Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice

Chairperson: Scot Pettey, DNAP, CRNA, ARNP
Program Director: Scot Pettey, DNAP, CRNA, ARNP
Assistant Program Director: Brad Hemingway, DNAP, CRNA, ARNP
Clinical Director: John Weisbrod, MAE, CRNA, ARNP

Introduction

The Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice (DNAP) Program is designed for the registered nurse who wishes to assume a leadership role within the profession of nurse anesthesia. In addition to preparing students to be competent, skilled nurse anesthesia practitioners, it is the mission of the program to nurture and develop innovative, creative leaders for the advancement of the profession. The DNAP degree is a practice doctorate that provides DNAP students with robust clinical experiences gained through completing over 2800 clinical hours during the program. The Nurse Anesthesia Program is an integrated program; the first semester is primarily didactic, with clinical rotations beginning in the second semester.

Graduates of Gonzaga's DNAP program receive an evidence-based experience blending clinical anesthesia practice with leadership strategies. The curriculum of Gonzaga’s DNAP program builds on the extensive education of program participants. In addition to learning the practice of nurse anesthesia, candidates learn to engage in systems thinking to solve complex problems, translate evidence to improve health care practices and population health, lead quality improvement and change initiatives, and demonstrate effective intraprofessional collaboration in the nurse anesthesia field.

The DNAP Program is jointly owned and operated by Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center (dba Providence Health Care) and Gonzaga University.  In addition to having clinical rotations at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center and Children’s Hospital, students also have clinical experiences at Providence Holy Family Hospital, Providence Mount Carmel Hospital, Providence Regional Medical Center-Everett Colby Campus, Providence Regional Medical Center- Everett Pacific Campus, Mann-Grandstaff Veteran's Medical Center, Pullman Regional Hospital, Anaconda Community Hospital, Pleasant View Surgery Center, Kootenai Health, and Inland Northwest Anesthesia and Pain.

Admission Requirements:

  1. A current unencumbered, unrestricted license as a registered professional nurse and/or an APRN/ARNP in the United States or its territories or protectorates and ability to obtain a Washington State and Idaho State RN license.

  2. A baccalaureate or graduate degree in nursing or an appropriate major from an accredited university.

  3. Seven (7) life science courses. Some examples include, but are not limited to: chemistry, biochemistry, biology, microbiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and anatomy.

  4. Two years of RN experience with a minimum of one year full-time work experience, or its part-time equivalent, as a registered nurse in a critical care setting at the time of the application deadline. The best critical care experience is obtained in a busy ICU, CICU, MICU, or SICU.  The competencies desired are routine management of adult patients on ventilators, interpretation of advanced monitoring, and titration of vasoactive medications. Critical care experience must be within the past 3 years.

    The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Education Programs (COA) defines critical care experience as: 

     "Critical care experience must be obtained in a critical care area within the United States, its territories or a US military hospital outside of the United States. During this experience, the registered professional nurse has developed critical decision making and psychomotor skills, competency in patient assessment, and the ability to use and interpret advanced monitoring techniques. A critical care area is defined as one where, on a routine basis, the registered professional nurse manages one or more of the following: invasive hemodynamic monitors (e.g., pulmonary artery, central venous pressure, and arterial catheters), cardiac assist devices, mechanical ventilation, and vasoactive infusions. Examples of critical care units may include but are not limited to: surgical intensive care, cardiothoracic intensive care, coronary intensive care, medical intensive care, pediatric intensive care, and neonatal intensive care."

  5. 3.0 minimum (3.2 preferred) overall grade point average with strong science grades.

  6. CCRN certification is required and documentation is submitted as part of the application.

  7. Recommended minimum 24 hours cumulative shadowing time with an anesthesia provider.  (Submission of a document listing contact information of anesthesia provider(s) with whom the applicant shadowed, including the date, location, and total number of hours will be included with the application.)

Personal interviews with members of the admissions committee by invitation only.

