College Events

All events are open to the public.
All events are free unless otherwise noted.

September

Department of Theatre & Dance

Waiting for Godot
by Samuel Beckett (ZagLab)

Thursday, September 7, 2017
7:30 pm
Magnuson Theatre

Saturday, September 9, 2017
7:30 pm (Sustainability Fair starts at 7:00 pm)
Washington Cracker Building

Sunday, September 10, 2017
2:00 pm (Sustainability Fair starts at 1:30 pm)
Washington Cracker Building

Beckett’s Waiting for Godot humorously depicts the futility of action and inaction. This rendition is an original, site-responsive production within an immersive ceramic installation by guest artist J.J. McCracken and GU Art faculty Mat Rude.

The installation depicts a melting glacial field and will serve as the venue for the production. It is designed to degrade in response to the weather and our local output of waste and will be open to the public from June 8 through September 10. This final weekend of performances will speak to the unpredictable nature of the installation and raise questions about our collective response to climate change.

The sustainability fair will feature organizations from our community including Spokane Arts, Spokane River Keepers, Fuse Environmental Action Team, and the City’s Environment & Sustainability Office at each performance in June and September.

ZagLab, an experimental initiative from Gonzaga’s departments of Art and Theatre & Dance in partnership with Terrain, is envisioned to pursue original interdisciplinary artistic collaborations, encourage artistic risk taking, and foster adventurous creative inquiry among and between students and faculty.

Tickets $20. Purchase tickets here.

Presented by Gonzaga University's
Philosophy and Women’s and Gender Studies Departments,
local activist organization The Resistance Salon, and The Black Lens

Dominique Christina

Saturday, September 16, 2017
4:00 – 7:00 Mixer
The Reserve, 120 N. Wall Street

Sunday, September 17, 2017
6:00 – 9:00 pm Performance
Saranac Rooftop, 21 W. Main Avenue

Monday, September 18, 2017
  6:00 pm Writing Workshop
Jundt Auditorium, Gonzaga University

Social justice poet, black feminist, educator, activist and two-time Women of the World Slam Champion, Dominique Christina is performing at the Saranac Rooftop and conducting a writing workshop at Gonzaga University. The performance is a public event which will feature D. Christina’s powerful work that focuses on issues of womanhood and race and is greatly influenced by her family’s legacy in the Civil Rights Movement and by the idea that "words make worlds." The workshop will focus on how art and poetry are conduits for both social change and healing.

Dean’s Research and Creative Activity Forum

Profane Parables: Film and the American Dream
Matthew Rindge, Gonzaga University

Thursday, September 21, 2017
4:30 pm
Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University

The sacred ethos of the American Dream is a central pillar of the dominant religion in America, America itself. A central tenet of this Dream is a gospel of unfettered success. Profane Parables examines three films that assault this venerated American myth. Fight Club, American Beauty, and About Schmidt indict the American Dream as a meaningless enterprise that is existentially, ethically, and aesthetically bankrupt. In their blistering critique of the hallowed wisdom of the American Dream, these films function like Jesus' parables. Rindge illustrates the religious function of these films as profane parables of sacred subversion.

Catholic Identity, Diversity  and Intercultural Competence:

Integral, Compatible or Contradictory?

A Community Conversation on Commitments in the Gonzaga Mission Statement
Dr. Michael Galligan-Stierle, President/CEO of the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities

Friday, September 22, 2017
3:00 – 7:30
Jepson Center Room TBD
Gonzaga University

“How can Gonzaga be faithful to its Catholic identity and at the same time keep its commitments to diversity and intercultural competence? This question, posed by students both Catholic and non-Catholic, provides the impetus for this community conversation. The question invites reflection on and analysis of the dual commitments to Catholic identity and to valuing diversity and growing intercultural competence that are embedded in Gonzaga’s mission statement.

The Statement of Affirmation Concerning Gonzaga University as a Jesuit University claims that a convergence of the academic world and the commitment to our mission values “can only be accomplished by facilitating a continuous dialogue within the campus community.” Hence, this conversation seeks to gather faculty, students, and staff in a space for thoughtful reflection and discussion of the assumptions behind, issues in, and implications of the key terms—Catholic identity, diversity, and intercultural competence.

RSVP here.

October

Witness to Innocence:
Death Penalty and Race in America

Wednesday, October 4, 2017
7:00-9:00
Hemmingson Auditorium

Gonzaga University

A panel discussion featuring death row exonerees Sabrina Butler-Smith and Randal Padgett from Witness to Innocence.

