, or
    3. completion of an Associate's degree in nursing or a diploma in Nursing from an institution where English is the primary medium of instruction.

Second Master's Degree Program Tracks:

Health Systems Leadership Track: 21-24 Credits

This track prepares Registered Nurses to assume leadership and administrative positions in inpatient, outpatient, and community-based settings. Students gain knowledge and competency in financial and human capital management, as well as strategies for responding to the ethical and legal issues encountered in administrative roles. The HSL core courses are offered online. Practicum experiences are arranged by the student to meet identified learning needs. There is a required two-day, on-campus immersion during the last practicum course.

Required Courses or Equivalency: 15-18 Credits
NURS 563 Evidence-Based Practice 3 credits
NURS 641A Nursing Leadership Development 3 credits
NURS 642A Quality and Information Management 3 credits
NURS 643A Communication and Relationship Management 3 credits
NURS 644A Health Care Management 3 credits
NURS 645A Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Healthcare Environments 3 credits
Health Systems Leadership Practicum: 6 Credits (360 hours)
NURS 631A Health Systems Leadership Practicum I 1-3 credits
NURS 632A Health Systems Leadership Practicum II 1-3 credits
NURS 633A Health Systems Leadership Practicum III 1-3 credits

Family Nurse Practitioner Track: 32-35 Credits

This track prepares students to provide a holistic approach to primary care for individuals and families of all ages and to manage a wide variety of acute and chronic health problems. Family Nurse Practitioners work in independent as well as collaborative practice settings, such as private practices, urgent care centers, health maintenance organizations, clinics, health departments, student health centers, and clinics for the homeless or uninsured. The FNP core courses are offered online. When students begin their practicum courses, they are required to participate in one on-campus immersion during each of the four specialty practicum courses as well as two on-campus immersions when taking the Advanced Health Assessment course (for a total of 6 immersions). These immersions are two days or more in length. Students residing in Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and Montana have at least one site visit from a clinical faculty during each practicum course.  Students living outside of this four-state region are required to arrange for an additional on-campus day in conjunction with the immersion during each practicum course in order to complete the faculty site visit requirement.

Required Courses or Equivalency: 22-25 Credits
NURS 523 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 credits
NURS 524 Advanced Pharmacology 3 credits
NURS 563 Evidence-Based Practice (if needed) 3 credits
NURS 600 Advanced Health Assessment 3 credits
NURS 601 Advanced Health Assessment: Advanced Nurse Practicum 1 credit
NURS 651P Primary Care: Gender-Based 2 credits
NURS 652P Primary Care: Infant/Child/Adolescent 3 credits
NURS 653P Primary Care: Adult/Geriatric I 4 credits
NURS 654P Primary Care: Adult/Geriatric II 3 credits
Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum: 10 Credits (600 hours)
NURS 661P Primary Care Practicum: Gender-Based 1-3 credits
NURS 662P Primary Care Practicum: Infant/Child/Adolescent 2-3 credits
NURS 663P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric I 3-4 credits
NURS 664P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric II 2-4 credits
NURS 683P Primary Care Practicum Extension (if needed) 1 credit

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Track: 32-35 Credits

This track prepares students to work as Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioners. They are prepared to provide the full range of services that comprise primary mental health care in diverse settings with a variety of clients/patients, to provide clinical and professional leadership, and facilitate system improvements. Their clinical practice focuses on persons of all ages with diagnosed psychiatric disorders and individuals, families, or populations at risk for mental illness. The PMHNP core courses are offered online. When students begin their practicum courses, they are required to participate in one on-campus immersion during each of the three specialty practicum courses and two on-campus immersions when taking the Advanced Health Assessment course (for a total of 5 immersions). These immersions are two days in length. Students will have at least one site visit from a clinical faculty during each of the three practicum courses.  Additional site visits are arranged as needed.

Required Courses or Equivalency: 22-25 Credits
NURS 523 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 credits
NURS 524 Advanced Pharmacology 3 credits
NURS 563 Evidence-Based Practice (if needed) 3 credits
NURS 600 Advanced Health Assessment 3 credits
NURS 601 Advanced Health Assessment: Advanced Nurse Practicum 1 credit
NURS 652M Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Concepts I 3 credits
NURS 653M Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Concepts II 3 credits
NURS 654M Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Concepts III 3 credits
NURS 670  Advanced Psychopharmacology   3 credits 
Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Practicum: 10 Credits (600 hours)
NURS 661M Advanced Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Practice I 1-3 credits
NURS 662M Advanced Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Practice II 1-4 credits
NURS 663M Advanced Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Practice III 1-4 credits
NURS 683M Advanced Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Practicum Extension
(if needed)
1-3 credits

Nurse Educator Track: 21-24 Credits - not currently admitting to this track

This track prepares Registered Nurses to work as educators in academic, hospital, and community-based settings. Students develop an area of clinical specialization as well as competency in curriculum development, teaching-learning strategies, and assessment of student learning. Particular emphasis is placed on tailoring content and practicum experiences to individual needs. The NE core courses are offered online. Practicum experiences take place in a variety of educational settings. There are two required 2-day, on-campus immersions.

