Course Catalog


PHIL 101 Critical Thinking 2.00 credits
The philosophy component of the Thought and Expression sequence. Focus on formal (syllogistic, propositional) and informal (fallacies, induction, etc.) logic. Fall and Spring.
 
PHIL 102H Critical Thinking - Honors 3.00 credits
The philosophy component of the Thought and Expression sequence for Honors students. Fall.
 
Prerequisite: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 201 Philosophy of Human Nature 3.00 credits
Philosophical study of human nature, the human condition, the meaning and value of human life, and the human relationship to ultimate reality, with attention to such issues as the nature and possible existence of the soul, the relation between body and mind, belief and knowledge, freedom vs. determinism, and the possibility of human immortality. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: (PHIL 101 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 102H Minimum Grade: D)
PHIL 201H Philosophy of Human Nature Hon 3.00 credits
Philosophical study of human nature, the human condition, the meaning and value of human life, and the human relationship to ultimate reality, with attention to such issues as the nature and possible existence of the soul, the relation between body and mind, belief and knowledge, freedom vs. determinism, and the possibility of human immortality. Fall. For Honors students.
 
Prerequisite: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D and (PHIL 102H Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 101 Minimum Grade: D) and PHIL 101 Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 280 Persons and Conduct 3.00 credits
Two basic dimensions of philosophical investigation are inquiry into the nature and meaning of our being human (the philosophy of human nature) and inquiry into the right life and conduct of a human being (ethics). This course undertakes these closely related investigations from a personalist perspective.
 
PHIL 301 Ethics 3.00 credits
A general theory of the goals of human life and the norms of moral behavior; the theory will be applied to several specific moral problems. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 201 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 201H Minimum Grade: D and PHIL 101 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 101H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 301H Ethics-Honors 3.00 credits
A general theory of the goals of human life and the norms of moral behavior; the theory will be applied to several specific moral problems. Spring.
 
Prerequisite: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D and (PHIL 201H Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 201 Minimum Grade: D)
PHIL 389 Ethics & Service Learning 1.00 credit
A service learning seminar that may be taken in conjunction with specified sections of PHIL 301. Students discuss and apply ways by which to communicate with Spokane-area youth (primarily middle- and high-school age) what they are learning about ethics and character.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 201 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 201H Minimum Grade: D
Concurrent: PHIL 301
PHIL 390 Medical Ethics Internship 3.00 credits
Through the internship, students will become familiar with the kinds of ethical issues that arise in a major medical facility such as Sacred Heart Medical Center and understand how those issues are addressed. Students will be asked to reflect on the difference between abstract, theoretical discussions of health care ethics and their concrete, particular manifestations in the lives of patients, families, and professional staff.
 
PHIL 391 Directed Study 1.00 - 6.00 credits
Topic to be decided by faculty.
 
PHIL 400 Philosophy Major Pro Seminar 3.00 credits
An introduction to the major topics in philosophy with a special emphasis on practice in philosophical writing. Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 401 History of Ancient Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey of major figures and developments in ancient Greek and Hellenistic philosophy from Thales to Plotinus, using texts in translation. Philosophy major or minor status or permission of Chair. Fall.
 
PHIL 402 Ancient-Medieval Philosophy 3.00 credits
A study of important philosophers in the ancient and medieval periods. This course is designed for non-majors and cannot count towards a philosophy major.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 237C Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 403 Contemp Ethical Theory 3.00 credits
This course will explore developments in ethical theory in the later twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 404 Creative Wrting and Philosophy 3.00 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to writing about the philosophical questions that confront the thinking individual, to the practical application of philosophical thought to situations, problems and issues encountered in daily experiences and to make philosophical thought a real part of life. Issues discussed may include human nature, personal identity, love, death and virtue.
 