Application Requirements:

  1. Documentation of an earned bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.

  2. One official transcript from every college, university and nursing school attended.

  3. Three letters of recommendation are required
    a.    One recommendation must be from applicant’s immediate supervisor who is able to evaluate professional practice, leadership, interpersonal skills, communication, critical thinking and judgment.
    b.    The other two recommendations should be from professional colleagues who can evaluate the applicant’s professional practice, leadership, interpersonal skills, communication, critical thinking and judgment.

  4. Evidence of current Registered Nurse license.

  5. Current professional curriculum vitae/resume.

  6. Evidence of CCRN Certification 

  7. Typewritten statement describing: (1-2 pages, double spaced)
    a. Interest in Gonzaga’s DNAP program and what he/she hopes to gain from the degree.
    b. Understanding of a nurse anesthetist's role in healthcare.
    c. Reasons for pursuing a career as a nurse anesthetist and how your professional experiences have prepared you for the DNAP program.
    d. Description of what evidence based practice means to you.

  8. $50 Application Fee
  9. The last day to submit a complete application for the DNAP program is September 1st with classes beginning the following May.

Program Expectations:

  • Attendance is required in all clinical and didactic courses. 
  • Hours of Duty
    Didactic classes may be scheduled between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Evening classes or seminars are occasionally held.  After the first semester, clinical duty begins at 6:00 a.m. During the second and third years of the program, students rotate to 3p-11p, 7a-7p, 7p-7a, as well as Saturday and Sunday 12 hour rotations. Clinical hours and expectations escalate in the program from an average of 16 hours of clinical to 44 hours.  The maximum number of clinical and didactic hours allowed per week by the COA is 64.
  • Academic Performance
    The DNAP Program has program-specific grading policies. All courses must be completed with a 3.0 or higher grade.  If a student earns a grade below a 3.0 in any course, he/she will be placed on probation.  Subsequent or additional grades below a 3.0 are grounds for dismissal from the Nurse Anesthesia Program.  Appeals will be in accordance with the Nurse Anesthesia Program appeal policy located in the DNAP Student Handbook; grade remediation is in accordance with individual instructors' grading policies. 

Degree Requirements: 88 credits (3,342 clinical hours)

