Courses


HIST 101 Survey of Westrn Civilizatn I 3.00 credits
A survey of the origins of western civilization in the Near East; classical Greek and Roman civilizations; and developments in Europe to 1648.
 
Equivalent: WOMS 271C - Taken before Summer 2 2009
HIST 101H Survy Westrn Civilztn I Honors 3.00 credits
For Honors students only. A survey of the origins of western civilization in the Near East; Greek and Roman civilizations; and developments in Europe to 1648.
 
Prerequisite: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 102 Survey of Westrn Civilizatn II 3.00 credits
A survey of European history from the seventeenth century to the present with emphasis on ideas, politics, and social changes.
 
HIST 102H Srvy Westrn Civilztn II Honors 3.00 credits
For Honors students only. A survey of European history from the seventeenth century to the present with emphasis on ideas, politics, and social changes.
 
Prerequisite: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 112 World Civilization 1500-Pres 3.00 credits
A survey of world civilization from the 16th century to the present with an emphasis on the different civilizations of the world and their interactions.
 
HIST 112H World Civilization 1500-Pres 3.00 credits
A survey of world civilization from the 16th century to the present with an emphasis on the different civilizations of the world and their interactions.
 
Prerequisite: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 190 Directed Study 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
 
HIST 201 History of the US I 3.00 credits
This is a survey of the United States from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War. Topics include the development of the colonies, their interaction with Native Americans, the revolution of the colonies, the establishment of the Constitution, westward expansion, cultural development, early reform movements, slavery and the Civil War.
 
HIST 201H History of US I Honors 3.00 credits
For Honors students, see HIST 201.
 
Prerequisite: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 202 History of the US II 3.00 credits
This is a survey of events after the Civil War that have shaped the present United States and its world roles. Emphasis is on the Reconstruction period, the Gilded Age, the rise of industry, and American overseas expansion. Moving into the 20th century, the course focuses on Progressive Era reform, the Great Depression, the World Wars, and domestic and foreign policy after 1945, particularly civil rights, social policies, and the Cold War.
 
HIST 202H History of the US II Honors 3.00 credits
For Honors students, see HIST 202.
 
Prerequisite: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 206 Washington History 1.00 credit
This course is intended for students working towards teacher certification.
 
HIST 210 Indians of Columbia Plateau 3.00 credits
This course will explore Native American groups on the Columbia Plateau, including their traditional lifestyles, traditional and colonial religions, the Salish language, and responses to settlement and government policies. We will also examine the traditions of cooperation and collaboration among these groups. We must understand the geography of the Plateau, in order to fully contextualize the importance of homeland and traditional practices, so this course represents place-based study of Native American history. Spring.
 
HIST 219 Sex & Gender in Westrn History 3.00 credits
An introduction to ideas about gender, sex, and the family in western culture, and women's experiences of and contributions to civilizations in the Mediterranean region and western Europe, from ancient times to the early modern period (circa 1600).
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 270 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 274 China Past and Present 3.00 credits
This course is a focused survey of Chinese history from the Shang Dynasty (c. 1600 B.C.) up to the present. Using the standard interpretive categories of politics, economics, society, and culture, the course will explore such topics as pre-imperial China; the Qin-Han consolidations and breakdowns; pre-modern Imperial China (Jin, Sui, Tang, Song, including inter-dynasty kingdoms); the Mongol (Yuan) dynasty; early modern and modern imperial China (Ming and Qing); and the Revolutionary periods of the twentieth century, including the Guomindang era, Maoism, and Post-Mao modernizations. Students who take this course for International Studies credit will be required to do an extra writing assignment that integrates the material of this course with their international studies focus. It is desired but not required that students will have taken History 112 (World Civilizations Since 1500) prior to taking this course. Students who take this class as a history course may not use or substitute the credits for International Studies.
 
