Jaishikha Nautiyal, Ph.D.

Lecturer of Communication Studies

Jaishikha is a rhetorical scholar whose research takes place at the intersections of new materialist rhetorics featuring the body in everyday life, communication ethics, pragmatist aesthetics, and affect theory. Her pedagogy emphasizes experientially...

Portrait of Jaishikha Nautiyal, Lecturer of Communication Studies at Gonzaga University

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Education & Curriculum Vitae

BA: Chemistry Honours, Hindu College, University of Delhi (India)

MA: Speech Communication, North Dakota State University (Fargo, ND)

Ph.D.: Rhetoric and Language Studies, University of Texas at Austin (Austin, TX)


Jaishikha is a rhetorical scholar whose research takes place at the intersections of new materialist rhetorics featuring the body in everyday life, communication ethics, pragmatist aesthetics, and affect theory. Her pedagogy emphasizes experientially immersive approaches to learning with a deep attention to the rhythms of everyday life (particularly those entailing musical currents). Currently, she is speculating on the relations between India’s sensory state apparatuses and their state-sponsored aesthetic violence within emergent Hindu nationalist rhetorics. Furthermore, she is also interested in unpacking the surveillance techniques of a sexist and gendered terroir around alcohol consumption in India (Quarantine Edition). In her free time, Jaishikha enjoys quiet vibe-checks with all manner of more-than-human entanglements, meditative ambles, coffee shops (pre-pandemic), fragrances, ambient music amidst hefty doses of entspánnung, playful writing, amateur photography, and belly-aching laughs with loved ones, whenever and however possible.

Nautiyal, J. (2020). “Tease and persist: A scratchy note to White ‘Allies’.” Women & Language, 43(1), 141-145 (invited forum essay).

Nautiyal, J. (forthcoming 2020). “Queer aesthetics and playful politics in Luca Guadagnino’s filmic adaptation ‘Call Me by Your Name’: An Artful rhizome.” In Routledge International Handbook of Communication and Gender (invited book chapter).

Nautiyal, J. (2018). “Becoming a detour de force: De-hierarchizing directionality and mobility in rhetorical research.” Women’s Studies in Communication (special issue), 41(4), 430-40.

Stroud, S. R., & Nautiyal, J. (2018). “Stoic rhetoric and the ethics of empowered individualism: “The Will to Believe” as Moral Philosophy.” In J. L. Goodson (ed.), William James, Moral Philosophy, and the Ethical Life: The Cries of the Wounded. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Stroud, S. R., & Nautiyal, J. (2017). “Embedded stories and the use of ambiguity in ancient Indian narratives: Selfshadowing in the Anugītā.” Journal of Narrative Theory, 47(2), 167-196.

Nautiyal, J. (2016). “Aesthetic and affective experiences in coffee shops: A Deweyan engagement with ordinary affects in ordinary spaces.” Education and Culture: The Journal of John Dewey Society, 32 (2), 99-118.

Nautiyal, J. (2016). Writing the desire that fire bore: Emergent motherhood in Hélène Cixous's The book of Promethea. Women's Studies in Communication, 39(4), 380-398.

Nautiyal, J. (2016). “Listening with/to nature’s voice: An ethical polyphony.” International Journal of Listening, 30(3), 151-162.