1st Semester  - Summer
DNAP 701 Basic Principles of Anesthesia I 3 credits
DNAP 711 Anatomy and Advanced Physiology I 3 credits
DNAP 721 Advanced Pharmacology I 3 credits
DNAP 731 Advanced Health Assessment 3 credits
2nd Semester - Fall
DNAP 702 Basic Principles of Anesthesia II 3 credits
DNAP 712 Anatomy and Advanced Physiology II 3 credits
DNAP 722 Advanced Pharmacology II 4 credits
DNAP 781 Clinical Practicum: I (108 clinical hours) 1 credit
3rd Semester - Spring
DNAP 703 Advanced Principles of Anesthesia – Regional Anesthesia 3 credits
DNAP 713 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 credits
DNAP 723 Advanced Pharmacology III 3 credits
DNAP 741 Chemistry and Physics of Anesthesia 2 credits
DNAP 782 Clinical Practicum: II (390 clinical hours) 1 credit
4th Semester - Summer
DNAP 704 Advanced Principles: Obstetric Anesthesia 3 credits
DNAP 755 Medical Ethics 3 credits
DNAP 761 Evidence-Based Practice in Anesthesia 3 credits
DNAP 783 Clinical Practicum: III (480 clinical hours) 2 credits
5th Semester - Fall
DNAP 705 Advanced Principles: Pediatric and Neonatal Anesthesia 3 credits
DNAP 754 Culture, Diversity and Health Care Policy 3 credits
DNAP 760 Leadership and Quality Improvement 3 credits  
DNAP 784 Clinical Practicum: IV (480 clinical hours) 2 credits
6th Semester - Spring
DNAP 706 Advanced Principles: Neurosurgical and Thoracic Anesthesia 2 credits
DNAP 762 Research Methods and Design and Data Analysis 3 credits
DNAP 763 Capstone I: Project Design 2 credits
DNAP 785 Clinical Practicum: V (480 clinical hours) 2 credits
7th Semester - Summer
DNAP 707 Advanced Principles: Cardiac and Vascular Anesthesia 2 credits
DNAP 756 Law and Business for Anesthesia 3 credits
DNAP 764 Capstone II: Project Development 2 credits
DNAP 786 Clinical Practicum: VI (480 clinical hours) 2 credits
8th Semester - Fall
DNAP 708 Advanced Principles: Acute and Chronic Pain Management 2 credits
DNAP 765 Capstone III:  Project Implementation 2 credits
DNAP 787 Clinical Practicum: VII (480 clinical hours) 2 credits
9th Semester - Spring
DNAP 709 Advanced Principles of Anesthesia: Integration 3 credits
DNAP 742 Crisis Management in Anesthesia 2 credits
DNAP 769 Oral Exam 0 credits
DNAP 788 Clinical Practicum: VIII (480 clinical hours) 2 credits
DNAP 701 Basic Principles Anesthesia I
3.00 credits
This course assists the doctoral candidate in learning the methods, techniques, and agents involved in the administration of anesthesia. Specific types of anesthetic equipment are demonstrated. The course includes pre- and post-anesthetic assessment of the patient, drugs that augment anesthesia, common complications related to anesthesia, and the importance of initiating and maintaining the patient's anesthesia record during surgery.
DNAP 702 Basic Principles Anesthesia II
3.00 credits
This course is a continuation of DNAP 701 and will enhance the doctoral candidate’s knowledge of pre- and post-anesthetic assessment of the patient, drugs that augment anesthesia, and common complications related to anesthesia. Throughout the course, the candidate will have a variety of experiences learning the theory and techniques administration of anesthesia.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 701 Minimum Grade: B
Concurrent:
DNAP 781
DNAP 703 Adv Prin Anesthes - Regional
3.00 credits
This course will introduce the doctoral candidate to the theory, methods, techniques, anatomy, and agents involved in regional anesthesia. Students will be instructed in the science and administration of neuraxial and peripheral regional anesthesia. Instructions on the use, strategies and science of ultrasound will also be covered.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 702 Minimum Grade: B
Concurrent:
DNAP 782
DNAP 704 Adv Prin: Obstetric Anesthesia
3.00 credits
This course will introduce the doctoral student to anesthesia for the obstetric patient. This course presents epidural anesthesia theory in preparation for the practicum, focuses on anesthesia for routine and complicated obstetric and neonatal patients, and begins the study of clinical anesthesia for routine and high-risk patients. Pharmacology, physiology, pathophysiology and anatomic considerations unique to the obstetric patient will be emphasized.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 703 Minimum Grade: B
Concurrent:
DNAP 783
DNAP 705 Adv Prin:Ped & Neonatal Anesth
3.00 credits
This course will provide the study of principles of pediatric anesthesia including anesthesia for the healthy child and for children with disease states. This course focuses on the study of clinical anesthesia for routine and high-risk care of pediatric patients from neonate through adolescent. Pharmacology, physiology, pathophysiology and anatomic considerations unique to the pediatric patient will be emphasized.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 704 Minimum Grade: B
Concurrent:
DNAP 784
DNAP 706 Adv Prin:Neurosurg&Thoracic An
2.00 credits
This course will introduce the doctoral student to anesthesia for neurosurgical and thoracic (non-cardiac) procedures. Common pathophysiology and conditions associated with these procedures is the focus of study. Invasive monitoring, use of vasoactive drugs, and case studies complete the course.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 705 Minimum Grade: B
