History

Chairperson: Kevin Chambers
Professors: R. Carriker, E. Downey, J.R. Stackelberg (Emeritus), A. Via, S.J.
Associate Professors: S. Balzarini, K. Chambers, E. Cunningham, R. DeAragon, R. Donnelly, A. Goldman, M. Maher, S.J., T. Nitz, K. O’Connor
Assistant Professors: A. Ostendorf

The Department of History offers a variety of courses that enable students to fulfill the core requirements of their schools as well as to obtain a Bachelor of Arts with either a major or a minor in History. The goals of the department curriculum are to engender an informed, critical, and articulate sense of the past, an appreciation for the diversity of human experience, and an awareness of the role of tradition in shaping the present. The major develops a variety of practical research and communication skills and provides a foundation for graduate work, the study of law, teaching, archival and library sciences, and many careers in business and the professions. The department sponsors a chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the international History honor society.

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences should complete their core requirement in History by taking HIST 101 and either HIST 102 or HIST 112 in their first year. HIST 201 or 202 may be substituted for one 100-level course after the student has completed the freshman year.

Majors are required to complete HIST 301 (Historical Methods), which is normally taken as the student begins the upper division courses. Majors are also required to take HIST 401 (Senior Seminar). In exceptional cases students with an honors level grade point average and with approval of the department may elect to take HIST 499 (Senior Thesis) in lieu of HIST 401. Upper division electives must include one course from four topic areas.  Majors who wish to obtain teacher certification are urged to confer with the School of Education as well as their departmental adviser.



B.A. Major in History: 33 Credits
Lower Division
HIST 101 Survey of Western Civilization I 3 credits
One of the following two courses:
   HIST 102 Survey of Western Civilization II
   HIST 112 Survey of World Civilization
3 credits
HIST 201 History of U.S.A. I 3 credits
HIST 202 History of U.S.A. II 3 credits
Upper Division
HIST 301 Historical Methods
  (Chair's approval necessary to fulfill a subject area requirement for majors. May only be taken once.)
3 credits
HIST Electives
   (a maximum of six credits from HIST 219-299 may be used to satisfy this requirement)
18-21 credits
One of the following two courses:
   HIST 401 Research Seminar 3 credits
   HIST 499 Honors Thesis 0 credit

HIST electives must include one course in each of the following areas:
1) Non-Western or Developing Areas:
   HIST 274 China Past and Present
   HIST 275 Japan Past and Present
   HIST 301 Historical Methods*
   HIST 348 Islamic Civilization
   HIST 349 History of the Modern Middle East
   HIST 370 Foundations of East Asian Civilization
   HIST 374 Maoist China
   HIST 375 Modern East Asian Civilization
   HIST 376 Tokugawa Japan
   HIST 378 Zen, Modernity and the Counterculture
   HIST 380 Colonial Latin America
   HIST 381 Modern Latin America
   HIST 382 Revolutions in Modern Latin America
   HIST 383 Mexico
   HIST 384 Women in Colonial Latin America
2) Pre-Modern Europe:
   HIST 219 Sex and Gender in European History
   HIST 301 Historical Methods*
   HIST 302 The Ancient City
   HIST 303 Athens in the 5th Century B.C.
   HIST 304 Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World
   HIST 305 The Roman Republic
   HIST 306 The Roman Empire
   HIST 307 The Archaeology of Greece and Rome
   HIST 308 The Archaeology of Ancient Rome
   HIST 310 Early Medieval Europe
   HIST 311 Medieval Europe
   HIST 312 Renaissance Europe
   HIST 313 The Reformation
   HIST 314 High Medieval Europe
   HIST 315 Medieval Britain
   HIST 316 Tudor and Stuart Britain
   HIST 318 The Age of Absolutism
   HIST 320 Jesuit History
3) Modern European:
   HIST 301 Historical Methods*
   HIST 321 Age of the French Revolution
   HIST 323 Europe in the 19th Century
   HIST 324 Church and State in the Making of Italy
   HIST 325 World War I 1914-1918
   HIST 326 Europe 1918-1939
   HIST 327 Europe-U.S. Relations Since WWII
   HIST 328 19th Century Germany
   HIST 329 Hitler’s Germany
   HIST 330 The Holocaust
   HIST 331 World War II
   HIST 332 Modern Britain
   HIST 333 Tsarist Russia
   HIST 334 Russia and the U.S.S.R. Since 1945
   HIST 335 Eastern Europe Since 1863
   HIST 337 The Stalin Era
   HIST 338 Fascist Italy
   HIST 339 Italy and Europe after WWII
   HIST 340 The Cold War
4) U.S. History:
   HIST 301 Historical Methods*
   HIST 340 The Cold War
   HIST 350 The City in American History
   HIST 351 Coming to America
   HIST 352 U.S. in the Era of Jefferson and Jackson
   HIST 353 U.S. in the Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction
   HIST 354 North American Exploration
   HIST 355 The American West
   HIST 356 The Age of Theodore Roosevelt
   HIST 357 The Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt
   HIST 358 African-American History
   HIST 359 America: Invasion to Rebellion
   HIST 360 Pacific Northwest History
   HIST 361 Post-World War II Presidency
   HIST 362 U.S. Since 1945
   HIST 363 Women in United States History
   HIST 364 Public History/History in Public
   HIST 365 Intro to Native American History
   HIST 366 America Culture and Ideas