Department of Theatre & Dance

Constellations
by Nick Payne

Friday, October 6 – Saturday, October 7, 2017
7:30 pm

Sunday, October 8, 2017
2:00 pm

Magnuson Theatre
Gonzaga University

Constellations is a spellbinding romantic journey that begins with a simple encounter between two people...with ideas about physics, parallel universes and the tension between free will and fate.

Student director Annika Perez-Krikorain presents a “splash” production for Zag Fam Weekend with an all-student cast and student designers. From a cast pool, actors will be randomly selected for each performance and meet for the first time on stage when the characters meet for the first time. Art imitating life!

All seats $5.

Department of Music

Concert Choir ZagFam Weekend Concert

Friday, October 6, 2017
7:00 pm
St. Aloysius Catholic Church
Gonzaga University

Free and open to the public.

College of Arts & Sciences Expo

“Words that Matter: What I Learned on the Road During a Contentious Election.”
Poet Laureate Tod Marshall, Gonzaga University

Saturday, October 7, 2017
9:00 am
Hemmingson 314A
Gonzaga University

Beginning in 2016, Washington Poet Laureate Tod Marshall has driven nearly 35,000 miles throughout Washington and flown back and forth to SeaTac many, many times. His journeys to "spread awareness of poetry" have been compelling against the backdrop of a polarized country—and state. Marshall will share observations from his travels and contemplate why the lessons he learned continue to be so important, while also offering a sampling of poems that might help us think about these divided times.

For complete details of CAS events during ZagFam Weekend, click here.

College of Arts & Sciences Expo

Humanities in Our Everyday Lives, or
Why Studying Popular Culture Matters
Ann Ciasullo, Gonzaga University

Saturday, October 7, 2017
9:45 am
Hemmingson 314B
Gonzaga University

Are the Humanities really everywhere? The 2017-19 Robert K. and Ann J. Powers Chair, Associate Professor Ann Ciasullo, will make the case that the humanities are not only in the books we read and teach but also in the media that is part of our everyday lives: in movies both good and bad, in popular music, in television, and on social media. Professor Ciasullo's presentation will bring together texts from both "high" and "low" culture to illustrate how the humanities influence us on a daily basis.

Please join us at 9:45 am for a reception celebrating Dr. Ciasullo's installation as the new Powers Chair!

For complete details of CAS events during ZagFam Weekend, click here.

College of Arts & Sciences Expo

Telling War
Lisa Silvestri, Gonzaga University

Saturday, October 7,  2017
11:00 am
Hemmingson 314A
Gonzaga University

Telling War juxtaposes two eras of conflict, WWI and the wars in Iraq & Afghanistan, as a framework and impetus for discussion. Telling War begins with the voices of troops and veterans by looking at “user-generated content” from WWI as well as Iraq & Afghanistan (i.e., letters, e-mails, poems, postcards, etchings, photos, songs, and videos). Using these frontline dispatches as a starting point, students consider what modes of communication were prominent during particular deployments and how those shaped what could be talked about, to whom, when, and where.

For complete details of CAS events during ZagFam Weekend, click here.

College of Arts & Sciences Expo

Race and the College Campus
Brian Cooney, Gonzaga University

Saturday, October 7, 2017
1:00 pm
Hemmingson 314A
Gonzaga University

In light of the socially charged climate of today’s U.S., this forum will provide insight into the role race plays on the college campus and how the Jesuit model of education addresses issues of exclusion. Joan Iva Fawcett, the new head of Diversity, Inclusion, and Cultural Engagement; Sara Diaz of Women’s and Gender Studies; Vik Gumbhir of Sociology/Criminal Justice; and Brian Cooney of the Center for Public Humanities will explain their work and why it’s important.

For complete details of CAS events during ZagFam Weekend, click here.

College of Arts & Sciences Expo

Digital Humanities Across Borders
Katey Roden, Gonzaga University

Saturday, October 7, 2017
2:00 pm
Hemmingson Auditorium
Gonzaga University

Digital Humanities is an interdisciplinary field that invites students to analyze digital cultures and environments by employing technology and new media to deepen our understanding of the human experience. Join faculty and students from the College of Arts & Sciences as they showcase Digital Humanities projects that reach across borders to highlight the ways in which digital tools and environments enhance humanistic inquiry via experiential learning. We’ll cross disciplinary borders as we hear from students developing a digital accompaniment to Weaving Our Sisters’ Voices, an original dance production written and directed by GU faculty. We’ll cross cultural and national borders as we learn from students who spent time in Cali, Colombia helping to produce digital platforms in support of local community activists engaging in community and peace building. Augmented Reality (AR) technology will also enable us to venture across the boundaries of time and space, as a student research project brings us face-to-face with historic buildings across Gonzaga’s campus.