HIST 275 Japan Past and Present 3.00 credits
This course is a focused survey of Japanese history from the Jomon Period (c. 14,000 B.C) up to the present. Using the standard interpretive categories of politics, economics, society, and culture, the course will explore such topics as the Jomon and Yayoi classical ages; the Yamato, Nara, and Heian aristocratic ages; the Kamakura, Ashikaga, and Tokugawa warrior ages, and the modern period from the Meiji Restoration through the twentieth century. Students who take this course for International Studies credit will be required to do an extra writing assignment that integrates the material of this course with their International Studies focus. It is desired but not required that students will have taken History 112 (World Civilizations Since 1500) prior to taking this course. Students who take this class as History course may not use or substitute the credits for International Studies.
 
HIST 301 Historical Methods 3.00 credits
An in-depth introduction to the discipline of History. While subject matter varies by professor and semester, all sections will have in common the following topics: the history and philosophies of History; varieties of historical evidence (oral, archaeological, documentary); mechanics of historical writing; introduction to various interpretive frameworks and theories, with an emphasis on contemporary methods and issues. Students will complete library research and writing projects, demonstrate understanding of historical prose, citation, analysis and interpretation. Each 301 course is based on specific areas of study and therefore may be counted as a course that fulfills one of the four content areas required for the history major. It is highly recommended that this course be taken in the sophomore year in preparation for upper-division coursework.
 
HIST 302 Ancient City 3.00 credits
This course is a survey of the development of the city in the ancient world. Students will explore urban forms and processes as they are shaped by - and as they shape - their social, cultural, economic and physical contexts. The course will focus on representative urban centers of the ancient Near East, Egypt, and the Mediterranean world, tracing the evolution of ancient urbanism from the Near East to the classical worlds of Greece and Rome.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D
HIST 303 Athens in the 5th Century BC 3.00 credits
The history of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age through the end of the fifth century BC, with special emphasis on the city of Athens and its political, social, and economic landscape during Classical Greece.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D
HIST 304 Alexander Grt and Hellen Wrld 3.00 credits
The political, social, and cultural history of Greece and the Hellenistic World from 399 to 30 BC, from the death of Socrates to the death of Cleopatra. The course will focus particularly on the rise of Macedon as a Mediterranean power, the achievements of Alexander the Great, and the transformation of the eastern Mediterranean under the monarchies of the Hellenistic Period.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D
HIST 305 The Roman Republic 3.00 credits
The political, social and cultural history of Republican Rome from its legendary origins to the Battle of Actium and its de facto end in 31 BC. The course will focus closely on the factors leading to the Republic's successful rise as uncontested Mediterranean ruler as well as the internal political and social conflicts that brought the Republic crashing down to its ultimate fall. (Also generally offered through the Gonzaga-in-Florence program on an irregular basis.)
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: ITAL 363 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 306 The Roman Empire 3.00 credits
The political, social and cultural history of Rome during the age of the Emperors, from Augustus' creation of the Principate in 27 BC to the decline of the Roman Empire in the west by the 5th century AD. Special focus in this course will be given to the workings of the Imperial system, daily life in Rome and the provinces, the rise of Christianity and the ultimate transformation of the empire.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: ITAL 364 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 307 Archaeology of Ancient Greece 3.00 credits
This course examines the techniques and methods of Classical Archaeology as revealed through an examination of the major monuments and artifacts of Ancient Greece and its neighbors. Architecture, sculpture, vase and fresco painting, and the minor arts are all examined, from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. We consider the nature of this archaeological evidence, and the relationship of classical archaeology to other disciplines such as history, art history, and the classical languages.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D
HIST 308 Archaeology of Ancient Rome 3.00 credits
This course examines the techniques and methods of classical archaeology as revealed through an examination of the major monuments and artifacts of ancient Rome and its neighbors. Architecture, sculpture, vase and fresco painting, and the minor arts are all examined, from the Early Iron Age through the Late Roman period. We consider the nature of this archaeological evidence, and the relationship of classical archaeology to other disciplines such as history, art history, and the classical languages.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D
HIST 310 Early Medieval Europe 3.00 credits
A study of the period from Constantine to the mid-eleventh century, the Investiture Controversy. Emphasis will be placed on the social, economic, and political decline of Rome, the reign of Justinian, the era of Charlemagne, the origin of feudalism and the feudal kingdoms.
 