   * Chair's approval necessary to fulfill a subject area requirement for majors. May only be taken once.


Minor in History: 18 Credits
Lower Division
HIST 101 Survey of Western Civilization I 3 credits
One of the following two courses:
   HIST 102 Survey of Western Civilization II
   HIST 112 Survey of World Civilization 1500-Present
3 credits
Upper Division
HIST Electives
   (a maximum of six credits from HIST 219-299 may be used to satisfy this requirement)
12 credits


The core curriculum or common body of knowledge of the College of Arts and Sciences consists of 59 to 62 credits which are common to and required of all degree programs in the College: the first 31 credits (of which there is a more complete description in the General Degree Requirements and Procedures section of this catalogue) form the University Core, while the remaining 28 to 31 credits are common to all Arts and Sciences degrees.
Students should attempt to spread the core curriculum over their entire fours years at Gonzaga.

  1. Thought and Expression (7 credits): ENGL 101, SPCO 101, and PHIL 101 (preferably in the same semester).
  2. Philosophy (9 credits): PHIL 201, PHIL 301, and  PHIL  400 level elective.
  3. Religious Studies (9 credits): RELI 100, 200, and 300 levels: one course from each level.
  4. Mathematics (3 credits): one MATH (not CPSC) course on the 100 level or above; NURS 320 is substituted for a MATH course for BSN students; MATH 203 fulfills this requirement only for students who graduate with certification in Elementary Education.
  5. English Literature (3 credits): ENGL 102 or 103H or 105 or 106.
  6. History (6 credits): HIST 101 and either HIST 102 or HIST 112 in their first year. If they are unable to complete all six 100-level HIST credits in their first year, HIST 201 or 202 may be substituted for one 100-level course after the first year.
  7. Fine Arts (3 credits): one course in either VART, MUSC, or THEA from courses approved by Dean of Arts and Sciences.
  8. Laboratory Science (4 credits): one course with laboratory in either BIOL, CHEM, or PHYS.
  9. Mathematics or Natural Science (3 credits): one course in either MATH, CPSC, BIOL, CHEM, PHYS, or ITEC.
  10. Literature (3 credits): one British or American literature course (ENGL 201 - 285).
  11. Social Science (6 credits): CRIM 101, ECON, SOCI, POLS, or PSYC: two courses from these departments.
  12. Foreign Language or Culture (3 credits): one course in any foreign language (classical or modern) or one (foreign culture) course approved by the Dean of Arts and Sciences.  Foreign-language speaking students from foreign cultures who have completed the nine English core credits at Gonzaga prior to their fourth year (last thirty credits) may petition the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences for a waiver of the foreign language or Culture requirement..
  13. Social Justice (3 credits): One course on Social Justice issues related to experiences of difference (like race, class, gender, ethnicity or sexual orientation), from courses approved by the Dean of Arts & Sciences; (may be combined with other core or major requirements).