For complete details of CAS events during ZagFam Weekend, click here.

Department of Music

Women's & Men's Chorus Casual Concert

Saturday, October 7, 2017
3:00 pm
University Chapel
Gonzaga University

Free and open to the public.

Department of Music

Jazz Sampler Concert

Sunday, October 8, 2017
12:00 pm
Hemmingson Center Ballroom
Gonzaga University

Free and open to the public.

William L. Davis, S.J. Lecture

Deportation: The Origins of U.S. Immigration and Deportation Policy
Dr. Torrie Hester, Saint Louis University

Tuesday, October 10, 2017
NEW TIME: 6:00 pm
Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University

Dr. Hester will discuss her new book, Deportation: The Origins of U.S. Policy. She will present her research on U.S. immigration policy and its impact on geopolitics and examine the meanings of immigrant and citizen as they have changed since 1892.

Dr. Hester is a U.S. historian interested in subjects ranging from immigration and region, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and law and foreign policy during the late nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries.

Conservation and Development: Territorial Appropriation of the Amazon
Germán Palacio

Wednesday, October 11, 2017
7:30 pm
Jundt Art Museum Room 110
Gonzaga University

Germán Palacio, Colombian scholar, lawyer and historian, will discuss the political ecology of conservation and indigenous land rights in the Amazon.

Free and open to the public.

Department of Music

Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra
With Lynn Harrell, cello soloist

Monday, October 16, 2017
7:30 pm
Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox

Tickets $12 – $15, free with Gonzaga University ID. Tickets available here.

Washington at War: The Evergreen State in World War I
Dr. Lorraine McConaghy, Humanities Washington

Thursday, October 19, 2017
7:00 pm
Globe Room, Cataldo Hall
Gonzaga University

One-hundred years ago in 1917, the US entered The Great War to fight alongside our European allies. But Washington’s homefront experience began long before the country entered the war, and it continued afterward, too.

Historian Dr. Lorraine McConaghy will present an illustrated introduction to the war’s themes before reading a “Readers’ Theater” along with the audience, allowing participants to speak the history of the war’s impact on Washington—and how Washington impacted the war—as they discover it themselves.

The reading covers the period between the successful Prohibition referendum in 1914 through Seattle’s General Strike and President Woodrow Wilson’s visit to Washington in 1919 and includes excerpts from newspapers, diaries, writings, speeches, and correspondence. Join us as we learn about and discuss this dramatic period of immigration, wartime industrialization, women’s rights, social change, radical labor, epidemic disease, and worldwide turmoil.

Lorraine McConaghy is a public historian who earned her PhD from the University of Washington. At the Museum of History & Industry and Washington State History Museum, her work as historian and curator has dealt with Washington at war during the Treaty War of 1855-1856, the Civil War, World War I, and World War II. She has participated in working groups concerning the opportunities of commemoration, and presented lectures and workshops on readers’ theater programs at National Council on Public History, American Association for State and Local History, and the Washington Museum Association. In 2009, her readers’ theater script, Speaking Out, won the national performance award from the Oral History Association. In 2015, AASLH honored her Voices of the Civil War with a national award of merit. McConaghy’s work has been honored by the Washington State Historical Society’s Robert Gray Medal, the annual award of the Pacific Northwest Historians Guild, and the Humanities Washington Award.

Archaeology and the Humanities
An International Archaeology Day Event

Saturday, October 21, 2017
9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University

Archaeology and the Humanities is a full day symposium at Gonzaga University in celebration of National Archaeology Day. The event will feature 20-minute talks by over a dozen archaeologists, art historians, and ancient historians based at universities and other institutions in the Pacific Northwest. Speakers will discuss their current research and fieldwork on projects focused on ancient Mediterranean cultures, particularly those of Greece and Rome. They will also contextualize their work within a wider perspective, specifically how their findings relate to our broader understanding of human culture and interactivity across time and space.

