Civil Engineering

Chairperson: Paul Nowak (Associate Dean)
Professors: N. Bormann, S. Ganzerli, A. Khattak, P. Nowak (Associate Dean)
Associate Professor: S. Niezgoda
Assistant Professors: M. London, M. Muszynski

Civil engineers are problem solvers who often utilize sophisticated technologies to find solutions to a huge variety of the challenges facing society. A civil engineer plans, designs and supervises construction of numerous infrastructure facilities required by modern society. These facilities exist in both the public and private sectors, and vary in scope and size. Examples of civil engineering projects include space satellites and launching structures, offshore drilling platforms, bridges, highways, buildings, transportation systems, dams, irrigation systems, water supply and treatment systems, wastewater collection and treatment systems, flood control facilities, solid and hazardous waste management, and environmental restoration. Civil engineers have important roles in analysis, design, management, regulatory enforcement, and policy development. To participate effectively in this broad scope of activities, civil engineers acquire technical and problem solving skills, and the ability to communicate clearly and effectively. Students completing the requirements for a degree in civil engineering have a choice of technical electives from four areas: Environmental Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering, Structural Engineering, and Water Resources Engineering.

The department of Civil Engineering, in conjunction with its various constituencies, has clearly defined program objectives. These engineering program objectives are listed in the School of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalogue, and by the Gonzaga University Mission Statement that may be found at the beginning of the catalogue.

The SEAS core curriculum represents a common body of knowledge. The engineering programs core consists of fifty-three credits which are common to and required of all engineering degree programs in the school: the first thirty-two credits (of which there is a more complete description in the General Degree Requirements and Procedures section of this catalogue) form the University core requirement while the remaining twenty-one credits are required by engineering degree programs.

All undergraduate students are subject to the provisions of this core; transfer students, however, should consult the General Degree Requirements and Procedures section of this catalogue for possible modifications to the philosophy and religious studies requirements listed below. Substitutions for discontinued courses are required and authorized by the proper University authorities. The University and School core requirements are grouped into the following categories.

University requirements
  1. Thought and Expression (7 credits): ENGL 101, SPCO 101, and PHIL 101 (preferably taken in the same semester).
  2. Philosophy (9 credits): PHIL 201, PHIL 301, and PHIL 400 level elective.
  3. Religious Studies (9 credits): RELI 100, RELI 200, and RELI 300 levels: one elective from each level.
  4. Mathematics (4 credits): one MATH (not CPSC) course at the 100 level or above: engineering students must use MATH 157.
  5. English Literature (3 credits): ENGL 102, ENGL 103H, ENGL 105 or ENGL 106.
Engineering program specific:
  1. Mathematics (11 credits): MATH 258, MATH 259, MATH 260.
  2. Physics (4 credits): PHYS 103, PHYS 103L.
  3. Chemistry (4 credits): CHEM 101, CHEM 101L.
Computer Science program specific:
  1. Mathematics (17 credits): MATH 157, MATH 231, MATH 258, 2 300/400 level electives.
  2. Lab Science (12 credits): Students are encouraged to take 16 credits.
  3. History (6 credits): see program description section.
  4. Fine Arts (3 credits): see program description section.
  5. Literature (3 credits): see program description section.
  6. Social Science (6 credits): see program description section.
  7. Foreign Language or Culture (3 credits): see program description section.
  8. Social Justice (3 credits): see program description section.