Sport and Athletic Administration

Chair: Karen Rickel

Master of Arts in Sport and Athletic Administration

Gonzaga University’s M.A. in Sport and Athletic Administration (MASAA) program prepares candidates to be leaders in sport, athletic, and health related professions. This campus based and online program is designed as an interdisciplinary curriculum, grounded in the liberal arts, drawing on studies in educational and organizational theory. An integral part of the program is the internship, in which candidates acquire skills and experience under the supervision of an advisor and a site supervisor. The emphasis is on training candidates to administer programs in accordance with best professional practices. Graduates of the program earn a degree from an academically respected university with a top 10 NCAA brand.

Students move through the program as a cohort, with a new cohort starting each fall. The on-campus curriculum is designed as a 31 semester credit program with an average five semesters completion time for full time students. The online program differs as classes are offered in an accelerated fashion with two courses (approximately 8 weeks in duration) taken each semester. Students can usually complete the program in five semesters, provided they follow the recommended course sequence schedule.

During the past few years, some of the institutions and organizations which have hired our alumni, include: University of Wisconsin Recreation, Washington State University, Boise State University, Drake University, Baylor University, Fresno State University, Whitworth University, Lewis and Clark State College, North Idaho College, University of Portland, University of California Davis, Gonzaga University, Oakland Raiders (NFL), Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA), Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians, Seattle Mariners, San Francisco Giants (MLB), Hillsboro Hops, Everett AquaSox, Spokane Indians (Minor League Baseball), Spokane Chiefs (Western Hockey League), Seattle Thunderbirds, Lethbridge Hurricanes (Western Hockey League), Mizuno, Spokane Regional Sport Commission, Spokane Youth Sports Association (SYSA), Scorebook Live, and more.

Admissions

Campus and Online Admissions Guidelines can be found on the SOE Graduate Admissions webpage

Prerequisite

A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.