HIST 311 Medieval Europe 3.00 credits
Developments in the first flowering of Western European civilization, C.A.D. 500-1350, including feudalism, the rise of representative assemblies, the commercial revolution and the papal monarchy. Florence campus only.
 
Equivalent: ITAL 366 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 312 Renaissance Europe 3.00 credits
A history of western Europe circa 1350-1550, examining the political, religious, social, and economic context for the cultural achievements of the humanists, artists, dramatists, scientists, architects, and educators of the age of Joan of Arc, Michelangelo, and the Tudors and the Medici.
 
Equivalent: ITAL 367 - Successful completion
HIST 313 The Reformation 3.00 credits
The figures, ideas, and events that produced the religious upheaval and disruption of medieval Christendom in the sixteenth century.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D
HIST 314 High Medieval Europe 3.00 credits
A survey of western European civilization circa 1000-1350, the era which saw the birth of universities, nation-states, parliamentary assemblies, the Crusades, chivalry, and Gothic architecture. The course will examine political, social, cultural, economic, and religious developments.
 
HIST 315 Medieval Britain 3.00 credits
A survey of the political, religious, social, and cultural history of the British Isles, circa 100-1485, examining Celtic, Roman, Anglo-Saxon, Viking, Norman, and Plantagenet interactions. Topics will include Christianization, the Viking and Norman invasions, Magna Carta and Parliament; relations of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland.
 
HIST 316 Tudor & Stuart Britain 3.00 credits
British religious, political, social, cultural, and economic developments from the late 1400s to 1689, including the Wars of the Roses, the English Renaissance and Reformation, the Civil War and Restoration, and the Revolution of 1688.
 
HIST 318 The Age of Absolutism 3.00 credits
This course will serve as a bridge between the courses offered in the Renaissance and Reformation and those that study the French Revolution and the 19th century (1550-1800). Attention will be paid to the growth of the absolutist state, the emergence and capitalism and its structures, and the important intellectual ideas and conflicts which arose, particularly those dealing with matters of religious and state authority and the intellectual discussion between religion and science.
 
HIST 320 Jesuit History 3.00 credits
This course will examine the context for the founding of the Society of Jesus and trace its history from its beginning to its temporary suppression in 1773. Although the course will have as its focus the Society of Jesus in Europe, it will also examine how the order encountered various cultures in the New World, Asia, India, and Africa. This course will examine the Society of Jesus against the backdrop of the developing absolutist states and its encounter with the Enlightenment.
 
HIST 321 Age of the French Revolution 3.00 credits
The political, social, intellectual, and religious history of Europe from the eighteenth century to 1815, including the Enlightenment, the fall of the ancient regime, the French Revolution, and Napoleon.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: FREN 347 - OK if taken since Fall 2011
HIST 321 Age of the French Revolution 3.00 credits
The political, social, intellectual, and religious history of Europe from the eighteenth century to 1815, including the Enlightenment, the fall of the ancient regime, the French Revolution, and Napoleon.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 383 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 323 Europe in the 19th Century 3.00 credits
This course will examine the social and political history of Europe from the end of the Napoleonic era (1815) to the beginning of the First World War (1914). Special attention will be paid to those attitudes and structures which continue to play an important role in contemporary society such as industrialization, social revolutions, communism, socialism, women's movements, consumerism, racism, eugenics, nationalism, Church-State conflicts and the development of the middle class as an operative agent in government. This course will also examine how the arts both reflected these changes and acted as instruments of change within society.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 386 - Successful completion
HIST 324 Church &State: Making of Italy 3.00 credits
The social and political history of Italy from the Congress of Vienna (1815) to the outbreak of the First World War (1914).
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 380 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 325 World War I 1914-1918 3.00 credits
A history of Europe and the world's involvement in the Great War from 1914-1918. The course will discuss the origins, conduct and consequences of World War I. Arguably the pivotal event of the modern age, World War I set the stage for the "century of violence." The nature of war and Western civilization changed on the battlefields of the First World War. These themes will be explored in the course.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 326 Europe 1918-1939 3.00 credits
A history of Europe from the end of the Great War to the beginning of the Second World War. This course will include the impact of World War I, the postwar peace settlements, the social, political, intellectual and economic disruption of the war, the rise of fascism, the Great Depression, Hitler and National Socialism, and the origins of World War II
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 387 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 327 Europe-US Relations After WWII 3.00 credits
A detailed analysis of the development of U.S.-Western European relations since World War II. Florence campus only.
 
