Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineering is the profession that applies mathematics, the basic sciences, technology, and problem-solving skills to the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of electrical and electronic products, equipment, services, and information systems. Electrical engineers find innovative ways to use electricity, information, computers, and electronics to make people's lives better. Traditionally, electrical engineering involves the areas of communication systems, computer systems, control systems, electric power systems, electronics, and signal processing.

Communication systems process and transfer information from one point to another. This information includes audio and video data, as well as digital data used in computers. Computer systems includes computer design, as well as the areas of hardware and software used to control processes and equipment. Control systems use electronic circuits to regulate processes to meet specific objectives and requirements. Electric power systems generate, transmit, and distribute electricity to residential, commercial, and industrial establishments. Electronics engineers design and develop devices, components, and circuits that are used in computers, appliances, automobiles, and countless other areas. Signal processing systems transform electrical and electromagnetic signals to more usable form in such applications as computerized tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

The department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in conjunction with its various constituencies, has clearly defined program objectives. These engineering program objectives are listed in the School of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalogue.

The SEAS core curriculum represents a common body of knowledge. The engineering programs core consists of fifty-three credits which are common to and required of all engineering degree programs in the school: the first thirty-two credits (of which there is a more complete description in the General Degree Requirements and Procedures section of this catalogue) form the University core requirement while the remaining twenty-one credits are required by engineering degree programs.

All undergraduate students are subject to the provisions of this core; transfer students, however, should consult the General Degree Requirements and Procedures section of this catalogue for possible modifications to the philosophy and religious studies requirements listed below. Substitutions for discontinued courses are required and authorized by the proper University authorities. The University and School core requirements are grouped into the following categories.

University requirements
  1. Thought and Expression (7 credits): ENGL 101, SPCO 101, and PHIL 101 (preferably taken in the same semester).
  2. Philosophy (9 credits): PHIL 201, PHIL 301, and PHIL 400 level elective.
  3. Religious Studies (9 credits): RELI 100, RELI 200, and RELI 300 levels: one elective from each level.
  4. Mathematics (4 credits): one MATH (not CPSC) course at the 100 level or above: engineering students must use MATH 157.
  5. English Literature (3 credits): ENGL 102, ENGL 103H, ENGL 105 or ENGL 106.
Engineering program specific:
  1. Mathematics (11 credits): MATH 258, MATH 259, MATH 260.
  2. Physics (4 credits): PHYS 103, PHYS 103L.
  3. Chemistry (4 credits): CHEM 101, CHEM 101L.
Computer Science program specific:
  1. Mathematics (17 credits): MATH 157, MATH 231, MATH 258, 2 300/400 level electives.
  2. Lab Science (12 credits): Students are encouraged to take 16 credits.
  3. History (6 credits): see program description section.
  4. Fine Arts (3 credits): see program description section.
  5. Literature (3 credits): see program description section.
  6. Social Science (6 credits): see program description section.
  7. Foreign Language or Culture (3 credits): see program description section.
  8. Social Justice (3 credits): see program description section.