Required Courses or Equivalency: 17-20 Credits
NURS 563 Evidence-Based Practice 3 credits
NURS 601E Pathophysiology, Pharmacology and Assessment I 3 credits
NURS 602E Pathophysiology, Pharmacology and Assessment II 3 credits
NURS 603E Advanced Clinical Practicum: Acute Care 1 credit
NURS 604E Advanced Clinical Practicum: Population Focused 1 credit
NURS 651E Curriculum Development 3 credits
NURS 652E Teaching Learning Strategies 3 credits
NURS 653E Principles of Evaluation for Nurse Educator 3 credits
Nurse Educator Practicum: 4 credits distributed between the following two
practicum courses (240) hours):
NURS 645E Nurse Educator Practicum in Clinical Setting 1-3 credits
NURS 646E Nurse Educator Practicum in Academia 1-3 credits


Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Track: 20-33 credits - not currently admitting to this track

This track prepares nurse practitioners to care for young adults to frail elders. Adult/Gerontology NPs typically practice in primary care settings, such as private practices, clinics, nursing homes, and long-term care facilities. The AGNP core courses are offered online. When students begin their practicum courses, they are required to participate in one on-campus immersion during each of the three specialty practicum courses as well as two on-campus immersions when taking the Advanced Health Assessment course (for a total of 5 immersions). These immersions are two to three days in length. Students residing in Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and Montana also have at least one site visit from a clinical faculty during each practicum course.  Students living outside of this four-state region are required to arrange for an additional on-campus day in conjunction with the immersion during each practicum course in order to complete the faculty site visit requirement.