Department of Music

Brahms: A Recital for Cello & Piano
Featuring Kevin Hekmatpanah and Rajung Yang, Gonzaga University

Saturday, October 21, 2017
4:00 pm
University Chapel
Gonzaga University

Brahms Sonata No. 2 in F Major
Franck Sonata in A Major

Free and open to the public.

An Evening with Angela Davis
Dr. Angela Davis, University of California Santa Cruz

Wednesday, October 25, 2017
7:00 pm
Hemmingson Ballroom
Gonzaga University

A talk by activist and scholar Angela Davis with brief Q&A to follow.

Free and open to the public. Tickets required, distribution information forthcoming.

Department of Music

Gonzaga Symphonic Band

Sunday, October 29, 2017
3:00 pm
Cataldo Globe Room
Gonzaga University

Free and open to the public.

"They Are Always at the Front”:
Native American Soldiers in the Great War
Ryan Booth, Washington State University

Tuesday, October 31, 2017
6:00 pm
Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University

The talk will provide background on Native American military traditions and discuss how service in the U.S. Armed forces extends and reflects those traditions. This talk is jointly supported by NTAS and History, as part of the History Department's WWI Centennial Observance.

Ryan Booth (Swinomish) is a PhD student at WSU. His research focuses on Native American military scouts and military service, from the mid-nineteenth century through WWI.

November

Distinguished Researcher Lecture

How Early Life Stress “Gets Under the Skin,” and What Should We Do About It?
Dr. Nicole Bush, Center for Health and Community
University of California, San Francisco

Public Lecture
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
7:30 pm
Hemmingson Ballroom

Student and Faculty Talk
Thursday, November 2, 2017
12:0 pm
Jundt Auditorium
Gonzaga University

Exposure to adversity has well-documented links to mental and physical health across the life course, and exposure during sensitive periods early in development appears to be particularly potent.

Dr. Bush will share details of her recent work examining prenatal programming of offspring mental and physical health within Bay area and national samples of pregnant women and their children. She will also share details of her work within the newly-funded Environmental influences on Child Health (ECHO) program consortium—a national children’s study designed to understand the effects of chemical and social exposures and their interaction on children’s neurodevelopment, physical health, and wellbeing.

In addition, Dr. Bush will highlight the current literature examining biological embedding of early life stress across both clinical and community samples, and the potential for reversing harmful effects on biological and social functioning.

Fall Flannery Lecture

Passing Over: Migration, Theology, and the Eucharist
Fr. Daniel F. Groody, C.S.C., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame

Thursday, November 2, 2017
6:00 pm
Hemmingson Ballroom
Gonzaga University

Amidst the divisive and polarizing rhetoric around migrants and refugees today, what does it mean to be witness to the body of Christ? This talk will explore the integral connection between what happens inside Churches and what happens outside of them by looking at the relationship between those who cross borders today looking for a more dignified life and the One who crossed over into our world in the incarnation in order to bring us to our eternal homeland. It will look at some of the arguments around migration today, some of the key challenges we face as a global family, some of the ways of looking at the issue of migration from a theological perspective.

Daniel Groody is a Catholic priest, a Holy Cross religious, and an award winning teacher, author and film producer. He is currently an Associate Professor of Theology and Global Affairs and the Faculty Director of the Global Leadership Program at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame.

Department of Theatre & Dance

tick, tick...BOOM!

by Jonathan Larson

Thursday-Saturday, November 2 – 4, 2017
7:30 pm
Sunday, November 5, 2017
2:00 pm
Thursday-Saturday, November 9 – 11, 2017
7:30 pm
Sunday, November 12, 2017
2:00 pm
Magnuson Theatre
Gonzaga University

Director Courtney Smith brings to stage the story of a composer and the sacrifices he made to achieve his big break in theatre. Jon's girlfriend wants to get married and move out of the city, his best friend is making big bucks on Madison Avenue, and yet Jon is still waiting on tables and trying to write the great American musical. Set in 1990, this compelling story of personal discovery is presented as a rock musical filled with instantly appealing melodies and a unique blend of musical theatre styles.

Everyone will love this youthful, endearing and thoughtful piece, and will surely embrace the universal ideal of holding onto your dreams through life's most difficult challenges.

$15 general admission, $10 with active Gonzaga University ID.  

Department of Music

Jazz Combos 1 & 2

Friday, November 3, 2017
4:30 pm
Music Annex
Gonzaga University

Free and open to the public.