HIST 328 19th Century Germany 3.00 credits
This course examines the history of the German states from the end of the Napoleonic era to the end of the First World War. Issues to be explored include German nationalism and liberalism, the revolutions of 1848-1849, the rise of Prussia and the formation of the German Empire, and the development of political and social institutions during the imperial period.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 388 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 329 Hitler's Germany 3.00 credits
German history from 1918 to 1945. The causes, characteristics, and consequences of Nazi rule.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 397 - Successful completion
HIST 330 The Holocaust 3.00 credits
A history of the Nazi genocide of the Jews in World War II, including its origins and historical context, the methods used by the Nazis to identify and exterminate victims, a study of the perpetrators, the reaction of the international community, and post-war historiography, interpretation and commemoration.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: RELI 492B - Successful completion
HIST 331 World War II 3.00 credits
The causes, conduct and consequences of the Second World War.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 332 Modern Britain 3.00 credits
British history from 1688 to the present, emphasizing the reign of Victoria, industrialization and reform, imperialism, constitutional and colonial development, the conflict with Napoleon, the Irish Home Rule, the decline of liberalism and the rise of labor, the two world wars, and the postwar welfare state.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 398 - Successful completion
HIST 333 Tsarist Russia 3.00 credits
This course examines the major political, social, intellectual, and cultural developments in Russia from the Kievan Rus era through the Great Reforms of the mid-nineteenth century. Its major themes include the development of Russian autocratic traditions, Russian imperial expansion, and the growing tensions between state and society under the Romanovs.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 271C Minimum Grade: D or HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 334 Russia & USSR Since 1945 3.00 credits
This course may be considered an autopsy on the Soviet empire. Its themes include: "developed" socialism under Stalin's successors; the rise and decline of the Soviet economy; the Cold War; the Soviet Union's nationalities issues; the impact of Gorbachev's reforms; and the collapse of the USSR. The course will also consider the domestic and foreign policy challenges faced by Yeltsin and Putin after 1991.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 376 - Successful completion
HIST 335 Eastern Europe Since 1863 3.00 credits
This course surveys the major political developments in central, eastern, and southeastern Europe from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Its major themes include the collapse of the region's multinational empires, the creation of nation-states, World War II and the Holocaust, the Cold War, and the political challenges posed by democracy, nationalism, communism, and foreign domination.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 337 The Stalin Era 3.00 credits
This course focuses on the dictatorship of Josef Stalin from the late 1920s until his death in 1953. Its main topics include: Stalin's consolidation of personal rule; the impact of crash industrialization and agricultural collectivization; Stalinist terror; the Soviet experience in World War II; the worldwide influence of the Soviet model after the war; and the legacy of Stalinism in Russia.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 338 Fascist Italy 3.00 credits
Italian history from 1918 to 1945, including an examination of social and economic conditions in post-World War Italy, rise of the Fascist Party, the role of Benito Mussolini, the nature of Fascist government in Italy, Italian imperialism under Mussolini, and the part played by Italy as an ally with Hitler's Germany. Generally offered through the Gonzaga-in-Florence program on an intermittent basis.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 391 - Successful completion
HIST 339 Italy & Europe after WWII 3.00 credits
The transformation of Italian political institutions and society after the defeat of the Fascist government at the end of the Second World War, the continuing evolution of Italy during the Cold War and post-Cold War eras, and Italy's role in post-war Europe(including NATO, the European Economic Community, and the establishment of the European Union). Generally offered through the Gonzaga-in-Florence program on an intermittent basis.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 379 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 340 The Cold War 3.00 credits
The focus of this course is the ideological and geopolitical confrontation between the superpowers that shaped the second half of the twentieth century. The course analyzes the origins of the Cold War, its global manifestations in Europe and the "Third World," as well as the effects of the Cold War on American and Soviet societies and cultures.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 202 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 346 Europe and World Since 1945 3.00 credits
World affairs since the end of World War II with special emphasis on the Cold War, North-South relations, wars in Indochina and the Mid-East, European integration, and the disintegration of the East bloc in 1989-1991.
 