Required Courses or Equivalency: 10-23 Credits
NURS 523 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 credits
NURS 524 Advanced Pharmacology 3 credits
NURS 563 Evidence Based Practice 3 credits
NURS 600 Advanced Health Assessment 3 credits
NURS 601 Advanced Health Assessment: Advanced Nurse Practicum 1 credit
NURS 653P Primary Care: Adult/Geriatric I 4 credits
NURS 654P Primary Care: Adult/Geriatric II 3 credits
NURS 671 Care of the Frail Elder 3 credits
Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Practicum: 10 Credits (600 hours)
NURS 663P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric I 3-4 credits
NURS 664P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric II 2-4 credits
NURS 665P Primary Care Practicum: Adult/Geriatric III 2-3 credits
NURS 683P Primary Care Practicum Extension (if needed) 1 credit
NURS 523 Adv Pathophysiology
3.00 credits
This course seeks to assist learners to understand the cellular pathophysiological basis of disease. The content emphasizes cellular, genetic, and biochemical processes. Pathophysiological and physiological concepts form the basis for critical thinking and decision making when assessing and treating individuals with various disease processes.
NURS 524 Adv Pharmacology
3.00 credits
The course is designed to prepare the learner for an advanced practice role with prescriptive authority. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles will be applied to the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of disease. Medications will be studied according to therapeutic categories and drug classes within the framework of organ-based pathophysiologic disease state processes. Emphasis will be placed on the medications that are commonly used (top 200 drugs) in primary care settings with special attention given to evidence-based medication selection, patient education, and medication monitoring.
Prerequisite:
NURS 523 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 561 Info Tech & Data Mgmt
3.00 credits
This course explores the many uses of information technology and data management. The course will provide learners with the knowledge and skills in information and healthcare technology needed to enhance communication and interprofessional collaboration in the current healthcare environment. The process of locating, accessing and analyzing information and data is applied to advanced practice roles, enhancing patient safety, quality and outcomes, and improving population health.
NURS 562 Theor Fdn Hlthcare Improvement
3.00 credits
This course provides a theoretical orientation to become change agents in a variety of healthcare settings and diverse practice populations. The course will provide learners with a foundation in theories significant to nursing practice such as complex adaptive systems, organizational and change theory, leadership and team-building models, and quality improvement and care models needed to assess, design, plan, implement, and evaluation quality improvement project to promote patient-centered care and improve program outcomes.
NURS 563 EBP for Quality & Safety
3.00 credits
This course will provide learners with a theoretical and practical foundation for identifying and critically appraising evidence from qualitative and quantitative research traditions. The emphasis is on the examination of the essential elements of evidence-based-practice, including the formulation of answerable questions to address quality improvement and safety in a variety of advance practice roles and the systematic search for research evidence that can be used to answer researchable questions.
NURS 564 Contemp Hlthcare Env
3.00 credits
This course explores the ethical and legal principles of healthcare and their impact on accessible, affordable, and quality care. This course will provide learners with a framework for discussing ethical and legal issues with an emphasis on the ethical delivery of care to individuals, families and populations. The scope and standards of advanced nursing roles will be examined along with current issues and policies that address health care disparities, health care organizations, financing and quality. Strategies for analyzing and influencing public, professional and institutional policies related to health care and its delivery will be considered.
NURS 565 Clin Prev for Diverse Pops
3.00 credits
The focus of this course is on the development of health promotion and disease prevention programs for diverse groups and populations. Selected concepts of epidemiology, broad determinants of health, population health, clinical prevention and cultural competence will be examined as they relate to the design and delivery of equitable clinical prevention and health promotion interventions and/or services to individuals, families, communities and aggregates/clinical populations.
NURS 600 Advanced Health Assessment
3.00 credits
This course is designed to extend and refine the assessment skills of the Registered Nurse in preparation for an advanced clinical practice role. The student will learn to perform physical, developmental, mental, emotional, cultural, social, and family assessments. Students will review anatomy and physiology related to each biological system being studied. The course emphasizes in-depth techniques for assessing each body system in individuals throughout the life span. Lectures will focus on the use of a variety of health assessment techniques, including history taking skills, physical assessment, and other diagnostic assessment tools. Application of diagnostic reasoning and patient education to the assessment process will be included in the content. This course incorporates approximately 13 hours of supervised laboratory experience and 60 hours of precepted clinical experience. Laboratory and clinical components of the course focus on helping the student to develop communication, observation, and psychomotor skills and to document history and physical examination findings. Two, 2-day on-campus immersions required.
Prerequisite:
NURS 523 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 524 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 601
NURS 601 Adv Health Assessment Pract I
1.00 credit
This course is the practicum course paired with NURS 600 Advanced Health Assessment. The focus is on the practice of advanced assessment skills within a primary care setting. Students must complete 60 clinical hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner or physician.
Prerequisite:
NURS 523 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 524 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 600
NURS 601E Patho, Pharm & Asmt I
3.00 credits
This course provides students with an in-depth analysis of concept-based pathophysiological problems with emphasis on assisting learners in understanding the cellular pathophysiological basis of disease, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics principles of its pharmacological treatment and the refinement of physical assessment skills used to form the basis for critical thinking and decision-making when treating individuals with various pathophysiological problems.