Concurrent:
DNAP 785
DNAP 707 Adv Prin:Cardiac & Vascular An
2.00 credits
This course will introduce the doctoral student to anesthesia for peripheral and central vascular procedures, noninvasive cardiac procedures, and open heart procedures. Common pathophysiology and conditions associated with these procedures is the focus of study.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 706 Minimum Grade: B
Concurrent:
DNAP 786
DNAP 708 Adv Prin:Acute&ChronicPain Mgt
2.00 credits
This course will provide the doctoral student with an introduction to the management of acute and chronic pain. The doctoral student will assess and evaluate patients experiencing chronic pain, and develop a plan of care specific to the patients' situations. Acute and chronic pain treatment options, origins, physiological and psychological effects on the patient will be introduced.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 707 Minimum Grade: B
Concurrent:
DNAP 787
DNAP 709 Adv Prin of Ansth: Integration
3.00 credits
This course will prepare the graduating doctoral student for practice as a CRNA by integrating pharmacology, physiology, pathophysiology, principles of anesthesia, experience in clinical practicum, and legal and professional issues in a case management seminar format.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 788 Minimum Grade: B
Concurrent:
DNAP 788
DNAP 711 Anatomy & Adv Physiology I
3.00 credits
Cellular and system physiology and anatomy as it applies to anesthesia practice.
DNAP 712 Anatomy & Physiology II
3.00 credits
Cellular and system physiology and anatomy as it applies to anesthesia practice.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 711 Minimum Grade: B and DNAP 701 Minimum Grade: C
DNAP 713 Adv Pathophysiology
3.00 credits
This course will present common and uncommon disease processes encountered in the anesthetic settings across the lifespan. The participant will gain a better understanding of the general concepts of the disease, including etiology, pathogenesis, treatment strategies and anesthetic implications. These concepts are applied in a systems-oriented approach to disease processes affecting musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, renal, nervous, gastrointestinal, immune, hematological and endocrine systems. By the end of the course, students should be able to understand the relation between the symptoms and disease process.
DNAP 721 Advanced Pharmacology I
3.00 credits
This course covers the fundamentals of blood, respiratory, and pharmaceutical chemistries and the principles of general anesthesia and pharmacology including all pharmaceutical agents used for these purposes and their application in diseased state.
DNAP 722 Adv Pharmacology II
4.00 credits
This course is a continuation of DNAP 721 and involves the doctoral candidate in a deeper study of blood, respiratory and pharmaceutical chemistries and the principles of general anesthesia and pharmacology including all pharmaceutical agents used for these purposes and their application in diseased state with regard to surgical cases.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 721 Minimum Grade: B
DNAP 723 Adv Pharmacology III
3.00 credits
This course, a continuation of DNAP 722, is the last of three courses in this series. It involves the doctoral candidate in an extensive study of blood, respiratory, and pharmaceutical chemistries and the principles of general anesthesia and pharmacology including all pharmaceutical agents used for these purposes and their application in diseased state with regard to surgical cases.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 722 Minimum Grade: B
DNAP 731 Advanced Health Assessment
3.00 credits
This course will prepare the doctoral student to complete a focused history and physical assessment of patients on whom they will administer anesthesia. The body systems assessments that are emphasized are cardiac, respiratory, renal, hepatic, and neurological. An overview of the other systems is included. The student will learn focused history and review of symptoms relative to the proposed procedure and anesthesia management.
DNAP 741 Chem & Physics in Anesthesia
2.00 credits
This course will introduce the doctoral student to the principles of physics as applied specifically to anesthesiology. Included is a review of biomedical instrumentation pertinent to anesthesia, application of the gas laws, and review of principles of uptake and distribution from the perspective of physics.
DNAP 742 Crisis Mgmt in Anesthesia
2.00 credits
This course will introduce the doctoral student to the principles of crisis management in anesthesia, through a serious of case studies and use of high fidelity simulation. Students will be given didactic instruction in dynamic decision-making, human performance issues, and in the principles of anesthesia crisis resource management. Students will be presented with a serious of simulated crisis cases and debriefings covering critical events in anesthesia such as cardiovascular, pulmonary, equipment, obstetric, pediatric and pathophysiologic events.