Equivalent: INST 378 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
HIST 348 Islamic Civilization 3.00 credits
This course examines the history of Islam from the time of the Prophet Muhammad to the great Islamic gunpowder empires of the early modern period. Specific topics covered include the Quran, the practices and beliefs of the faith, and an examination of the intersection between faith and culture. The course also includes an introduction to key issues related to Islam in the contemporary world.
 
Equivalent: INST 368 - Successful completion
HIST 348 Islamic Civilization 3.00 credits
This course examines the history of Islam from the time of the Prophet Muhammad to the great Islamic gunpowder empires of the early modern period. Specific topics covered include the Quran, the practices and beliefs of the faith, and an examination of the intersection between faith and culture. The course also includes an introduction to key issues related to Islam in the contemporary world.
 
Equivalent: RELI 354 - Successful completion
HIST 348 Islamic Civilization 3.00 credits
This course examines the history of Islam from the time of the Prophet Muhammad to the great Islamic gunpowder empires of the early modern period. Specific topics covered include the Quran, the practices and beliefs of the faith, and an examination of the intersection between faith and culture. The course also includes an introduction to key issues related to Islam in the contemporary world.
 
Equivalent: RELI 492E - Taken before Summer 2014
HIST 349 History of Modern Middle East 3.00 credits
The development of the Middle East from the middle of the nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. Topics covered include the end of the Ottoman and Qajar Empires, the creation of the contemporary states of the Middle East at the end of World War I, and their history from 1920 through the end of the twentieth century.
 
Equivalent: INST 371 - Successful completion
HIST 350 The City in American History 3.00 credits
How, when, and why did cities in America develop where they did? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? This course will explore these and other questions while emphasizing twentieth-century American cities. We will examine urban populations, city culture, crime, municipal politics, and sustainability.
 
Equivalent: INST 391 - OK if taken between Fall 2006 and Sum Doc 2007
HIST 351 Coming to America 3.00 credits
Immigration, race, and ethnicity in American History. We will discuss the factors that impelled our ancestors to leave the "Old Country" and the "New World" features that made it attractive. Where did they settle? How were they received? While considering ethnic identity, religion, assimilation, community, citizenship, work, gender, class, nativism, and exclusion, we will discover why it is important that we study not only our own roots, but also the background of others in this polyethnic nation.
 
HIST 352 The Early American Republic 3.00 credits
This course examines the critical period in the early American republic from the American Revolution until approximately 1850. Topics covered in this course include immigration, expansion, nationalism, conceptions of race and ethnicity, labor, slavery, gender, reform movements, industrializations, Native American issues and popular democracy and religion. All of these will considered in light of the processes by which the United States began to cohere as a nation both politically and culturally.
 
HIST 353 US Civil War & Reconstruction 3.00 credits
Although this class will center around the American Civil War (1861-1865), it will even more so be a history of the United States from approximately 1820 through 1880, in order to effectively place the war in its appropriate historical contexts of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the mid-nineteenth century. This course will examine the nature and creation of regional distinctiveness in the United States, the centrality of race and slavery to the nation, the causes of disunion, the nature and character of the Civil War which followed, the war's diverse effects on the whole American populous, the nation's attempt at reconstruction, and the war's legacies that still inform our nation today.
 
HIST 354 North American Exploration 3.00 credits
A biographical approach to individual, government and institutional exploration of the Trans-Mississippi West after 1800.
 