NURS 602E Patho, Pharm & Asmt II
3.00 credits
This course is a continuation of NURS 601E and provides students with an in-depth analysis of concept-based pathophysiological problems with emphasis on assisting learners in understanding the cellular pathophysiological basis of disease, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics principles of its pharmacological treatment and the refinement of physical assessment skills used to form the basis for critical thinking and decision-making when treating individuals with various pathophysiological problems.
NURS 603E Adv Clin Prct: Acute Care
1.00 credit
Students complete 60 hours of direct care activities with a master’s prepared nurse in an acute care setting. Particular emphasis is placed on safety, quality of care, and quality improvement activities. Students are provided with the opportunity to integrate previous knowledge and develop proficiency in a focused area of acute care clinical nursing.
Prerequisite:
NURS 602E Minimum Grade: C or NURS 601E Minimum Grade: C
NURS 604E Adv Clin Prct: Pop-Focused
1.00 credit
Students complete 60 hours of direct care activities with a master’s prepared nurse in a community setting. Particular emphasis is placed on safety, quality of care, and quality improvement activities. Students are provided with the opportunity to integrate previous knowledge and develop proficiency in a population-focused area of clinical nursing.
Prerequisite:
NURS 565 Minimum Grade: C and (NURS 601E Minimum Grade: C or NURS 602E Minimum Grade: C)
NURS 631A Hlth Syst Leader Practicum I
1.00- 3.00 credits
This practicum integrates knowledge from the didactic courses in the health organization setting.
NURS 632A Health Systems Leader Prac II
1.00- 3.00 credits
This practicum integrates knowledge from the didactic courses in the health organization setting.
Prerequisite:
NURS 631A Minimum Grade: C
NURS 633A Health System Leader Pract III
1.00- 3.00 credits
This practicum integrates knowledge from the didactic courses in the health organization setting.
Prerequisite:
NURS 632A Minimum Grade: C
NURS 634A Nursing Leadership Practicum
2.00- 3.00 credits
This practicum course prepares nurses as healthcare leaders with the opportunity to integrate leadership and theoretical knowledge from previous didactic courses to gain hands-on expertise. Students have the opportunity to achieve competencies as nurse leaders in the areas of communication, knowledge of the healthcare environment, leadership, professionalism, and business skills, as outlined by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE). This individualized practicum experience will take place in one or more pre-approved healthcare settings under the guidance of an approved expert clinical preceptor for the completion of 120-180 clinical practicum hours. Students will develop objectives for learning and identify specific activities to meet these objectives; one objective will focus on a practicum project. Students are required to attend a two-day on-campus immersion.
Prerequisite:
NURS 645A Minimum Grade: C
NURS 642A Quality & Information Manage
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the information management skills essential for effective nursing leadership in complex healthcare settings. Topics to be addressed include clinical information systems, benchmarking, and quality monitoring.
NURS 643A Communication & Relation Manag
3.00 credits
This course addresses the role of the nurse as a healthcare systems leader in developing and sustaining relationships with employees and other healthcare providers within complex healthcare environments. Course content will address communication strategies, relationship management, conflict management and negotiation skills, and evaluation. Concepts related to legal, regulatory, and ethical aspects of employee hiring, performance evaluation, and termination will be reviewed. Consideration will be given to succession management.
NURS 644A Health Care Management
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the financial management skills essential for effective nursing leadership in complex healthcare settings. Topics to be addressed include financing, administrative, financial, cost accounting systems, and budget development and oversight.
Prerequisite:
NURS 561 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 562 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 563 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 564 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 565 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 645A Legal, Regulatory, & Ethic HC
3.00 credits
This course addresses the role of the nurse as a health systems leader in relation to legal, regulatory, and ethical considerations in health care environments. Complex adaptive systems is used as the framework for examining legal and regulatory constraints that affect care delivery, patient and employee rights and responsibilities, and quality management, including patient safety and risk management. Tension between legal and ethical guidelines will be explored.
NURS 645E NE Pract in Clinical Setting
1.00- 3.00 credits
Students complete 60-180 of the required 240 hours of preceptored teaching experience in an approved clinical setting providing student, patient and/or staff education. The experience will include classroom teaching, as well as supervised evaluation of participant learning and performance. The course included on-line clinical conferences.
Prerequisite:
NURS 601E Minimum Grade: C and NURS 602E Minimum Grade: C and NURS 651E Minimum Grade: C
NURS 646E NE Pract in Academia
1.00- 3.00 credits
Students complete 60-180 of the required 240 hours of preceptored teaching experience in approved academic setting. The experience will include classroom and clinical teaching, as well as supervised evaluation of student work and performance. The course includes on-line clinical conferences. There is a two to three day on-campus capstone immersion focusing on issues of professional development, transition to the nurse educator role, and legal and ethical issues inherent in academic and service settings.
Prerequisite:
NURS 601E Minimum Grade: C and NURS 602 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 651E Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 653E
NURS 651E Curriculum Development
3.00 credits