DNAP 754 Culture, Div &Hlth Care Policy
3.00 credits
Candidates will develop cultural competencies that will help them work more effectively in their professional settings. The course will identify the issues that underlie health care policy development as well as the economic systems that support the financing of health care services in the United States. This course will provide doctoral candidates with the skills to analyze, advocate, and implement health care policy in organizations, communities, and educational environments.
DNAP 755 Medical Ethics
3.00 credits
The course will highlight the function of values clarification in ethical analysis, identify recurrent medical-ethical entanglements impacting the delivery of care, comprehensively detail the major principles of health care ethics, and suggest a manner of their employment to enhance the process of decision-making. Attempting to provide students with the tools requisite to negotiate more effectively the health care system in general, either professionally or personally.
DNAP 756 Law & Business for Anesthesia
3.00 credits
This course examines health care economics and the business of clinical practice as they relate to the delivery of quality health care services, both generally and in the CRNA profession. Doctoral candidates will analyze the driving forces of economics, heath policy, quality improvement, and standards of care in the delivery of health care services in general, and anesthesiology in particular, to maximize health outcomes. Candidates will study economic concepts and business models to critically appraise an anesthesia business issue, design strategies to improve clinical outcomes, and evaluate the achievement of the improvement goals, which will include outcome, safety, fiscal principles, efficiency, and quality. This course also examines health care law and legal issues as they relate to the delivery of quality health care services, both generally and in the CRNA profession. Doctoral candidates will compare civil and criminal law from the anesthesia perspective, tracing an anesthesia lawsuit through the legal system. The nurse practice act related to anesthesia practice and practice options will be emphasized.
DNAP 760 Ldrshp & Quality Improvement
3.00 credits
This course focuses on quality improvement strategies designed to transform care delivery within organizations. Students are introduced to leaderships principles and skills and principles. Students will apply data-driven, customer-focused, statistical-based and process-oriented thinking to common health care problems. Continuous improvement in processes and sharing of results within an organization is emphasized.
DNAP 761 Evidence Based Prac Anesthesia
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the evidence-based practice process and the knowledge and skills that are necessary for the translation of professionally accepted evidence into the advanced clinical practice of anesthesia. Doctoral candidates will compare and contrast various forms of scientific evidence with an emphasis on research technique, instrumentation, study design, and theories that are relevant for advanced clinical practice. This course will also emphasize the critical appraisal skills necessary to ensure meaningful translation of scientific evidence into professional practice in order to ensure the highest quality of patient care and optimal outcomes. This course provides the doctoral candidate the opportunity to integrate evidence-based literature and principles in anesthesia to teach and precept other adults in healthcare settings within the context of professional leadership.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 731 Minimum Grade: B
DNAP 762 Rsrch Mthd, Dsgn&Data Analysis
3.00 credits
This course is designed to help candidates understand the research process through the development of a research proposal including selecting a topic, reviewing the relevant literature, choosing an appropriate collection methodology, and determining the appropriate method to analyze the data.
DNAP 763 Capstone I: Project Design
2.00 credits
The DNAP program culminates in the successful completion of a scholarly project that demonstrates a synthesis of the doctoral candidate's work and lays the groundwork for future scholarship and contribution to the profession. The candidate will engage in scholarly inquiry to analyze, evaluate, or transform a relevant aspect of clinical practice. The focus of this first Capstone course is the analysis of applicable data, after which the candidate will design the project in collaboration with the instructor of the research course and the program directors, along with appropriate faculty and clinical preceptors.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 762 Minimum Grade: B
DNAP 764 Capstone II: Project Dvlpmnt
2.00 credits