HIST 355 The American West 3.00 credits
An investigation into frontier American institutions and activities that have helped form the modern American character.
 
Equivalent: INST 379 - OK if taken between Spring 2007 and Sum Doc 2007
HIST 356 The Age of Theodore Roosevelt 3.00 credits
The United States from 1877 to 1914. Emphasis is on big business, agricultural crisis, labor strife, political reform, and the emergence of America as a world power. The period is studied through the career of Theodore Roosevelt.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 202 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 357 Age of Franklin D Roosevelt 3.00 credits
The United States from 1914-1945:Progressivism, the Jazz Age, the New Deal and World War II. The period is studied through the careers of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 202 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 358 African-American History 3.00 credits
A study of the experiences of African-Americans from the 1600s to the present, which will include the development of slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, African-Americans on the frontier, and the African-American experience in the 20th century.
 
HIST 359 America: Invasion to Rebellion 3.00 credits
This course will examine the process of colonization on the North American continent. Issues which will be considered include: the world views of the people who eventually lived together in North America, the retentions, borrowings and changes in cultures during colonization, the varied Native American responses to the diverse incoming Europeans and Africans the increasing commitment to racial slavery and the enslaved's responses to this, the wide array of assumptions European empires held toward this continent and colonization, and the relationship between the colonies and the empire.
 
Equivalent: INST 398 - Successful completion
HIST 360 Pacific Northwest History 3.00 credits
The social and political roots of the Pacific Northwest, from early exploration to the present, with a concentration on the people and places of Washington State.
 
HIST 361 Post-WWII Presidency 3.00 credits
The post-1945 presidency evolved and changed drastically as consequence of domestic and foreign events and ideology. We will examine the powers and limitations of the post-1945 U.S. presidents in both foreign and domestic affairs. We will assess their relationships with Congress, the American people, the press, and other nations, and we will explore presidential power, agenda, persuasion, secrecy, and character.
 
HIST 362 U.S. Since 1945 3.00 credits
The political ideologies, social movements, and cultural revolutions that emerged after World War II, as reactions to the Cold War, social injustice, and changes in ideals, have influenced our contemporary politics, society, and culture. By examining this period in U.S. History, we will be able to better understand some of the issues that are most important to us today. HIST 362 will survey the international conflict, great social movements, and popular culture of the decades since 1945.
 
HIST 363 Women in United States History 3.00 credits
Explores the history of American women from the colonial era to the present and investigates women’s economic and political lives and social contributions through suffrage, reform, Civil Rights, feminism, and more. The class also explores gender roles and the ways that race, class, politics, national origin, and the passage of time alter those expectations.
 
Equivalent: WGST 330 - OK if taken since Fall 2009
HIST 364 Public History 3.00 credits
Why are people drawn to the past? When they go searching for it, where do they go, and what do they find? What should they find? This course examines the practice and politics of “public history.” As we will see, public historians work as museum curators, historic preservationists, historic site interpreters, archivists, film consultants, writers, and editors. In these and other roles, public historians help individuals and organizations recognize, contend with, and learn from the complexities of the past. Through weekly readings, site visits, guest speakers, and hands-on project experience, this course will introduce students to the challenges and rewards that accompany engagement with - and employment within - the field of public history.
 
HIST 365 Intro to Native Am History 3.00 credits
This has three concentrations. The first focus is on the diversity of Native American tribes and tribal leadership. Secondly, the course seeks to review the political vocabulary used by federal officials to describe their policy decisions regarding Native Americans. Third, there is an examination of the enduring influence of Native Americans on American Civilization.
 
HIST 366 American Cultures and Ideas 3.00 credits
This course will examine American history through an exploration of its culture. Throughout this course we will work towards defining what culture is, how it shapes expectations and assumption, how it motivates human actions and interactions, and how it is bound by time and place. Each student’s ability to critically read cultural sources from an appropriately historical frame of reference will be tested in a variety of assignments, including weekly readings, writing assignments, and active class participation.
 