Prerequisite: (PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D) and ENGL 202 Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 405 History of Medieval Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey of the major philosophical movements in the Latin, Greek, and Arabic traditions from the seventh to the fourteenth centuries. Spring.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 401 Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 406 Philosophy of St Augustine 3.00 credits
A survey of St. Augustine's philosophy of God and the universe with special attention to Augustine's pivotal role in summing up Greek and Roman thought and laying the foundation for Medieval thought.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 407 St. Thomas Aquinas 3.00 credits
Life, works, and selected texts and problems.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 409 Social Justice 3.00 credits
This course will critically consider famous theories of justice, as well as their applications to some social and moral problems.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 410 History of Modern Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey from Descartes through Hegel. Philosophy majors are strongly urged to take this course only after completing PHIL 401 and PHIL 405. Fall.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 411 Philosophy of Language 3.00 credits
This course is primarily concerned with problems about the origin, nature, function, and uses of language in its relation to ideas in language users’ minds and the things in the world that the users inhabit. Readings will cover both the analytic and continental traditions and both Western and Eastern thinkers.
 
PHIL 412 Modern-Contemporary Philosophy 3.00 credits
A study of important philosophers in the modern and contemporary periods. Course is designed for non-majors and cannot count towards a Philosophy Major.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 413 Philosophy of Mysticism 3.00 credits
What is mysticism? Is there a common element in all forms of mysticism? What is the connection between mysticism and mental health/disease? What is the relationship between mysticism and the paranormal?
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 416 Marxism 3.00 credits
Some major writings of Marx, the social and intellectual history of Marxism, the relationship between Marxist theory and revolutionary practice, and contemporary problems in Marxism.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 417 C.S. Lewis 3.00 credits
This course examines Lewis, the Christian intellectual, as his participation in the Christian theistic tradition and his philosophical training exhibit themselves in his fictional, philosophical and theological works.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 418 Walker Percy 3.00 credits
This course examines both fiction and non-fiction works by Walker Percy (1916-1990), with particular emphasis on his development of existential themes and C.S. Peirce's semiotics. We investigate Peter Augustine Lawler's description of Percy as a proponent of "postmodernism rightly understood."
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 419 Happiness 3.00 credits
In one form or another, the nature of happiness has always been a central concern of philosophical reflection. In recent years, a new body of psychological research has made interesting contributions to our understanding of happiness. Specifically, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's work on 'flow' and Martin Seligman's research on happiness will be considered. This course will sample some of this research and bring it into dialogue with traditional philosophical texts from Western and Eastern philosophy, such as Epicureanism, Stoicism, Taoism, and modern movements such as Existentialism, Liberalism, and Marxism. We will also consider very recent philosophical work on the nature of happiness. Along with this study, we will ask historiographic questions about how the philosophical problem of happiness is temporally and culturally conditioned.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 420 Contemporary Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey of major figures from the post-Hegelian period to the present. Spring. Philosophy majors are strongly urged to take this course only after completing PHIL 401, PHIL 405, and PHIL 410.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 421 American Philosophy 3.00 credits
A study of major figures in the American philosophical tradition.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 422 Postmodern Thought 3.00 credits
Postmodernism has been the single most influential philosophical movement in the late 20th Century. As a response to philosophical modernism and as a broad cultural movement, affecting virtually every field of knowledge and cultural practice, postmodernism challenges us to rethink some of the most basic assumptions of the Western philosophical tradition. This course begins with a review of the meaning of philosophical and cultural modernism. We then consider several of the major founding thinkers of the postmodern movement: Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Francois Lyotard. From its beginnings in the revolutionary atmosphere of the French student rebellion, we move to post-modern thinkers in the analytic and post-analytic tradition, including the later Ludwig Wittgenstein and Richard Rorty. The course concludes with a survey of postmodern culture sampling specific developments in fields such as architecture, music, and contemporary art.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 423 Process Philosophy 3.00 credits
Philosophers such as Bergson and Whitehead, who regard creative process as the essence of the real.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 424 Existentialism 3.00 credits
The movement from Kierkegaard to the present.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 425 Phenomenology 3.00 credits