This course addresses strategies for developing curricula, ranging in scope from individual teaching sessions, to courses, to complete programs of study. Emphasis is given to developing a curriculum that is congruent with institutional and program mission, philosophy, and goals; professional standards; needs and expectations of an educational program’s communities of interest; contextual variables; and learner characteristics. Students are introduced to "backward design" principles, the concept of "threading" content, strategies for sequencing content, using a theoretical/conceptual framework to inform a curriculum, and principles of curriculum evaluation, focusing on both content validity and outcomes achievement. Legal, ethical, and accreditation issues related to curriculum content also will be considered.
NURS 651P PC: Gender Based
2.00 credits
This course focuses on the role of the Family Nurse Practitioner in the care of women and men with common pathophysiological alterations in gender related health. Focus is on clinical management of preventative, acute and chronic health problems in women and men who present for care in primary care settings. Emphasis is placed on the FNP’s role in performing comprehensive health assessment (including ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic tests), diagnostic reasoning (differential diagnosis), and prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacological interventions.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 652P Minimum Grade: C and NURS 662P Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 661P
NURS 652E Teaching/learning Strategies
3.00 credits
This course explores strategies for teaching in classroom, online, clinical and community settings and emphasizes linking teaching-learning strategies to desired learning outcomes. Theoretical frameworks for teaching-learning, assessing and accommodating learning styles, preferences, and readiness to learn will be considered. The course also addresses adapting content to teaching strategies for different groups of learners (e.g., students, health care consumer/patients, professional colleagues) and learners with different characteristics. A two to three day on-campus immersion focusing on simulation technologies is required. The course will explore strategies to enhance interprofessional collaboration through the educational process. Students will use their clinical specialty area as context for course assignments.
Prerequisite:
NURS 651E Minimum Grade: C
NURS 652M PMH Nurse Concepts I
3.00 credits
Designed as an induction into advanced practice psychiatric-mental health nursing. The scope of practice and standards of the psychiatric nurse practitioner are analyzed. Major emphasis is placed on building a therapeutic relationship, assessing, and diagnosing major psychiatric disorders mental health promotion/prevention strategies, and diagnostic decision-making is stressed. Risk assessments and formulating diagnoses using DSM V, are emphasized and other phenomena requiring clinical intervention, considering variations across the lifespan. Selected theories of interpersonal psychotherapy, human development, recovery, and trauma informed care across the lifespan are analyzed. The biological bases of psychosocial behavior and their implications in psychiatric care are explored. Integration of concepts and application in one's personal practice are stressed.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 670 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 661M
NURS 652P PC: Infant, Child, Adolescence
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the role of the Family Nurse Practitioner in the clinical management of preventative, acute and chronic health problems in infants/children/adolescents who present for care in primary care settings. Emphasis is placed on the NP’s role in performing comprehensive health assessment and treatment (including ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic tests), diagnostic reasoning (differential diagnosis), and prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacological interventions. The FNP’s role in management and referral to other health care professionals and community resources for individuals and families will be emphasized (e.g., coordination of care transitions within and between health care systems for children with developmental delay).
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 662P
NURS 653E Principles of Eval for NE
3.00 credits
This course examines the basic principles of evaluation and provides practical guidelines for evaluation of learning in academic, clinical and community settings. The course includes content on test construction and evaluation, developing and using rubrics, developing and grading written assignments, evaluating clinical performance, and evaluating personal teaching effectiveness. The course also addresses program evaluation and accreditation. Legal and ethical considerations related to evaluation and grading will be discussed. (One day test writing seminar included in the NURS 646E on-campus capstone immersion.)
Prerequisite:
NURS 651E Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 646E
NURS 653M PMH Nurse Concepts II
3.00 credits
The focus of this course is on the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic mental health issues. Emphasis is on individual and group psychotherapy across the lifespan. Development of therapeutic relationships and interpersonal processes in psychotherapy are examined. Continued development of therapeutic relationships, self-awareness, and skill in assessment, diagnosis, and care formulation are emphasized.
Prerequisite:
NURS 652M Minimum Grade: C or NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 662M
NURS 653P PC: Adult/Geriatric I
4.00 credits
This course focuses on the role of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) in the clinical management of chronic and complex health problems in adults and elders who present for care in primary care settings. Emphasis is placed on the NP’s role in performing comprehensive health assessment (including ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic tests), diagnostic reasoning (differential diagnosis) and treatment, prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacological interventions, and patient education, follow-up, co-management or referral.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 663P
NURS 654M PMH Nurse Concepts III
3.00 credits
Focuses on the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic mental health issues. The course will have an emphasis on individual, group and family psychotherapy interventions. Development of therapeutic relationships and interpersonal processes in psychotherapy are examined. Theoretical models for individual and group psychotherapy are analyzed for their application and presenting issues in therapy situations of patients/clients of varying ages and diagnoses are emphasized. Self-awareness; continuing development of knowledge and skill in assessment, diagnosis, and care formulation; and integration of theories and techniques of psychotherapy for application in one's personal practice are stressed. Strategies in treating chronic mental health disorders are considered. The indications for and selection of appropriate theoretical models, diagnostic strategies, and/or intervention techniques, and issues in treatment situations of patients/clients across the age span are emphasized.