This course is a continuation of DNAP 763 Capstone I. The focus of this Capstone course is the development of the project. The candidate will develop the doctoral project in collaboration with the instructor of the research course and the program directors, along with appropriate faculty and clinical preceptors.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 763 Minimum Grade: B
DNAP 765 Capstone III: Project Implmntn
2.00 credits
This course is a continuation of DNAP 763 Capstone I and DNAP 764 Capstone II. The focus of this Capstone course is the actual implementation of the project. The candidate will implement the doctoral project in collaboration with the instructor of the research course and the program directors, along with appropriate faculty and clinical preceptors.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 764 Minimum Grade: B
DNAP 769 Oral Exam
.00 credits
The oral exam meeting is the final, formal interaction among the doctoral candidate, the program directors, and the anesthesiologist liaison. The oral exam focuses on the integration of anesthesia didactic knowledge and clinical critical thinking and decision making. Questions are clinically case-based and range from focused to comprehensive.
DNAP 781 Clinical Practicum: I
1.00 credit
In this practicum, the doctoral candidate will learn the actual administration of anesthesia under the supervision of certified registered nurse anesthetists and physician anesthesiologists. Pre-operative and post-operative assessment of the patient is made by the candidate. The candidate is responsible for selecting the appropriate anesthetic, administering needed pharmaceutical agents, and maintaining homeostasis during general surgical procedures. Monitoring, positioning, and recovery are stressed.
Concurrent:
DNAP 702
DNAP 782 Clinical Practicum: II
1.00 credit
This course is a continuation of DNAP 781. Doctoral candidates rotate through general surgery, special procedures, basic vascular surgery, and basic neurosurgery.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 781 Minimum Grade: S
Concurrent:
DNAP 703
DNAP 783 Clinical Practicum: III
2.00 credits
This course is a continuation of DNAP 782. Doctoral candidates rotate through vascular surgery, neurosurgery, and evening trauma rotations, in addition to general practice.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 782 Minimum Grade: S
Concurrent:
DNAP 704
DNAP 784 Clinical Practicum: IV
2.00 credits
This course provides for the clinical application of knowledge and skills learned in p the study of obstetric anesthesia, and builds upon previous clinical rotations. 30 hours per week for a total of 480 clinical hours.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 783 Minimum Grade: S
Concurrent:
DNAP 705
DNAP 785 Clinical Practicum: V
2.00 credits
This course will provide the clinical application of knowledge and skills learned in DNAP 706 Neurosurgical and Thoracic anesthesia. Doctoral students will be assigned to these cases as part of their clinical rotations, from this semester forward. Other rotations will include pediatrics, obstetrics, general surgery, and out-of-area rotations. 30 hours per week, total 450 clinical hours.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 784 Minimum Grade: S
Concurrent:
DNAP 706
DNAP 786 Clinical Practicum: VI
2.00 credits
This course will provide the third-year clinical practicum rotations for doctoral students and will include assignments in general surgery for adult and pediatric patients, neurosurgery, thoracic, vascular, obstetrics, and out-of-area anesthesia services. This rotation includes assignments to the 3-11 and Saturday shifts. 30 hours per week, total 450 clinical hours.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 785 Minimum Grade: S
Concurrent:
DNAP 707
DNAP 787 Clinical Practicum: VII
2.00 credits
This course will provide the doctoral student with a one-week rotation to a chronic pain management clinic or setting. The student will participate in evaluation of patients, adjunctive therapy decision making, and assist/perform regional anesthesia for chronic pain management via one 36-hour clinical rotation during the last 12 months of the program. This course will provide the third-year clinical practicum rotations for doctoral students and will include assignments in general surgery for adult and pediatric patients, neurosurgery, thoracic, vascular, cardiac, obstetrics, and out-of-area anesthesia services. This rotation includes assignments to the 3-11 and Weekend shifts. 28 hours per week for a total of 476 clinical hours.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 786 Minimum Grade: S
Concurrent:
DNAP 708
DNAP 788 Clinical Practicum: VIII
2.00 credits
This course will provide the third-year clinical practicum rotations for doctoral students and will include assignments in general surgery for adult and pediatric patients, neurosurgery, thoracic, vascular, cardiac, obstetrics, and out-of-area anesthesia services. This rotation includes assignments to the 3-11 and Weekend shifts and one week of 7p-7a obstetric/house assignment. 36 clinical hours per week, for a total of 504 clinical hours.
Prerequisite:
DNAP 787 Minimum Grade: S
Concurrent:
DNAP 709
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.