Some proponents of phenomenological philosophy stemming from Husserl.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 427 Analytic Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey of 20th century Anglo-American philosophy.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 428 Philosophical Hermeneutics 3.00 credits
Allied with phenomenology, philosophical hermeneutics struggles not only with interpreting patterns of meaning in classical philosophical texts, but also with interpreting patterns of meaning in human existence, based on the model of the text.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 429 African Philosophy 3.00 credits
This course provides an introduction to African philosophy. The course is divided into three parts. Part I will focus on recent debates about the nature and scope of African Philosophy. Issues to be examined here include: 1) philosophy and colonialism; 2) the significance of traditional African beliefs for contemporary philosophical practice; 3) individual thinkers and communal wisdom; and (4) writing, versus speech as vehicles for philosophical expression. In Parts II and III we turn more explicitly to philosophical issues concerning (5) science, technology, and modernization in Africa; and (6) African moral and political theory.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 430 Metaphysics 3.00 credits
A systematic ordering and development of the perennial questions concerning being and existence; unity, diversity, truth, value, causality, and transcendence; the existence and nature of God.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 432 Philosophy of Education 3.00 credits
Representative thought regarding educational agents, aims, and curricula.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 433 Philosophy of Psychology 3.00 credits
Systematic philosophical investigation of primary psychological phenomena such as the emotions, intentions, explanations of actions, motivational systems, the nature of self-deception, weakness of will, and the nature of the self. Consideration will be given to general theories of psycho-pathology and to various major psychological schools of thought.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 434 Chinese Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey of the history of Chinese philosophy focusing on the Confucian tradition and taking other traditions such as Taoism and Buddhism into account.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 396 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
PHIL 437 Philosophy of Time 3.00 credits
This course looks at answering the question "What is time?" This is done by looking at ancient and modern arguments surrounding the structure, experience and models of time.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 438 Phil of Love and Friendship 3.00 credits
Survey and analysis of influential accounts of love and friendship, including treatments of erotic/romantic love, friendship, and charity, within a framework provided by C.S. Lewis classic study 'The Four Loves'. Special attention will be given to the relation between views of love and the nature of happiness, proper treatment of others, human desire and psychology, character, self-love, and religious devotion.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 439 Christian Metaphysics 3.00 credits
The course is divided into three parts: 1) the Metaphysics of Nature which studies the principles of created being and the necessity of divine being as its source 2) the Metaphysics of Being which studies being in its most generic characteristics, and 3) the Metaphysics of God which studies the nature of divine being as far as it can be understood by human beings. Among the topics to be considered are: act and potency, causality and chance, the cosmological argument, substance and accident, necessity and contingency, ontological participation, transcendentals, the analogy of being, divine simplicity, and the incarnation.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 440 Theory of Knowledge 3.00 credits
Problems, positions, and synthesis of the modes of human knowing.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 441 Symbolic Logic 3.00 credits
The study of modern symbolic logic (propositional and predicate). Metalogical issues (the syntax and semantics of formal systems) are discussed.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 443 Philosophy of Science 3.00 credits
Examination of recent developments in the philosophy of science and its treatment of the nature and methods of the physical, biological, and social sciences.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 445 Evolution and Creation 3.00 credits
Readings by scientists, theologians and philosophers on issues raised by the theory of evolution. Among the questions to be discussed are: How exactly are evolution and creation related? Are they rival explanations of the same thing? What evidence is there for evolution? How does evolution work? What implications does it have for our understanding of human nature and the place of human beings in nature?
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 446 Phil Refl on Christnty & Scien 3.00 credits
Philosophical inquiry into the historical relationship between Christian religious doctrine and the knowledge imparted by the sciences, with focus on particular episodes such as the Galileo affair and the Darwinian revolution.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 447 Wisdom 3.00 credits
This course in comparative philosophy studies the relationship between wisdom and contemplative practice in three major philosophical/religious traditions: Greek/Hellenic, Judeo/Christian, and Yogic/Samkhya. Students will acquire both a general understanding of the concept of wisdom in each tradition and a specific understanding of how each of these traditions connects wisdom to practice.
 