Department of Music

Reformation 500: Bach & Beyond
Chamber Chorus and Incendo Music Ensemble

Friday, November 3, 2017
7:30 pm
St. Mark’s Lutheran Church
South Hill, Spokane

Celebrating Martin Luther with the music of Bach, Mendelssohn, and Schütz

Free and open to the public.

Dean’s Research and Creative Activity Forum

Summer in Colombia: Community and Connections
Greg Gordon, Katey Roden, Pavel Shlossberg, Rebecca Stephanis, Stacy Taninchev

Thursday, November 9, 2017
4:30 pm
Wolff Auditorium
Gonzaga University

Colombia’s peace accords suggest a beginning of the end to the longest ongoing armed conflict in the Americas. In addition to demilitarization, the accords offer an avenue for community and national reconciliation around cultural, economic, and environmental concerns. Join Greg Gordon, Rebecca Stephanis, Stacy Taninchev, Katey Roden, and Pavel Shlossberg as they discuss their experiences living, teaching, and conducting research in Cali, Colombia as part of the College of Arts & Sciences’ burgeoning relationship with our sister Jesuit institution, the Pontifica Universidad Javeriana. They will share what they’ve learned about Colombian film and literature, the politics of coffee, environmental issues and land use conflicts, as well as participatory communication and alternative media in community activism and peace building.

Austin Hagel Senior Guitar Recital

Saturday, November 11, 2017
2:00 pm
University Chapel
Gonzaga University

Free and open to the public.

Department of Music

Chamber Recital for Cello, Violin, and Piano
Featuring Kevin Hekmatpanah, Denise Dillenbeck, and John Picket

Sunday, November 12, 2017
2:00 pm
University Chapel
Gonzaga University

Faure Violin Sonata
Tchaikovsky Piano Trio

Free and open to the public.

Department of Music

Jazz Combos 3 & 4

Friday, November 17, 2017
4:30 pm
Music Annex
Gonzaga University

Free and open to the public.

Department of Music

Wind Ensemble
With Ross Holcombe, trombone

Sunday, November 19, 2017
3:00 pm
Hemmingson Center Ballroom
Gonzaga University

Free and open to the public.

Department of Music

Jazz Christmas Concert
Music by Duke Ellington and Vince Guaraldi

Thursday, November 30, 2017
7:00 pm
Hemmingson Center Ballroom
Gonzaga University

Free and open to the public.

December

Department of Theatre & Dance

Gonzaga Repertory Dance Company and Dr. Brook Swanson
Beautiful Weapons: the diversity of life

Friday, December 1, 2017
12:00 pm
Magnuson Theatre

Gonzaga University

A scientific presentation using the language of dance.

Department of Theatre & Dance

Boone Street Hooligans #11

Friday, December 1, 2017
7:30 pm
Saturday, December 2, 2017
2:00 pm
Magnuson Theatre
Gonzaga University

The all student-written, performed sketch comedy group, Boone Street Hooligans, takes the stage for their Fall show. Directed by Nathan Patrick Nelson and Olivia Roberts.

Proceeds from ticket sales support Cup of Cool Water, a local non-profit organization benefiting homeless youth.

Tickets $2. All seats at the door.

Department of Theatre & Dance

Boundless Winter Showcase

Sunday, December 3, 2017
7:30 pm
Magnuson Theatre
Gonzaga University

The all-student choreographed and performed dance club welcomes you to their annual December show.

Proceeds from ticket sales support the Gonzaga Dance Marathon, which benefits local juvenile cancer research.

Tickets $2. All seats at the door.

Department of Music

Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra
With Itamar Zorman, Violin

Monday, December 4, 2017
7:30 pm
Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox

Beethoven Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92
Dvořák Violin Concerto in A Major, Ap. 53

Tickets $12 – $15, free with an active Gonzaga University ID. Tickets available here.

Department of Theatre & Dance

Short Scenes: Directing I Showcase

Friday, December 8, 2017
7:30 pm
Magnuson Theatre

Gonzaga University

Advised by Charles M. Pepiton, Directing I students showcase short scenes featuring student actors.

Department of Music

Annual Candlelight Christmas Concert
Concert Choir, Women’s Chorus, Men’s Chorus Spokane Brass Quintet,
Gonzaga Brass Choir

Friday, December 8, 2017
7:30 pm
Saturday, December 9, 2017
2:00 pm
St. Aloysius Catholic Church

Gonzaga University

Tickets $10 – $25, free for children and with an active Gonzaga University ID.

Tickets will be available here.