HIST 367 Citizenship in the U.S. 3.00 credits
This course explores the history of citizenship in the United States from its founding in the Revolutionary era to the present. We will examine how and why the rights and obligations of citizenship have changed over time. We will also consider philosophical and theoretical frameworks involved in building and in understanding citizenship. And, significantly, we will explore the ways that Americans worked to democratize institutions that treated citizens differently because of race, ethnicity, class, national origin, or gender. This course is geared towards students interested in history, law, politics, ethnic studies, women’s studies, and social movements.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 368 The U.S. in the World 3.00 credits
This course will introduce you to the history of the United States in its global context. In order to situate the United States within its world, this course explores the interconnections between domestic beliefs, national policy, and international events.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 102 Minimum Grade: D or HIST 112 Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 356 - OK if taken since Fall 2014
HIST 370 Fnd of East Asian Civilization 3.00 credits
This course seeks to give students an understanding of the history and culture of pre-modern China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. After exploring the historical roots of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism in China, students will examine the ways in which these foundational philosophies helped form social, cultural, and political institutions in China and its neighbors. Students will also focus attention on the historical emergence of the Chinese imperial system, and its greatest pre-modern exemplars, the Qin, Han and T'ang dynasties. Not limiting the focus to China alone, students will also explore how the concept of China as the "middle kingdom" influenced the language, religion and political developments in Japan and Korea, leading to an authentic "macro-culture" in East Asia. The course will finish with a discussion of samurai culture and an analysis of how the Mongol conquests of Central and East Asia transformed the region, taking students to the threshold of the early modern period in Asia. It is desired but not required that students take HIST 112 prior to HIST 370.
 
Equivalent: INST 384 - Successful completion
HIST 374 Maoist China 3.00 credits
This course is an in-depth study of China during the revolutionary twentieth century, focused upon the career of People's Republic of China Chairman Mao Zedong. In addition to analyzing the political, economic, social, and cultural developments of post-imperial China, the course takes a look at the theory of revolution, and examines China's historical development in the context of imperialism, post colonialism, and international Marxist revolution. It is desired but not required that students take HIST 112 prior to HIST 374.
 
HIST 375 Modern East Asian Civilization 3.00 credits
This course is a focused integrated survey of East Asian civilization since the Late Ming period of China (c. 1600 A.D.). Using the standard interpretive categories of politics, economics, society, and culture, the course will explore the historical inter-relationships between the rise of the Manchu (Qing) Dynasty and the unification of Japan; the historical inter-relationships between East Asian societies and western commercial expansion, including overseas missions to China and Japan; the explosion of western imperialism in the nineteenth century, including the Opium War and Taiping Rebellion; Japanese imperialism in China and Korea; the historical inter-relationships between Chinese communism and Japanese militarism; East Asia in the Cold War, and the pop-cultural influence on East Asia on the modern west. Students who take this course for International Studies credit will be required to do an extra writing assignment that integrates the material of this course with their International Studies focus. It is desired but not required that students will have taken History 112 (World Civilizations Since 1500) prior to taking this course.
 
Equivalent: INST 373 - OK if taken since Fall 2009
HIST 376 Tokugawa Japan 3.00 credits
This course is an in-depth study of Japan's "early modern" period, covering the years of the Tokugawa Shogunate (1603-1868). In addition to analyzing the political, economic, social, and cultural developments of Japan's centralized feudal period, the course takes a look at the theory of modernity and examines Japan's historical development in the context of modernization.
 
HIST 378 Zen Modernity & Counterculture 3.00 credits
This course is an in-depth of the historical relationship between modern Japanese Zen Buddhism and the American counter-culture of the post WWII period. Through readings and discussions of a number of religious, literary and historical works, the course explores the degree to which the modern "reinvention" of an ancient Japanese religious tradition has influenced, and continues to influence western popular culture.
 
HIST 380 Colonial Latin America 3.00 credits
A survey of colonial Latin America that examines the contact, conflict, and accommodation among Europeans. Native Americans, and Africans that shaped colonial Latin America.
 