Prerequisite:
NURS 652M Minimum Grade: C or NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 663M
NURS 654P PC: Adult/Geriatric II
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the role of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) in the clinical management of chronic and complex health problems in adults and elders who present for care in primary care and other settings. Emphasis is placed on comprehensive health assessment and treatment (including ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic tests), diagnostic reasoning (differential diagnosis), prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacological interventions, and patient education. The course also emphasizes the NP’s role when referring to other health care professionals, community resources, and interdisciplinary teams.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 653P Minimum Grade: C and NURS 663P Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 664P
NURS 661M Psyc-Mntl Hlth Practicum I
1.00- 3.00 credits
This clinical course is paired with the didactic course Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Concepts I. Emphasis is on utilizing the theories, concepts, and skills necessary to assess and diagnose acute and chronic psychiatric disorders and the development of clinical intervention.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 652M
NURS 661P PC: Gender-Based Practicum
1.00- 3.00 credits
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Primary Care Gender-Based. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing. Students must complete 60 to 180 clinical clock hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either an MD or a NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the development of skills in caring for the adult male and female population with health concerns.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 652P Minimum Grade: C and NURS 662P Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 651P
NURS 662M Psyc-Mntl Hlth Practicum II
1.00- 4.00 credits
This clinical course is paired with the didactic course Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Concepts II. Emphasis is on the application of treatment interventions including medication management, individual, group psychotherapy for the adult clients.
Prerequisite:
NURS 652M Minimum Grade: C or NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 653M
NURS 662P PC:Inf,Child,Adol Pract
2.00- 3.00 credits
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Primary Care Infant, Child and Adolescent. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing. Students must complete 120 clinical clock hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either an MD or a NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the development of skills in caring for the population of infant through adolescent with health concerns.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 652P
NURS 663M Psyc-Mntl Hlth Practicum III
1.00- 4.00 credits
This clinical course is paired with the didactic course Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Concepts III. Emphasis is on the application of treatment interventions including medication management and individual and group psychotherapy for the child/adolescent and elderly client with acute, chronic, and co-occurring disorders.
Prerequisite:
NURS 652M Minimum Grade: C and NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 654M
NURS 663P PC:Adult/Geriatric Pract I
3.00- 4.00 credits
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Primary Care Adult/Geriatric I. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing. Students must complete a minimum of 180 clinical clock hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either a physician or NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the development of skills in caring for the adult/geriatric population with health concerns in primary care settings.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 653P
NURS 664P PC:Adult/Geriatric Pract II
2.00- 4.00 credits
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Primary Care Adult/Geriatric II. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing. Students must complete a minimum 120 clinical clock hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either a physician or NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the development of skills in caring for the adult/geriatric population with health concerns in primary care and other settings.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 653P Minimum Grade: C and NURS 663P Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 654P
NURS 665P PC:Adult/Geriatric Pract III
2.00- 3.00 credits
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Care of the Frail Elder. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing in a long-term care setting while caring for frail older adults. Students must complete a minimum of 120 clinical clock hours (2 credits) in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either a physician or NP).
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 671
NURS 670 Psychopharmacology
3.00 credits
The course covers the principles and theories of psychopharmacology, the examination of, epigenetics, genetics, neurochemical communication, circuits in psychopharmacology, the effects of various psychotropic drugs, and the actions of drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders. The course examines the actions and use of specific psychotropic medication, required monitoring and the management of behavior and mental illness.
Prerequisite:
NURS 523 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 524 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 671 Care of Frail Elder
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the clinical management of the elder in primary care. Emphasis is on principles of gerontological care, common syndromes, ethical issues, abuse/neglect, and care options within the long-term care (LTC) continuum. The course includes a clinical application experience in an internal medicine clinic or a LTC setting.
Prerequisite:
NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 665P
NURS 672 Mental Hlth in Adv Practice
3.00 credits
This course is foundational for advanced practice nurses when providing care to patients with common mental health disorders. Content includes neurophysiologic, genomic, environmental, social, and developmental theories to understand the etiology and presentation of common mental health conditions. Psychopharmacological and non-pharmacological principles and modalities for treatment of common mental health problems will be explored.
NURS 683A Nursing Ldrshp Practicum Ext
1.00- 2.00 credits