Program Outline: 31 credits

EDPE 500 Sport and Athletic Promotions 3 credits
EDPE 501 Sport Media and Communication 3 credits
EDPE 514 Ethical and Legal Aspects in Sport 3 credits
EDPE 525 Sport and Athletics in the Social Context 3 credits
EDPE 565 Research Methods and Statistics in Sport and Athletics 3 credits
EDPE 571 Sport and Athletic Finance 3 credits
EDPE 613 Administration in Athletics and Sports 3 credits
EDPE 621 Facilities Management in Sport and Athletics 3 credits
EDPE 696A - EDPE 696B* Sport and Athletic Administration Internships I & II 6 credits
EDPE 699 Capstone Experience 1 credit
*The online program consists of one internship (696A) and the other 3 credits are replaced with special topic classes that are decided at the beginning of each new cohort.
EDPE 500 Sport & Athletic Promotions
3.00 credits
Study of policies and practices in managing relations with external and internal publics associated with the sport and athletic industry. Media relations, publicity for both print and broadcast press, marketing strategies, advertising and campaign development, sponsorships and marketing ethics are some of the main topics to be covered.
EDPE 501 Sport Media and Communication
3.00 credits
This course will examine today's world of communication by examining the converging industries of journalism, public relations, marketing and advertising as expressed in the new commercial reality of sport. The student will be provided with a history of the sport media and the changes the media has undergone in recent years. The students will also have the opportunity to be placed in the media chair and produce written material as a reporter covering an athlete program or sporting event.
EDPE 514 Ethical/Legal Aspects in Sport
3.00 credits
To familiarize students with the legal and ethical aspects surrounding sport organizations. Topics such as tort law, contract law, agency law, constitutional law, Title IX and IX, ethical theories within the work place are thoroughly covered.
EDPE 515 Elementary Physical Education
1.00 credit
This course will provide students both theoretical and practical experience in learning how to design and implement a physical education program at an elementary level. It will introduce the students to objectives of physical education, activities that can be implemented at specific grade levels, general fitness concepts, and techniques of teaching in a physical activity environment, assessment protocol, and the importance of physical education as an integral part of general education. An experimental and cross disciplinary approach will be taken to developing and implementing effective learning experiences in physical education for students K-8. Permission only; On Demand.
EDPE 516 Elementary Health Methods
1.00 credit
This course will provide students both theoretical and practical experience in learning how to design and implement a health education program at an elementary level. It will introduce the students to objectives of health education, activities that can be implemented at specific grade levels, teaching strategies, assessment protocol, and the importance of health education as an integral part of general education. An experimental and cross disciplinary approach will be taken to developing and implementing effective learning experiences for students K-8. Permission only. On demand.
EDPE 517 Abuse Prevention
1.00 credit
This course will provide students an awareness of the incidence of abuse and the knowledge and skills needed to execute their professional roles and responsibilities, as K-12 educators, in dealing with children who have suffered abuse and neglect. Reporting mandates and legal protection afforded in executing these mandates will also be covered.
EDPE 518 Health/Fitness Methods
3.00 credits
This course will provide students both theoretical and practical experience in learning how to design and implement a health & fitness education program at an elementary level. It will introduce the students to objectives of health and fitness education, activities that can be implemented at specific grade levels, teaching strategies, assessment protocol, and the importance of health and fitness education as an integral part of general education. An experimental and cross disciplinary approach will be taken to developing and implementing effective learning experiences for students K-8. Permission only; on demand.
EDPE 525 Sport & Ath in Social Context
3.00 credits
An analysis of historical sport and athletic events, the structure of sport in societies, and the social factors influencing the positive and negative outcomes of those events. Topics such as diversity, economics, politics, media, and religion will be covered and investigation of the social impact of these issues on sport and athletic environments.
EDPE 565 Rsrch Mth & Stats in Sprt Athl
3.00 credits
This course focuses on the research methods, statistical techniques and applications of social research and evaluation process using SPSS in the context of sport and athletics. Students are required to complete his/her individual research proposal by the end of semester consisting of three chapters (introduction, review of literature, and methodology) and also are given the opportunity to learn and practice SPSS, statistical computer software for social science.
EDPE 571 Sport & Athletic Finance
3.00 credits
Analysis of budget techniques and strategies for financial planning and decision making in sport and athletic programs. Emphasis will be given to revenue productions and fundraising relevant to both community and school supported sport programs.
EDPE 590 Directed Readings
1.00- 3.00 credits
Directed readings requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
EDPE 591 Directed Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Directed Study requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
EDPE 592 Independent Study
1.00- 4.00 credits
Independent Study requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
EDPE 594 Special Projects
1.00- 3.00 credits
Special Projects requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB.
EDPE 611 Continuing Research
1.00 credit
Required of all graduate students to maintain continuous enrollment in the program while completing their final project.
EDPE 613 Admin in Sport & Athletics
3.00 credits
Students will study organizational theories and practices with an emphasis on the sport industries. Leadership styles and theories, organizational development, personnel, fiscal, and legal issues will be covered.
EDPE 621 Facilities Mgmt in Sport & Ath
3.00 credits
This course covers theories, policies, principles, and practical applications of facility management and operations with the special emphasis on designing, planning, operating, maintaining of the sport facility. Students will develop and utilize a variety of materials reflective of sport event and venue operations such as an event bidding proposal, a facility review evaluation report, area of expert papers and case studies.
EDPE 689 Master's Research Project
3.00 credits
This course involves the identification and in-depth exploration of a topic or issue in physical education, athletics, or sports administration in preparation for the final oral presentation. The project must be completed and submitted in a written form or manuscript suitable for publication.
Prerequisite:
EDPE 565
EDPE 696A Sport & Athl Admin:Intern I
3.00 credits
An intensive field supervised experience in a sport or athletic related organization approved by the instructor of record.
EDPE 696B Sport & Athl Admin:Intern II
3.00 credits
A continuation of EDPE 696A. An intensive field supervised experience in a sport or athletic related organization approved by the instructor of record.
Prerequisite:
EDPE 696A Minimum Grade: C
EDPE 696C Sport & Athl Admin:Intern III
3.00 credits
A continuation of 696B. An intensive field supervised experience in the sport or athletic organization approved by the instructor of record.
Prerequisite:
EDPE 696B Minimum Grade: C
EDPE 699 Capstone Experience
.00- 1.00 credits
This is a student's final experience demonstrating competency in content knowledge through an oral or written project. The student will prepare a final portfolio of work accomplished throughout the program and present it to a designated audience.
EDPE 900 Workshop
1.00- 12.00 credits
 

In addition to their major and minor areas of study, all undergraduate students follow a common program designed to complete their education in those areas that the University considers essential for a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal, and humanistic education. The University Core Curriculum consists of forty-five credits of course work, with additional designation requirements that can be met through core, major, or elective courses.

The University Core Curriculum is a four-year program, organized around one overarching question, which is progressively addressed through yearly themes and questions. Hence, core courses are best taken within the year for which they are designated. First year core courses encourage intellectual engagement and provide a broad foundation of fundamental skills. Second and third year courses examine central issues and questions in philosophy and religious studies. The fourth year course, the Core Integration Seminar, offers a culminating core experience. Taken at any time throughout the four years, broadening courses intersect with the core themes and extend students’ appreciation for the humanities, arts, and social and behavioral sciences. Finally, the designation requirements (writing enriched, global studies, and social justice) reflect important values and reinforce students’ knowledge and competencies.

Overarching Core Question: As students of a Catholic, Jesuit, and Humanistic University, how do we educate ourselves to become women and men for a more just and humane global community?
Year 1 Theme and Question: Understanding and Creating: How do we pursue knowledge and cultivate understanding?