Equivalent: INST 372 - Successful completion
HIST 381 Modern Latin America 3.00 credits
A general introduction to the history of the former colonies of Spain and Portugal in the Western Hemisphere. Topics include the rise of caudillos, rural developments, the emergence of liberal economic development, populism, banana republics, dictatorships, dirty wars, Marxist revolution, and contemporary predicaments.
 
Equivalent: INST 394 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 382 Revolutions in Mod Latin Amer 3.00 credits
This course examines the origins, emergence, process, and consequences of major Latin American social and political revolutions in the twentieth century. It will investigate a variety of types of revolutions including different urban and rural movements, as well as groups that sought radical change from high politics to the grass roots level.
 
Equivalent: INST 369 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 383 Mexico 3.00 credits
A survey of Mexican history from the Aztec wars to the present.
 
Equivalent: INST 377 - OK if taken since Fall 2007
HIST 384 Women in Colonial Latin Amer 3.00 credits
This course will investigate the lives of women in both the pre-contact and post-conquest societies. The first part of the course concentrates on the activities of women, and their role in society, among the Aztecs, Inca, and Pueblo civilizations. The course will follow with the study of their experiences after the Spanish Conquest. The final section of the course will cover the variety of women, ranging from wealthy Spanish women, established nuns, marginal mystics, Indian leaders, and African women, and their experiences in the Spanish colonies. In the class, students will learn about and discuss the various gender systems which operated in different periods, and how these systems shaped women's lives as women shaped the systems themselves.
 
Equivalent: INST 380 - Taken before Sum Doc 2007
HIST 384 Women in Colonial Latin Amer 3.00 credits
This course will investigate the lives of women in both the pre-contact and post-conquest societies. The first part of the course concentrates on the activities of women, and their role in society, among the Aztecs, Inca, and Pueblo civilizations. The course will follow with the study of their experiences after the Spanish Conquest. The final section of the course will cover the variety of women, ranging from wealthy Spanish women, established nuns, marginal mystics, Indian leaders, and African women, and their experiences in the Spanish colonies. In the class, students will learn about and discuss the various gender systems which operated in different periods, and how these systems shaped women's lives as women shaped the systems themselves.
 
Equivalent: WGST 331 - OK if taken since Fall 2009
HIST 390 Topics in History 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Selected historical topics of current and special interest.
 
HIST 391 Topics in History 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Selected historical topics of current and special interest.
 
HIST 392 Topics in History 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Selected historical topics of current and special interest.
 
HIST 393 Topics in History 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Selected historical topics of current and special interest.
 
HIST 394 Topics in History 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Selected historical topics of current and special interest.
 
HIST 395 Top in History (Study Abroad) 1.00 - 5.00 credits
Selected historical topics of current and special interest.
 
HIST 396 Topics in History 1.00 - 9.00 credits
Selected historical topics of current and special interest.
 
HIST 397 Internship 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Students will apply historical methods and analytical skills at a non-profit or for-profit site such as a museum, archive, preservation office, government office, or other research or historical site. May be repeated once. Instructor permission required to register.
 
HIST 398 Topics in History 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Selected historical topics of current and special interest.
 
HIST 399 Topics in History 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Selected historical topics of current and special interest.
 
HIST 401 Senior Thesis/Seminar 3.00 credits
The History capstone course, designed as a discussion seminar for majors. General discussion topics and assignments vary by instructor and term, but all will develop student understanding of the methods, historiography, and skills of contemporary historical practice. Students will demonstrate their mastery of the discipline in course discussion, assignments, peer review, and research of a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor to produce a thesis project using relevant primary and secondary sources.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 301 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 490 Directed Reading and Research 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
 
HIST 498 Advanced Historical Writing 1.00 credit
This course is designed for students who have taken HIST 301 and who wish to improve their historical and writing skills by continuing work on their research papers.
 
Prerequisite: HIST 301 Minimum Grade: D
HIST 499 Thesis .00 credits
In exceptional cases, this course may be taken in lieu of HIST 401 by students with honor-level grade point averages, course work, and the permission of the Department of History.