This course provides Nursing Leadership in Healthcare students the opportunity to continue to apply nursing leadership and healthcare management concepts while completing required practicum hours. Students will complete 1-2 credits of practicum (60-120 hours) in approved clinical settings while supervised by approved clinical preceptors.
NURS 683M Psyc-Mntl Hlth Pract Extension
1.00- 3.00 credits
This course is an independent clinical course. It is not paired with a didactic course. It is designed to allow Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner students to continue to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing in semesters when they are not enrolled in NP specialty didactic courses. Students will complete variable clinical clock hours in approved clinical settings while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either a physician or NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the continuing development and refinement of treatment interventions including medication management and individual and group psychotherapy for any population.
Prerequisite:
NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
NURS 683P Prim Care Pract Extension
1.00 credit
This course is an independent clinical course. It is not paired with a didactic course. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to continue to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing in semesters following completion of the NP specialty didactic courses. Students will complete variable clinical clock hours in approved clinical settings while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either an MD or a NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the continuing development and refinement of skills in caring for any population with health concerns in primary care or other approved settings.
Prerequisite:
NURS 663P Minimum Grade: C and NURS 662P Minimum Grade: C and (NURS 654P Minimum Grade: C or NURS 651P Minimum Grade: C)
NURS 690 Special Topics
1.00- 4.00 credits
Courses designed to address special topics in nursing, based on student and faculty interests.
NURS 691 Special Topics
1.00- 3.00 credits
Topic to be determined by instructor.
NURS 692 Independent Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Independent study requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB. (Cannot be used to fulfill elective requirement).
NURS 700 Theoretical Fdtn of Nrs Pract
3.00 credits
This course focuses on examining philosophical and scientific knowledge development in nursing practice and the implications for practice. Emphasis will be on the analysis, critique, and application of nursing middle-range and other related theories to nursing practice.
Prerequisite:
NURS 563 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 701 DNP Pract I: Appl of EBP
1.00- 3.00 credits
This practicum course provides the student an opportunity to work within a practice setting to begin to design his or her scholarly project. The student also begins to establish the expanded advanced nursing DNP role focusing on a population of interest. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience.
Concurrent:
NURS 761
NURS 702 DNP Pract II: Appl of EBP
1.00- 3.00 credits
The DNP student works with a faculty mentor to begin implementation of his or her scholarly project. The student also establishes the expanded advanced nursing DNP role focusing on a population of interest. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience.
Prerequisite:
NURS 701 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 761 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 762
NURS 703 DNP Pract III: Appl of EBP
1.00- 3.00 credits
The DNP student continues to work with a faculty mentor to implement his or her scholarly project. This includes analysis of data and drafting a report of the scholarly project. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience.
Prerequisite:
NURS 702 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 762 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 763
NURS 704 DNP Pract IV: Appl of EBP
1.00- 3.00 credits
In this final practicum course, the DNP student completes the implementation and evaluation of his or her scholarly project. The student also completes the final written report of the project and disseminates the findings through preparation of a bound document or a manuscript suitable for a peer-reviewed publication along with an abstract that is submitted for a podium or poster presentation at a major conference. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience.
Prerequisite:
NURS 763 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 703 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 764
NURS 705 Introduction to the DNP Role
1.00 credit
This course serves as the orientation to the DNP role. The Gonzaga mission, along with Jesuit values and principles are discovered and experienced. The DNP project is described and potential projects are delineated. Available resources are identified and explored.
Concurrent:
NURS 711
NURS 708 Inferential Statistics
3.00 credits
The purpose of this course is to review statistical concepts, such as descriptive statistics, probability distributions (binomial and normal), sampling distributions, inferences (point estimates and confidence intervals), hypotheses testing (one-sample tests, two-sample tests), Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), as well as simple linear regression and multiple regression analysis. The course emphasizes the application of statistical concepts to analyze research for best available evidence to support quality nursing practice. The course also provides students with hands-on experience in using statistical software (Mega Stat) to assist in making effective decisions.
NURS 710 Population-Focused Care
3.00 credits
This course focuses on developing and evaluating health promotion and disease prevention interventions targeting population-based health. The environmental, socioeconomic, and cultural context of health behaviors will be explored. The use of epidemiology and evidence-based research to inform clinical prevention programs and policy solutions for population health disparities are emphasized.
NURS 711 Qual Imprmnt & Ldrshp in HC
3.00 credits
This course emphasizes quality improvement and leadership in healthcare. It acquaints students with the processes, tools, and techniques that will enable them to develop the foundational framework for the DNP project. The course focuses on leadership knowledge, abilities, and skills in a complex adaptive health arena, emphasizing continuous process improvement as crucial to achieving high quality outcomes.
Concurrent:
NURS 705
NURS 712 Translational Rsrch Adv Pract
3.00 credits
This course will address the DNP role in translational research with emphasis on the examination of knowledge transformation. The course includes conducting a systematic search for research evidence to answer researchable questions and the synthesis of evidence for knowledge translation across a body of research in both qualitative and quantitative traditions.