PHIL 448 Philosophy of Mind 3.00 credits
Treatment of the nature and functional capacities of the mind and the philosophical problems raised by analysis of the mind, including mind and body, materialistic reductionism, other minds, freedom, and personality.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 449 African American Philosophy 3.00 credits
This course will examine the core issues in African American philosophy. These issues will include: (1) the nature and purpose of African American philosophy; (2) questions concerning racial, cultural, and ethnic identity; (3) the varied forms, causes, and consequences of racism; (4) 'separatist' vs. 'assimilationist' strategies for addressing racial injustice; and (5) debates concerning reparations and affirmative action.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 451 Political Philosophy 3.00 credits
An examination of the nature and norms of political life, with attention to major historical themes in the light of contemporary relevance.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 452 Social Ethics 3.00 credits
A consideration of the moral implications of communal life, including such topics as individual rights and distributive justice. Issues such as pornography, capital punishment, and affirmative action are treated.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 453 International Ethics 3.00 credits
The moral structure of the international community in the context of problems such as war, foreign aid, and transnational migration.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: INST 350 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
PHIL 454 Metaethics 3.00 credits
This course is an advanced study of contemporary disputes in ethical theory and metaethics. It will cover issues like the meaning and ontology of moral value and language, the realism-antirealism debate, concerns in moral psychology, and the impact of evolutionary theory on ethics. In addition, the course will also examine a range of competing twentieth-century ethical theories.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 455 Health Care Ethics 3.00 credits
Ethical concepts and issues in the medical field: personhood, relationship between health care professional and patient, experimentation, rights to health care, and allocation of health care resources.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 435 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 456 Feminist Ethics 3.00 credits
Explores women's experiences of oppression and some of the ways in which this has marginalized their concerns and their perceptions of the moral dimension. Feminist contributions to rethinking the concept of moral agency, the traditionally sharp distinction between the public and private domains, the relevance of personal relationships to ethics, and the process of moral development and moral decision-making are considered Spring, odd years.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: WGST 435 - OK if taken since Fall 2009
PHIL 456 Feminist Ethics 3.00 credits
Explores women's experiences of oppression and some of the ways in which this has marginalized their concerns and their perceptions of the moral dimension. Feminist contributions to rethinking the concept of moral agency, the traditionally sharp distinction between the public and private domains, the relevance of personal relationships to ethics, and the process of moral development and moral decision-making are considered Spring, odd years.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: WOMS 435 - OK if taken between Fall 1996 and Fall 2009
PHIL 457 Business Ethics 3.00 credits
The philosophic basis of business and its relation to social development. Responsibilities of the business community to society and the individual. The relationship between economic theories and philosophical approaches.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 458 Environmental Ethics 3.00 credits
The detailed philosophical study of humanity's understanding of its relationship to the natural environment, concentrating on historically prominent conceptions of that relationship, and the philosophical foundation of the contemporary `environmental movement' Annually.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 459 Ethics of Eating 3.00 credits
An examination of ethical issues surrounding the consumption, production and transportation of food. Issues such as organic food, GMOs, vegetarianism, local and slow food movements, and hunger may be covered. Ethical issues surrounding both local and international food issues are treated.
 
Equivalent: ENVS 381 - OK if taken since Fall 2013
PHIL 460 Ethics: Global Climate Change 3.00 credits
Many have described global climate change as the defining challenge of the 21st century, noting that unless dramatic changes are made today, future generations will suffer terrible consequences, such as rising seas, wars over fresh water, tens of millions of environmental refugees, and the extinction of species such as the polar bear. This course will investigate the complex technological, historical, economic, scientific, political, and philosophical issues surrounding this issue. Global warming skeptics are especially encouraged to enroll. Spring and Summer.
 
