alma khasawnih, Ph.D.

Teaching Fellow of Communication Studies

alma khasawnih earned a Ph.D. in Feminist Studies from the University of Washington, Seattle; an MA in Community Art Education from Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; and a BA in Environmental Policy and Behavior from the University of Michigan,...

Portrait of alma khasawnih, Ph.D. Teaching Fellow of Communication Studies

alma khasawnih earned a Ph.D. in Feminist Studies from the University of Washington, Seattle; an MA in Community Art Education from Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; and a BA in Environmental Policy and Behavior from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

alma’s doctorate is from the Department of Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her scholarship focuses on access to the street in post-colonial and settler-colonial nation states as a site to understanding and articulating access to citizenship. alma's current research projects examine ephemeral visual culture production as sites that orient, disorient, and reorient feminist debates on social political cultural movements within urban geographies and the phenomenology of erasure, cooptation, and resistance. alma is invested in examining how urban beautification projects and cleansing public spaces are part of authoritarian visual culture and politics of respectability that aim at policing minoritized bodies in public spaces.

khasawnih, alma (2018). “Four Times Egyptian Identity: Mural collaboration as dissent in times of crisis.” InVisibleCulture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture, March 15, 2018.

khasawnih, alma. “Public Conversations: Graffiti and Public Art.” In Handbook on Middle East women. Edited by Suad Joseph and Zeina Zaatari, Routhledge, (forthcoming).

khasawnih, alma. “Representations of Protesting Bodies: Gender and morality in graffiti and murals of the Egyptian Revolution.” In An Echoing Resistance: Art of the Arab Spring and Its Aftermath, edited by Jennifer Heath.

alma’s areas of research interest are: popular visual culture, public space/streets, social change, revolution, authoritarianism, transnational and Arab feminisms, human geography, urbanism, postcolonial and settler-colonial nationalism.