  • The First-Year Seminar (DEPT 193, 3 credits): The First-Year Seminar (FYS), taken in the fall or spring of the first year, is designed to promote an intellectual shift in students as they transition to college academic life. Each small seminar is organized around an engaging topic, which students explore from multiple perspectives. The FYS is offered by many departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of FYS courses).  
  • Writing (ENGL 101, 3 credits) and Reasoning (PHIL 101, 3 credits): The Writing and Reasoning courses are designed to help students develop the foundational skills of critical reading, thinking, analysis, and writing. They may be taken as linked sections. Writing (ENGL 101) carries one of the three required writing-enriched designations (see below).
  • Communication & Speech (COMM 100, 3 credits): This course introduces students to interpersonal and small group communication and requires the application of critical thinking, reasoning, and research skills necessary to organize, write, and present several speeches.
  • Scientific Inquiry (BIOL 104/104L, CHEM 104/104L, or PHYS 104/104L, 3 credits): This course explores the scientific process in the natural world through evidence-based logic and includes significant laboratory experience. Students pursuing majors that require science courses will satisfy this requirement through their major.
  • Mathematics (above Math 100, 3 credits): Mathematics courses promote thinking according to the modes of the discipline—abstractly, symbolically, logically, and computationally. One course in mathematics, above Math 100, including any math course required for a major or minor, will fulfill this requirement. MATH 100 (College Algebra) and courses without the MATH prefix do not fulfill this requirement.

Year 2 Theme and Question: Being and Becoming: Who are we and what does it mean to be human?

  • Philosophy of Human Nature (PHIL 201, 3 credits): This course provides students with a philosophical study of key figures, theories, and intellectual traditions that contribute to understanding the human condition; the meaning and dignity of human life; and the human relationship to ultimate reality.
  • Christianity and Catholic Traditions (RELI, 3 credits). Religious Studies core courses approved for this requirement explore diverse topics including Christian scriptures, history, theology, and practices as well as major contributions from the Catholic intellectual and theological traditions (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses) .

Year 3 Theme and Question: Caring and Doing: What principles characterize a well lived life?

  • Ethics (PHIL 301 or RELI, 3 credits): The Ethics courses are designed to help students develop their moral imagination by exploring and explaining the reasons humans should care about the needs and interests of others. This requirement is satisfied by an approved ethics course in either Philosophy (PHIL 301) or Religious Studies (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • World/Comparative Religion (RELI, 3 credits): Religious Studies courses approved for this core requirement draw attention to the diversity that exists within and among traditions and encourage students to bring critical, analytical thinking to bear on the traditions and questions considered. These courses carries one of the required two global-studies designations (see below) (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Year 4 Theme and Question: Imagining the Possible: What is our role in the world?” 

  • Core Integration Seminar (DEPT 432, 3 credits). The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) offers students a culminating core experience in which they integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the core, and their disciplinary expertise. Some CIS courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor. The CIS is offered by several departments across the University (click here [PDF] for list of CIS courses).

The Broadening Courses

  • Fine Arts & Design (VART, MUSC, THEA, 3 credits): Arts courses explore multiple ways the human experience can be expressed through creativity, including across different cultures and societies. One approved course in fine arts, music, theatre, or dance will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • History (HIST, 3 credits): History courses are intended to develop students’ awareness of the historical context of both the individual and the collective human experience. One course in History (HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 112, HIST 201, HIST 202) will fulfill this requirement.
  • Literature (3 credits): Literature courses foster reflection on how literature engages with a range of human experience. One approved course in Literature (offered by English, Classics, or Modern Languages) will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits): Courses in the social and behavioral sciences engage students in studying human behavior, social systems, and social issues. One approved course offered by Criminal Justice, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies will fulfill this requirement (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

The Designations
Designations are embedded within already existing core, major, minor, and elective courses. Students are encouraged to meet designation requirements within elective courses as their schedule allows; however, with careful planning students should be able to complete most of the designation requirements within other core, major, or minor courses.

  • Writing Enriched (WE; 3 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the WE designation are designed to promote the humanistic and Jesuit pedagogical ideal of clear, effective communication. In addition to the required core course, Writing (ENGL 101), which carries one of the WE designations, students must take two other WE-designated courses (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Global-Studies (GS; 2 courses meeting this designation): Courses carrying the GS designation are designed to challenge students to perceive and understand human diversity by exploring diversity within a context of constantly changing global systems. In addition to the required core course, World/Comparative Religion (RELI 300-level), which carries one of the GS designations, students must take one other GS-designated course (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).
  • Social-Justice (SJ; 1 course meeting this designation): Courses carrying the SJ designation are designed to introduce students to one or more social justice concerns. Students must take one course that meets the SJ designation (click here [PDF] for a list of approved courses).

Major-specific adaptations to the University Core Curriculum

All Gonzaga students, regardless of their major, will complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. However some Gonzaga students will satisfy certain core requirements through major-specific programs or courses. Any major-specific adaptations to the core are described with the requirements for the majors to which they apply.