Equivalent: ENVS 350 - OK if taken since Spring 2010
PHIL 461 Philosophy and Literature 3.00 credits
This course will show how fictional literature can illustrate philosophical insights and how philosophical ideas can help illuminate works of literature.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 465 Philosophy of Religion 3.00 credits
A study of the nature of religious experience and practice, and how religious language and belief relate to science, morality and aesthetics. Included is also a study of what is meant by 'God,' divine attributes and proofs for and against God's existence.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or WGST 237C Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 466 Philosophy of God 3.00 credits
Philosophical views about God and our knowledge of God.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: RELI 491 - OK if taken since Fall 2001
PHIL 467 Faith and Reason 3.00 credits
This course will address a cluster of fundamental problems of faith and reason--the nature of knowledge, especially in connection with religious claims, evidence for the existence of God, the relevance of recent advances in cosmology to the Christian world view, the problem of evil and suffering, and the challenge of atheism.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 470 Philosophy of Law 3.00 credits
The sources, structure, and function of human law and its relations to moral law.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 471 Philosophy of Literature 3.00 credits
What is literature and what is it for? This course considers a variety of answers to these questions by both philosophers and writers. This course is sometimes organized historically covering major developments in western thought about literature including Platonic, Renaissance, Romantic and Contemporary. Other semesters the course is organized systematically with a heavy emphasis on theories of interpretation, each of which entails a view of the nature of literary language.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 472 Philosophy of Art 3.00 credits
An analysis of beauty, creativity, and taste according to the theories of Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, and selected contemporary philosophers. Several representative works from all areas of the fine arts are examined in the light of the aesthetic principles of classical philosophy.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
Equivalent: VART 466 - OK if taken since Fall 1996
PHIL 475 Philosophy of the Visual Arts 3.00 credits
Examines contemporary applied theories of art in a variety of visual art media including painting, sculpture, film, and photography.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 476 Racism, Slavery, & Evil 3.00 credits
A study of events in the history of slavery, reconstruction, the Jim Crow era, the civil rights struggle in terms of different philosophers' accounts of the nature of human evil. In addition to the focus on evil, we will discuss philosophically the complexities and adequacy of some of the responses to the evils we study. This course satisfies the social justice requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 478 Philosophy of Technology 3.00 credits
This course in applied philosophy involves reflection and self-understanding of our technology-saturated world. Examinations of well-known philosophers' writings on technology will be covered. Course goals include a deeper, more reflective understanding of the nature of technology, its role in our lives, its ethical implications, its political ramifications and its relation to society.
 
PHIL 481 Ancient Concepts of Justice 3.00 credits
Many Modern theories of social justice rest upon models developed in classical antiquity. Similarly, many modern institutions and laws relating to justice have ancient precursors. This course examines major classical texts dealing with justice: selected Pre-Socratic texts; Plato, Republic; Thucydides, History of Peloponnesian war, Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, Book V, selections from Cicero; selections from other Hellenistic and late Roman authors (including Augustine).
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 483 Phil Iss: Ancient Greek Drama 3.00 credits
This course covers many of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Aristophanes, with a view to uncovering their insights into the nature of moral agency, the interplay of the emotions, the nature of motivation, the relation of the individual to his or her kinship group and the wider political society. Philosophical issues concerning free will, determinism, the mind-body problem, and epistemological issues will be explored.
 
PHIL 484 Major Figures and Movements 3.00 credits
An in-depth exploration of the work of a single figure or movement in the history of philosophy. (Majors/minors only.)
 