NURS 713 Population Health Outcomes
3.00 credits
This course will explore utilization of information technology and data management for measuring and attaining population health outcomes. The DNP student will be prepared to use epidemiological data to identify the causes of disease and to evaluate health services for quality, safety and efficacy.
NURS 714 Theortcl Underpinning Adv Prct
3.00 credits
This course provides an overview of both general theoretical knowledge and specific theoretical perspectives. The emphasis is on the application of frameworks for advanced nursing roles such as nurse clinician and leader. This course particularly emphasizes selecting, analyzing, and applying nursing and integrative middle-range theories to efforts to improve population health and health care delivery.
NURS 715 Hlth Policy, Ethics & Advocacy
3.00 credits
This course emphasizes the leadership role of the DNP in influencing health policy makers and health policy development, emphasizing inter-professional collaboration. The effect of nursing scholarship on health policy and advocacy will be explored. The regulatory and ethical environments that impact DNP practice are examined considering social justice arid lgnatian values. Strategies for designing and leading the implementation of public, professional, and institutional policies relating to local, regional, national, and international health care and its delivery are considered.
Prerequisite:
NURS 705 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 711 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 712 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 720 Evidence Synth for Practice
3.00 credits
This course emphasizes how to create answerable questions to address specific patient/client problems or situations and critically appraise types of data generated through research in both qualitative and quantitative traditions. The focus is on evaluating the adequacy of research questions, methodologies, and the presentation of findings. The DNP will be prepared to use epidemiological data to identify the causes of disease and to evaluate health services. In addition, the course emphasizes an examination of knowledge transformation, including the systematic search for research evidence to answer research questions and the synthesis of evidence for knowledge translation across a body of research.
NURS 730 Clin Prog Dev, Impl, & Eval
3.00 credits
This course emphasizes the steps involved in the development of a business plan for creation of a new clinical service or program or a clinical practice. Students will learn about conducting a needs assessment, developing mission and values statements, creating the program design, conducting a financial analysis, and designing evaluation strategies and measures.
NURS 740 Qual Impr, Inf Mgt, & Ld in HC
3.00 credits
This course emphasizes strategic planning and management, systems and organizational theories, quality improvement, and information management. It acquaints students with the process, tools and techniques of strategic planning that will enable them to manage patient populations and to contribute effectively to strategic thinking and action in health systems. The course focuses on leadership and the process of health care delivery from a systems perspective, emphasizing continuous process improvement as crucial to achieving high quality outcomes.
NURS 750 Health Policy & Advocacy
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the leadership role of the DNP in influencing health policy makers and health policy development emphasizing interprofessional collaboration. The effect of nursing scholarship on health policy and advocacy will be explored. The regulatory and ethical environments that impact DNP practice are examined considering Ignatian values and social justice principles. Strategies for designing and leading the implementation of public, professional, and institutional polices relating to local, regional, national, and international health care and its delivery are considered.
NURS 760 DNP Project Readiness
3.00 credits
This course will serve as the vehicle to ensure readiness for beginning the DNP project arid practicum courses.
NURS 761 Integr Appl of Evid Sem I
2.00 credits
This is the first of a series of four seminars that provide the DNP student with mentored opportunities to identify a practice issue and develop, implement, evaluate, and disseminate an independent, analytic, scholarly project focusing on problems of advanced nursing practice within specific populations. Each seminar course builds on the knowledge and practice expertise of the DNP student, culminating in the completion of a scholarly project. The range of projects will be varied as they relate to the DNP student's unique area of nursing, e.g., quality improvement, analyzing policy, designing and using databases, designing and evaluating new models of care, collaboration with researchers to answer clinical questions, program development, implementation, and evaluation.
Concurrent:
NURS 701
NURS 762 Integr Appl of Evid Sem II
2.00 credits
The DNP student refines the design of his or her scholarly project, including the data collection and evaluation plans. Students must successfully complete an oral defense of the planned project prior to beginning implementation.
Prerequisite:
NURS 701 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 761 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 702
NURS 763 Integr Appl of Evid Sem III
1.00 credit
The DNP student continues to refine the evidence-based scholarly project specific to a population of interest within a practice setting.
Prerequisite:
NURS 702 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 762 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 703
NURS 764 Integr Appl of Evid Sem IV
1.00 credit
In this final seminar course, the student will present the final defense of his or her scholarly project through an oral presentation that addresses the topic of interest, the development and implementation of the project, how it addressed the needs of a selected population, and an evaluation of the project and outcomes. Students will apply knowledge and skills obtained in the didactic and integrative courses to address the ethical, legal, financial and organizational aspects of the scholarly project.
Prerequisite:
NURS 703 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 763 Minimum Grade: C
Concurrent:
NURS 704
NURS 790 Special Topics
1.00- 4.00 credits
Courses designed to address special topics in nursing, based on student and faculty interests.
NURS 792 Independent Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Independent study requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB. (Cannot be used to fulfill elective requirement).
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.