Faculty


Picture of Dr. Cynthia Johnson
Dr. Cynthia Johnson

Chair / Director of British Columbia and Alberta Advisory Boards

502 E. Boone, Ave
AD Box 025
Spokane, WA 99250-0025

Phone: (509) 313-3650

Office Location
RC 128

Cynthia Johnson is an Associate Professor and the Director of Principal Certification at Gonzaga University.  She has been involved in education since 1994 with seven years of experience as a school administrator for both elementary and intermediate schools, achieving recognition in 2013 as the Jeanne Foster Wardian Leadership in Education Award from the School of Education at G.U., the 2012  winner of the Leading for Professional Learning Award through Learning Forward, and one of five finalists for the 2007 Texas Principal of the Year. She received her doctoral degree in Educational Leadership with a cognate focus on the role of Superintendent in Schools from Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. She has two master’s degrees, one in School Administration and the other in Special Education. She also holds state certifications in Elementary Education, Special Education, Biology, School Administrator, and School Superintendent. Dr. Johnson has also contributed to the development of future school administrators through Partners for Educational Leadership at the service center in Corpus Christi, Texas. She is passionate about mentoring and coaching struggling principals. Her areas of interest in education have been creating collaborative teaming in PreK-12 schools, school relationships, culture, and morale, PreK-12 instructional practices, transformational school leadership, technology and online/blended learning, and working with at-risk students and families.

 
Picture of Dan Mahoney
Dan Mahoney

Professor

502 E. Boone, Avenue
AD Box 025
Spokane, WA 99250-0025

Phone: (509) 313-3584
Fax: (509) 313-3482

Office Location
RC 128

Office Hours
Wednesdays and Thursdays, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

My primary area of research is the practical and professional ethics of teachers and administrators. This research has evolved into designing and teaching courses in ethics for the Department of Leadership and Administration, and it has resulted in five books, each of which examines the role of organizational dynamics in shaping ethically compromising situations. These books are designed to help teachers and administrators understand, and more effectively deal with, the ethical compromises that arise from the complex organizational and interpersonal demands of their leadership roles.

In my preparation for, and in my practice of, teaching in K-12 classrooms, I believed the primary task of the classroom teacher was to create and maintain an environment that ensured that students' individual talents and strengths were recognized and encouraged to flourish; an environment that supported students in their attempts to work through the difficult developmental tasks and academic challenges of growing up; an environment that assisted parents in developing perspective as they raised their children.

The role of the educational leader is much the same, but on a larger, organizational level.  Educational leadership expands the realm of responsibility and, consequently, intensifies the total impact one has on the learning environment.  I believe in a systemic approach to the necessary transformation of schools.  I believe if we educate and encourage educators to use their professional and expert power, schools can become a self-shaping environment in which parents, teachers, administrators, and students share both the responsibilities and the opportunities for making meaningful decisions about schools.

I am professionally dedicated to school renewal, not school reform.  The difference between reform and renewal is that reform is about whatever is politically fashionable, pendulum-like in popularity, and usually under-funded, lacking in professional development, and short-lived.  Renewal is about the process of individual connections in the lives of educators working together to understand and improve their professional practice.  Renewal is not about a point in time; it is about all points in time.  Renewal is about continuous critical inquiry in action related to principled innovation, including current practices, that might improve education.  Through the courses I teach in the various programs in the School of Education, my job is to be engaged in, and help engage teachers in, an ongoing process of educational renewal.

 
Picture of Elaine Radmer, Ph.D.
Elaine Radmer, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

502 E Boone Ave Spokane, WA 99258-0025
AD Box 025

Office Location
RC 136

Elaine has taught high school math and science as well as English in China.  She has a doctorate in Educational Psychology from Washington State University and recently worked as a Science Assessment Specialist for the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), overseeing the development of state science assessments. 

 
Picture of Dr. Chuck Salina
Dr. Chuck Salina

Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Educational Leadership and Administration

502 E Boone Ave Spokane, WA 99258-0025
AD Box 025
Spokane, WA 99258

Phone: (509) 313-3643

Office Location
RC 144

 
Picture of Jerri Shepard
Jerri Shepard

Associate Professor

502 E Boone Ave Spokane, WA 99258-0025
AD Box 025
Spokane, WA 99258-0025

Phone: (509) 313-3471
Fax: (509) 313-3472

Office Location
RC 116

Office Hours
Tuesday, 10-12 Thursday 11-12 & by appointment

Jerri Shepard is an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Administration and the Director of the British Columbia Advisory Board.  She teaches graduate courses in Alberta and British Columbia, Canada, and undergraduate courses on campus and in Zambia, Africa. 

 Jerri graduated from The University of San Francisco, with a doctoral degree in Counseling Psychology.  She spent 20 years working as a psychologist and counselor in schools, hospitals and juvenile justice systems, supporting marginalized and disenfranchised youth.  She was the Director of The Institute for Action Against Hate, a human rights organization at Gonzaga University, and currently serves on their Advisory Board.

Jerri’s courses on Intercultural Competence Development address culture from a wide spectrum, including race and ethnicity, socio-economic status, ability level, national origin, Indigenous heritage, gender and sexual orientation, and religion.  She incorporates visual arts and personal narratives in her teaching. Jerri has a long-standing interest in human rights and social justice, which support the mission of Gonzaga University.