PHIL 485 Philosophy in Film 3.00 credits
Many current films raise first-order philosophical questions or issues, though few films are particularly good at solving those same problems or resolving the conflict underlying the issues. This course seeks to explore many contemporary films (none older than "Blade Runner") and the philosophical issues they raise, both by their explicit content and by their implicit content. Metaphysical issues about the mind and body relationship, the nature and extent of free will, and the nature of personal identity will be included. Some epistemological issues having to do with how well we can expect to have access to reality, and what might be among the impediments to the access will also be included. The course generally avoids treating ethical or moral issues, but also takes an interest in the use of the emotions in films, the treatment of violence and human sexuality in films and the nature of comedy in films. Some attention will also be given to film techniques, especially from the point of view of the audience.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 486 Seminar 3.00 credits
Topics will vary.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 487 Seminar 3.00 credits
Topics will vary.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 489H Honors Seminar 3.00 credits
Topics and credit by arrangement. Spring or Fall.
 
Prerequisite: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 490 Directed Study 1.00 - 6.00 credits
Topics by arrangement.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 495 Study Abroad Special Topics 1.00 - 15.00 credits
For department use only.
 
PHIL 498 Research 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Course requires permission of instructor and department chair.
 
PHIL 499 Sr Sem-Metaphysic-Epistemology 3.00 credits
Each student will present a number of short papers on metaphysical and/or epistemological topics. Students will develop and defend philosophical positions for discussion by the class. Prerequisite: Fourth year standing, philosophy major. Spring.
 
Prerequisite: PHIL 301 Minimum Grade: D or PHIL 301H Minimum Grade: D
PHIL 501 History of Ancient Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey of major figures and developments in ancient Greek and Hellenistic philosophy from Thales to Plotinus, using texts in translations. Fall.
 
PHIL 505 History of Medieval Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey of the major philosophical movements in the Latin, Greek, and Arabic traditions from the seventh to the fourteenth centuries. Attention is given to bibliography and methodology for research in medieval philosophy. Spring.
 
PHIL 509 Social Justice 3.00 credits
This course will critically consider famous theories of justice, as well as their applications to some social and moral problems.
 
PHIL 510 History of Modern Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey from Descartes through Hegel. Fall.
 
PHIL 516 Marxism 3.00 credits
Some major writings of Marx, the social and intellectual history of Marxism, the relationship between Marxist theory and revolutionary practice, and contemporary problems in Marxism.
 
PHIL 517 C.S. Lewis 3.00 credits
This course examines Lewis the Christian intellectual as his participation in the Christian theistic tradition and his philosophical training exhibit themselves in his fictional, philosophical and theological works.
 
PHIL 518 Walker Percy 3.00 credits
This course examines both fiction and non-fiction works by Walker Percy (1916-1990), with particular emphasis on his development of existential themes and C.S. Peirce's semiotics. We investigate Peter Augustine Lawler's description of Percy as a proponent of "postmodernism rightly understood."
 
PHIL 520 Contemporary Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey of major figures from the post-Hegelian period to the present. Spring.
 
PHIL 521 American Philosophy 3.00 credits
A study of major figures in the American philosophical tradition.
 
PHIL 524 Existentialism 3.00 credits
The movement from Kierkegaard to the present.
 
PHIL 525 Phenomenology 3.00 credits
Some proponents of phenomenological philosophy stemming from Husserl.
 
PHIL 526 Existential Psychology 3.00 credits
A study of important existentialist philosophers and their influence upon psychology and psychologists.
 
PHIL 528 Philosophical Hermeneutics 3.00 credits
Allied with phenomenology, philosophical hermeneutics struggles not only with interpreting patterns of meaning in classical philosophical texts, but also with interpreting patterns of meaning in human existence based on the model of the text.
 
PHIL 530 Metaphysics 3.00 credits
A systematic ordering and development of the perennial questions concerning being and existence; unity, diversity, truth, value, causality, and transcendence; and the existence and nature of God.
 
PHIL 534 Chinese Philosophy 3.00 credits
A survey of the history of Chinese philosophy focusing on the Confucian tradition and taking other traditions such as Taoism and Buddhism into account.
 
PHIL 538 Phil of Love and Friendship 3.00 credits
Survey and analysis of influential accounts of love and friendship, including treatments of erotic/romantic love, friendship, and charity, within a framework provided by C.S. Lewis classic study 'The Four Loves'. Special attention will be given to the relation between views of love and the nature of happiness, proper treatment of others, human desire and psychology, character, self-love, and religious devotion.
 
PHIL 540 Theory of Knowledge 3.00 credits
Problems, positions and synthesis of the modes of human knowledge.
 
PHIL 541 Symbolic Logic 3.00 credits
The study of modern symbolic logic (propositional and predicate). Metalogical issues (the syntax and semantics of formal systems) are discussed.
 
PHIL 546 Phil Refl on Christnty & Scien 3.00 credits
Philosophical inquiry into the historical relationship between Christian religious doctrine and the knowledge imparted by the sciences, with focus on particular episodes such as the Galileo affair and the Darwinian revolution.
 
PHIL 565 Philosophy of Religion 3.00 credits
A study of the nature of religious experience and practice, and how religious language and belief relate to science, morality and aesthetics. Included is also a study of what is meant by 'God,' divine attributes and proofs for and against God's existence.
 
PHIL 567 Faith and Reason 3.00 credits
This course will address a cluster of fundamental problems of faith and reason--the nature of knowledge, especially in connection with religious claims, evidence for the existence of God, the relevance of recent advances in cosmology to the Christian world view, the problem of evil and suffering, and the challenge of atheism.
 
PHIL 577 Graduate Seminar 3.00 credits
A seminar will be scheduled for graduate students in philosophy each fall and spring semester. Topics will vary. Class size is limited to allow for greater student participation and writing.
 
PHIL 578 Philosophy of Technology 3.00 credits
This course in applied philosophy involves reflection and self-understanding of our technology-saturated world. Examinations of well-known philosophers' writings on technology will be covered. Course goals include a deeper, more reflective understanding of the nature of technology, its role in our lives, its ethical implications, its political ramifications and its relation to society.
 
PHIL 579 Graduate Seminar 3.00 credits
A seminar will be scheduled for graduate students in philosophy each semester. Topics will vary. Class size is limited to allow for greater student participation and writing.
 
PHIL 585 Philosophy in Film 3.00 credits
Many current films raise first-order philosophical questions or issues, though few films are particularly good at solving those same problems or resolving the conflict underlying the issues. This course seeks to explore many contemporary films (none older than "Blade Runner") and the philosophical issues they raise, both by their explicit content and by their implicit content. Metaphysical issues about the mind and body relationship, the nature and extent of free will, and the nature of personal identity will be included. Some epistemological issues having to do with how well we can expect to have access to reality, and what might be among the impediments to the access, will also be included. The course generally avoids treating ethical or moral issues, but also takes an interest in the use of the emotions in films, the treatment of violence and human sexuality in films, the nature of comedy in films. Some attention will also be given to film techniques, especially from the point of view of the audience.
 
PHIL 586 Seminar 1.00 - 3.00 credits
Topics will vary.
 
PHIL 587 Seminar 3.00 credits
Topics will vary.
 
PHIL 588 Seminar 3.00 credits
Topics will vary.
 
Equivalent: RELI 579A - OK if taken since Fall 1996
PHIL 611 Continuing Research 1.00 credit
 
PHIL 690 Directed Study 1.00 - 7.00 credits
Credits and material to be arranged. Must have form completed before registering.
 
PHIL 695 Logic Requirement .00 credits
 
PHIL 697 Comprehensive Examination .00 credits
Students must register via ZAGWEB for comprehensive exams.
 
PHIL 698 Research 1.00 - 9.00 credits
 
PHIL 699 Thesis 6.00 credits
Students must register via ZAGWEB for Thesis credits.